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The Legacy Of The Blues

By Samuel B. Charters
Authors:
Samuel B. Charters
Blues is a language,one which has evolved its own rules and which is the sole property of a culture always forced to the periphery of white society. As such it is a political language. Whether it is passed as a legacy from African village to Mississippi farm, or from farm to Chicago ghetto, or from ghetto to Paris cafe, it is part of a larger oral heritage that is an expression of black America. Makeshift instruments, runaway slaves, railroads, prisons, empty rooms, work gangs, blindness, and pain have all been involved in the passing of this legacy, which has moved from hand to hand like a bottle of whiskey among friends and which now, for whatever reasons, seems faced with extinction. As Lightnin' Hopkins says: "I see a few young musicians coming along. But it's not many. It's not many at all, and the few that is,I'll tell you, you know what I mean, they don't have it. They just don't feel it. . . . I never had that trouble. I had the one thing you need to be a blues singer. I was born with the blues."With an awareness of the urgency involved, and with considerable devotion, Samuel Charters has chosen twelve major bluesmen, each whom represents a major facet of the blues, and has written about them. Rather than adopt the voyeuristic tone of the academician, he has used the direct visceral images that have always composed the blues. Also included are interviews, photographs, lyrics, and separate chapters on the black experience in America, and the evolution of the blues language from its African origins. Samuel Charters has renewed contact with the greatness of the blues legacy,from the haunting lyric songs of the bluesmen like Robert Pete Williams and Lightnin' Hopkins to the fiercely joyous shouts of Champion Jack Depree, Memphis Slim, and Mighty Joe Young.
  • The Life And Death Of Harriett Frean

    By May Sinclair
    Authors:
    May Sinclair
    Well, I'm glad my little girl didn't snatch and push. It's better to go without than to take from other people. That's ugly.'Harriett is the Victorian embodiment of all the virtues then viewed as essential to the womanly ideal: a woman reared to love, honour and obey. Idolising her parents, she learns from childhood to equate love with self-sacrifice, so that when she falls in love with the fiance of her closest friend, renunciation of this unworthy passion initially brings her a peculiar sort of happiness. But the passing of time reveals a different truth. Ironic, brief and intensely realised, The Life and Death of Harriett Frean (1922) is a brilliant study of female virtue seen as vice, and stands with the work of Virgina Woolf and Dorothy Richardson as one of the great innovative novels of the century.

    Live At The Village Vanguard

    By Max Gordon
    Authors:
    Max Gordon
    Since 1934, the Village Vanguard in New York's Greenwich Village has hosted the foremost in live jazz, folk music, and comedy. Its owner, Max Gordon, has now written a personal history of his club and the hundreds of entertainment legends who have played there. Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, Sonny Rollins, Lenny Bruce, Woody Allen, Woodie Guthrie, Betty Comden and Adolph Green, Josh White, Pete Seeger,Max has stories about all of them. And what stories! As Nat Hentoff says in his introduction, "A good many so-called professional writers have not done nearly so well."

    Lady Oracle

    By Margaret Atwood
    Authors:
    Margaret Atwood
    By the author of The Handmaid's Tale and Alias Grace* The trick was to disappear without a trace, leaving behind me the shadow of a corpse, a shadow everyone would mistake for solid reality. At first I thought I'd managed it. Fat girl, thin girl. Red hair, brown hair. Polish aristocrat, radical husband. Joan Foster has dozens of different identities, and she's utterly confused by them all. After a life spent running away from difficult situations, she decides to escape to a hill town in Italy to take stock of her life. But first she must carefully arrange her own death. *'A mistress of controlled hysteria' - Time'If you feel safe only with "nine to five" reality, you'll probably not enjoy her books. But if you'd like to lift off, try her' - Cosmopolitan
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  • A Lady's Life In The Rocky Mountains

