Buy Fiction, Non-Fiction Books & e-books Little, Brown Book Group

Search Our Books

Book Title

Filter By

Clear all
Our books

Organizational Diagnosis

By M. R. Weisbord
Authors:
M. R. Weisbord
  • More

On Moral Fiction

By John Gardner
Authors:
John Gardner
A genuine classic of literary criticism, On Moral Fiction argues that "true art is by its nature moral."
  • More
  • Over The Frontier

    By Stevie Smith
    Authors:
    Stevie Smith
    It is 1936. Pompey Casmilus lives in London with her beloved Aunt, bothered by the menace of German militarism, bothered too by the humbug wich confronts it, bothered most of all by her hopeless love affair with Freddy, Its ending plunges Pompey into melancholy, six months rest and recuperation are prescribed and 'savage, sick and cross' Pompey goes to Schloss Tilssen on the northern German border, only to fall in with a strange band of conspirators: the plum coloured Mrs Pouncer, the absent minded Colonel Peck and the dashing Major Tom Satterthwaite, whom Pompey comes to love.
    • More
  • The Oak Apple

    By Cynthia Harrod-Eagles
    Authors:
    Cynthia Harrod-Eagles
    1630: after long years of peace the reign of Charles I brings brutal civil war to England.The clash between King and Parliament is echoed at Morland Place when Richard brings home a Puritan bride while his brother, Kit, joins Prince Rupert and the Royalist cavalry, leaving their father Edmund desperately trying to steer a middle course between the fighting factions.As the war grinds on, bitterness and disillusion replace the early fervour, and the schisms between husband and wife, father and son, grow deeper. Edmund struggles grimly through it all in an attempt to keep the Morland fortune intact, but he is thwarted by the estrangement between his sons and then alienated from his beloved wife, Mary.
    • More
  • The Optimist's Daughter

    By Eudora Welty
    Authors:
    Eudora Welty
    The people of Mount Salus, Mississippi always felt good about Judge McKelva. He was a quiet, solid reassuring figure, just as a judge should be. Then, ten years after his first wife's death, he marries the frivolous young Wanda Fay. No-one can understand his action, not least his beloved daughter, Laurel, who finds it hard to accept the new bride. It is only some years later, when circumstance brings her back to her childhood home, that Laurel stirs old memories and comes to understand the peculiarities of her upbringing, and the true relationship between her parents and herself.The Optimist's Daughter is a reflective, poignant novel of independence and love, for which Eudora Welty, one of America's gretest contemporary Southern writers, was awarded the Pulitzer Prize.
    • More
  • One Fine Day

    By Mollie Panter-Downes
    Authors:
    Mollie Panter-Downes
    It is a summer's day in 1946. The English village of Wealding is no longer troubled by distant sirens, yet the rustling coils of barbed wire are a reminder that something, some quality of life, has evaporated. Together again after years of separation, Laura and Stephen Marshall and their daughter Victoria are forced to manage without 'those anonymous caps and aprons who lived out of sight and pulled the strings'. Their rambling garden refuses to be tamed, the house seems perceptibly to crumble. But alone on a hillside, as evening falls, Laura comes to see what it would have meant if the war had been lost, and looks to the future with a new hope and optimism. First published in 1947, this subtle, finely wrought novel presents a memorable portrait of the aftermath of war, its effect upon a marriage, charting, too, a gradual but significant change in the nature of English middle-class life.
    • More

    The Old Straight Track

    By Alfred Watkins
    Authors:
    Alfred Watkins
    First published in 1925 THE OLD STRAIGHT TRACK remains the most important source for the study of ancient tracks or leys that criss-cross the British Isles- a fascinating system which was old when the Romans came to Britain.First in the Herefordshire countryside, and later throughout Britain, Alfred Watkins noticed that beacon hills, mounds, earthworks, moats and old churches built on pagan sites seemed to fall in straight lines. His investigation convinced him that Britain was covered with a vast network of straight tracks, aligned with either the sun or the path of a star.Although traces of this network can be found all over the country, the principles behind the ley system remain a mystery. Are they the legacy of a prehistoric scientific knowledge which is now all but lost? And was their purpose secular or religious?
    • More