    By Isabella L. Bird
    Authors:
    Isabella L. Bird
    Born in 1831, Isabella, daughter of a clergyman, set off alone to the Antipodes in 1872 'in search of health' and found she had embarked on a life of adventurous travel. In 1873, wearing Hawaiian riding dress, she rode on her spirited horse Birdie through the American 'Wild West', a terrain only recently opened to pioneer settlement. Here she met Rocky Mountain Jim, her 'dear (one-eyed) desperado', fond of poetry and whisky - 'a man any women might love, but no sane woman would marry'. He helped her climb the 'American Matterhorn' and round up cattle on horseback.The wonderful letters which make up this volume were first published in 1879 and were enormously popular in Isabella Bird's lifetime. They tell of magnificent unspoilt landscapes and abundant wildlife, of small remote townships, of her encounters with rattlesnakes, wolves, pumas and grizzly bears and her reactions to the volatile passions of the miners and pioneer settlers.
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    Local Knowledge

    By Clifford Geertz
    Authors:
    Clifford Geertz
    In essays covering everything from art and common sense to charisma and constructions of the self, the eminent cultural anthropologist and author of The Interpretation of Cultures deepens our understanding of human societies through the intimacies of "local knowledge." A companion volume to The Interpretation of Cultures , this book continues Geertz's exploration of the meaning of culture and the importance of shared cultural symbolism. With a new introduction by the author.
  • Lucy Gayheart

    By Willa Cather
    Authors:
    Willa Cather
    It is 1901, and Lucy Gayheart with her 'singular brightness of young beauty', is studying music in the magical smoky city of Chicago. She is courted by handsome Harry Gordon, the most eligible bachelor in Haverford, the Midwestern town she comes from. But Lucy falls in love with middle-aged Sebastien, a famous singer, whose talents and tenderness change her life forever. First published in 1935, this novel of 'achieved simplicity' displays the depth of Willa Cather's sympathy, both for the world of high art and for the reticent decencies of small town life.

    Louis Pasteur

    By René Dubos
    Authors:
    René Dubos
    In the words of one of his English contemporaries, Louis Pasteur was "the most perfect man who ever entered the kingdom of science." His contributions to the development of microbiology and medicine were profound, both practically (Pasteurization and vaccination) and theoretically (the germ model of disease). He spoke out forcefully on issues of the day, especially when they concerned public health, and his research included studies on rabies, anaerobic life, childbirth fever, silkworms, and beer. René Dubos's outstanding biography examines Pasteur's manifold genius in the context of the era,Pasteur was an exemplary nineteenth-century bourgeois,and in light of recent environmental thought. His view of Pasteur as ecologist, the first to formulate in concrete terms a biological and chemical theory of global ecosystems, is only one of the many surprising insights into a man whose emblematic fame has obscured a complex and rich life.
  • Landscape For A Good Woman

    By Carolyn Steedman
    Authors:
    Carolyn Steedman
    This book is about lives lived out on the borderlands, lives for which the central interpretative devices of the culture don't quite work. It has a childhood at its centre - my childhood, a personal past - and it is about the disruption of that fifties childhood by the one my mother had lived out before me, and the stories she told about it.'Intricate and inspiring, this unusual book uses autobiographical elements to depict a mother and her daughter and two working-class childhoods (Burnley in the 1920s, South London in the 1950s) and to find a place for their stories in history and politics, in psychoanalysis and feminism.'Provocative and quite dazzling in its ambitions. . . Beautifully written, intellectually compelling' Judith Walkowitz
  • Liza's England

    By Pat Barker
    Authors:
    Pat Barker
    Dauntless Liza Jarrett, born at the dawn of the twentieth century, is now in her eighties, frail and facing eviction with her cantankerous parrot Nelson, when she is visited by Stephen, a young gay social worker. As she learns to trust him, she recalls her life - her embittered, exhausted mother, her shell-shocked spiritualist husband, her beloved son and chaotic daugter. Their friendship, deepening with the unfolding of their stories, comes to sustain Liza through her last battle and brings new courage to Stephen.
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    Louis

    By John Chilton, Max Jones
    Authors:
    John Chilton, Max Jones

    Lincoln And The Civil War

    By John Hay
    Authors:
    John Hay

    Le Corbusier

    By Stephen Gardiner
    Authors:
    Stephen Gardiner

    Letters Between Katherine Mansfield and John Middleton Murry

    By Katherine Mansfield, Cherry A. Hankin
    Authors:
    Katherine Mansfield, Cherry A. Hankin
    A collection of the correspondence between Katherine Mansfield and John Middleton Murry. Their lives were inextricably, and often painfully, intertwined until her tragically early death from tuberculosis in 1923.

    Lawrence Of Arabia

    By B. H. Liddell Hart
    Authors:
    B. H. Liddell Hart
    T. E. Shaw, better known as Lawrence of Arabia, was one of the most romantic, heroic, and enigmatic figures of his day. The subject of myth and hagiography, he was equally accomplished in several fields,as archaeologist, diplomat, writer, and soldier,and he worked throughout World War I and after in the Middle East in efforts to promote independent Arab states. His autobiography Seven Pillars of Wisdom is one of the greatest works of its kind. The esteemed military historian B. H. Liddell Hart wrote this study of Lawrence in order to pierce the clouds of legend. He discussed Lawrence's Oxford days, his experiences as an intelligence officer in Egypt, and in particular the tactics of guerrilla warfare he practiced so effectively against the large Turkish armies during World War I. Liddell Hart was one of the few to give Lawrence his full justice as both a man and a brilliant soldier. Long out-of-print, this book unravels the many puzzling features of Lawrence's story and restores him to his proper place as one of the twentieth century's heroic, but very human, figures.

    Lincoln's Herndon

    By David Herbert Donald
    Authors:
    David Herbert Donald
    Occasionally a book that begins as a work of scholarship becomes a great and profoundly moving human document. This life of Lincoln's friend, law partner and biographer is such a book. It has a two-fold focus: on the "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" days,the days of Lincoln's courting, arguing, and politicking and on Herndon's long and wracking fight to publish his biography in the face of poverty, drive, and disillusionment, it achieves the impetus and grandeur of tragedy. David Donald has given us a magnificent account of how a country lawyer became a national figure and what happened to the friend he left behind when he became president. An impressive study of mythmakers and mythmaking, this biography of William Henry Herndon, a man intimately connected to movements for abolition of slavery, temperance, religious liberalism, currency reform, and women's rights is also a sweeping picture of America just before, during, and after the Civil War.

    Learning All The Time

    By John Holt
    Authors:
    John Holt
    The essence of John Holt's insight into learning and small children is captured in Learning All The Time. This delightful book by the influential author of How Children Fail and How Children Learn shows how children learn to read, write, and count in their everyday life at home and how adults can respect and encourage this wonderful process. For human beings, he reminds us, learning is as natural as breathing. John Holt's wit, his gentle wisdom, and his infectious love of little children bring joy to parent and teacher alike.

    The Lincoln Reader

    By Paul M. Angle
    Authors:
    Paul M. Angle
    The Lincoln Reader is a biography of Abraham Lincoln written by sixty-five authors. Paul Angle, the noted Lincoln scholar, selected passages from the works on contemporaries, later biographers, and even Lincoln himself, to form a composite portrait of one of the wisest and most beloved American presidents. These passages, interwoven by Angle's running commentary, blend into a single vivid narrative of Lincoln's life, from his boyhood in Indiana to his assassination and funeral. First published in 1947, The Lincoln Reader has long been considered the most definitive, complete, and authentic retelling of the life of Abraham Lincoln

    Liability

    By Peter W. Huber
    Authors:
    Peter W. Huber
    This controversial book describes the transformation of modern tort law since the 1960s, and shows how the dramatic increase in liability lawsuits has had an adverse effect on the safety, health, the cost of insurance, and individual rights.

    Le Manoir Aux Quat' Saisons

    By Raymond Blanc
    Authors:
    Raymond Blanc
    Raymond Blanc has achieved worldwide fame as an inspired chef with a relentless drive for perfection. His cooking has been described as 'an extraordinary process of creativity, passion, subtlety, indeed genius'. He is entirely self-taught and has never revealed the secrets of his cuisine. But here he explains his uniquely successful methods and shares some of the very special recipes from his Oxfordshire restaurant, Le Manoir aux Quat' Saisons. M. Blanc's reputation is such that even before it opened in 1984, Le Manoir was awarded two Michelin stars. In keeping with Raymond Blanc's insistence on fresh produce, the emphasis in this book is on seasonal variety, with thirty to forty recipes for each season. With glorious photographs by Michael Boys, a preface by Egon Ronay and foreword by Hugh Johnson, Le Manoir aux Quat' Saisons conveys a little of the genius of the chef widely regarded as the best in Britain.