    Order Out Of Chaos

    By Dolly McPherson
    Authors:
    Dolly McPherson
    I know of no other autobiography in American letters who celebrates and sings her life with as much verve and display of vulnerability.' With this acknowledgement of Maya Angelou's unique achievement, Dolly McPherson reveals her place within the Black autobiographical tradition. With fascinating insights into Maya Angelou's life and creativity, and a shrewd examination of her techniques and recurring themes, Dolly McPherson provides us with a picture of this extraordinary woman's life and a reading of these rich autobiographical writings. She remarks too on Maya Angelou's exceptional ear, her recording of the precise, vivid a word and phrase, and on the warmth and humour in her writing. The book closes with an interview between these two great friends - a wonderful epilogue to this picture of a greatly admired woman.
    • More

    Original Mother Goose

    By Blanche Fisher Wright
    Authors:
    Blanche Fisher Wright
    A glorious, full-colour collection of Mother Goose rhymes, featuring the classic Blanche Fisher Wright illustrations. favourite nursery rhymes fill the pages of this deluxe volume, complete with a real cloth binding and beautiful tipped-on cover art.
    • More

    Out Of The Barrio

    By Linda Chavez
    Authors:
    Linda Chavez
    Are Hispanics making it",achieving the American dream following the pattern of other ethnic groups? This controversial book shatters the myth that 20 million His panics,fast becoming the nation's largest minority,are a permanent underclass. Chavez considers the radical implications for bilingual education, immigration policy, and affirmative action.
    • More
  • Only Poet And Other Stories

    By Rebecca West
    Authors:
    Rebecca West
    A volume of Rebecca West's short fiction. Including the novella "The Only Poet", found amongst her papers after her death, this selection comprises unpublished work and published stories gathered from British and American journals and periodicals.
    • More

    The Overworked American

    By Juliet Schor
    Authors:
    Juliet Schor
    This pathbreaking book explains why, contrary to all expectations, Americans are working harder than ever. Juliet Schor presents the astonishing news that over the past twenty years our working hours have increased by the equivalent of one month per year,a dramatic spurt that has hit everybody: men and women, professionals as well as low-paid workers. Why are we,unlike every other industrialized Western nation,repeatedly "choosing" money over time? And what can we do to get off the treadmill?
    • More

    Origins Reconsidered

    By Roger Lewin, Richard E. Leakey
    Authors:
    Roger Lewin, Richard E. Leakey
    Richard Leakey questions the widely accepted idea of a 2 million-year-old ancestry of hunters and gatherers - the men hunting, the women raising children - that is the basis of modern man's nuclear family, and asks why the first signs of humanity occurred a mere 15,000 years ago in the cave paintings of Lascaux. What was going on in the minds of men before that first recorded expression of art and humanity occurred? Richard Leakey also wrote People of the Lake and The Making of Mankind . Roger Lewin is also the author of the prize-winning Bones of Contention.
    • More

    Oscar Wilde

    By Jonathan Harris, Phillippe Julian
    Authors:
    Jonathan Harris, Phillippe Julian
    '..a biographer of supreme intelligence and industry, since the bibliography is immense and he has delved into it with extraordinary taste and imagination.' - The Spectator'An excellent book, detailed where detail was still needed, sensibly perfunctory where almost everything possible has already been told and said.' - The Observer'M. Jullian's book succeeds in keeping the reader's interest unflaggingly alive.' - The Economist
    • More

    On Human Rights

    By Stephen Shute, Susan Hurley
    Authors:
    Stephen Shute, Susan Hurley
    Are there any human rights that apply to all women and all men in all cultures at all times? Can we ground human rights in an abstract rationality possessed by every human being? Or, as some philosophers have claimed, are attempts to ground human rights doomed to failure? Do human rights in any case need such grounding? On Human Rights, the second book in the Oxford Amnesty Lecture Series, presents the opinions of seven distinguished contributors who approach the problem of universal human rights from a variety of perspectives using a wealth of contemporary and historical material. The essays make a significant contribution to the theory and practice of human rights . They grapple with the hard questions that confront anyone concerned with responding appropriately to the numerous violations of human rights that surround us.
    • More

    On The Edge

    By Carl H Nightingale
    Authors:
    Carl H Nightingale
    Filled with fascinating insights into the collective emotional life of inner-city kids, this book is also a highly original history of the erosion of urban community life since World War II.
    • More

    Out Of Control

    By Kevin Kelly
    Authors:
    Kevin Kelly
    Out of Control chronicles the dawn of a new era in which the machines and systems that drive our economy are so complex and autonomous as to be indistinguishable from living things.
    • More

    The Outbreak Of Rebellion

    By John G. Nicolay
    Authors:
    John G. Nicolay
    John G. Nicolay (1832-1901) was an undeniably apt and brilliant choice to inaugurate the landmark Campaigns of the Civil War series. Private secretary to President Lincoln and coauthor (with John Hay) of the monumental, ten-volume Lincoln biography, Nicolay experienced the Civil War from a unique vantage point: living in the White House, witnessing the many momentous events and minor wranglings, sharing the nation's trauma with Lincoln, and winning his open confidence. It is Nicolay's firsthand knowledge and personal observations of the key figures that imbue The Outbreak of Rebellion (1881) with immediacy and thrust. Here is the secession fever that swept the South Lincoln's shrewd and desperate maneuverings to hold the border states the behind-the-scenes debates about how to respond to the crisis the attack on Fort Sumter and the call to arms and the hard-fought battle along Bull Run creek that resulted in a chaotic Federal defeat and the first appalling casualties of the war. Nicolay's insider view of the opening act of the Civil War has produced a succinct, compelling account of considerable value and fascinating insights.
    • More

    The Orton Diaries

    By Joe Orton
    Authors:
    Joe Orton
    "To be young, good-looking, healthy, famous, comparatively rich and happy is surely going against nature." When Joe Orton (1933-1967) wrote those words in his diary in May 1967, he was being hailed as the greatest comic playwright since Oscar Wilde for his darkly hilarious Entertaining Mr. Sloane and the farce hit Loot , and was completing What the Butler Saw but less than three months later, his longtime companion, Kenneth Halliwell, smashed in Orton's skull with a hammer before killing himself. The Orton Diaries , written during his last eight months, chronicle in a remarkably candid style his outrageously unfettered life: his literary success, capped by an Evening Standard Award and overtures from the Beatles his sexual escapades,at his mother's funeral, with a dwarf in Brighton, and, extensively, in Tangiers and the breakdown of his sixteen-year "marriage" to Halliwell, the relationship that transformed and destroyed him. Edited with a superb introduction by John Lahr, The Orton Diaries is his crowning achievement.
    • More

    The Origin Of Humankind

    By Richard Leakey
    Authors:
    Richard Leakey
    The name Leakey is synonymous with the study of human origins," wrote The New York Times. The renowned family of paleontologists,Louis Leakey, Mary Leakey, and their son Richard Leakey,has vastly expanded our understanding of human evolution. The Origin of Humankind is Richard Leakey's personal view of the development of Homo Sapiens. At the heart of his new picture of evolution is the introduction of a heretical notion: once the first apes walked upright, the evolution of modern humans became possible and perhaps inevitable. From this one evolutionary step comes all the other evolutionary refinements and distinctions that set the human race apart from the apes. In fascinating sections on how and why modern humans developed a social organization, culture, and personal behaviour, Leakey has much of interest to say about the development of art, language, and human consciousness.
    • More