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What Would Virginia Woolf Do?

By Nina Lorez Collins
Authors:
Nina Lorez Collins
When Nina Collins entered her forties she found herself sloshing in a brew of hormones. As symptoms of perimenopause set in, she began to fear losing her health, looks, sexuality, sense of humor-perhaps all at once. Craving a place to discuss her questions and concerns, and finding none, Nina started a Facebook group with the ironic name, "What Would Virginia Woolf Do?," which has grown exponentially into a place where women-most with strong opinions and fierce senses of humor--have surprisingly candid, lively, and intimate conversations.Mid-life is a time when women want to think about purpose, about how to be their best selves, and how to love themselves as they enter the second half of life. They yearn to acknowledge the nostalgia and sadness that comes with aging, but also want to revel in their hard-earned wisdom.Part memoir and part resource on everything from fashion and skincare to sex and surviving the empty nest, What Would Virginia Woolf Do? is a frank and intimate conversation mixed with anecdotes and honesty, wrapped up in a literary joke. It's also a destination, a place where readers can nestle in and see what happens when women feel comfortable enough to get real with each other: defy the shame that the culture often throws their way, find solace and laugh out loud, and revel in this new phase of life.

Whatever!

By Gill Hines, Alison Baverstock
Authors:
Gill Hines, Alison Baverstock
Do you find bringing up teenagers more of a pain than a pleasure?Raising teenagers can test parental love to breaking point, particularly if you have previously enjoyed a close and loving relationship. The child whose every joy and sadness you shared has suddenly become taller than you, louder than you, with an inside knowledge of all your failings - and a sudden urge to point them out. What's more, this newly arrived creature may spend half their life glued to a gadget, talk and dress in a way you find alien and respond to all queries with a grunt or a dismissal - whilst expecting ever-greater financial hand-outs.Help is however at hand. This completely revised and updated edition of a parenting classic is full of advice to help teenagers, their parents and the rest of the family. It offers a wealth of sound advice plus tried and tested strategies for every aspect of life with a teen - from alcohol to cyberbullying, sexting to household chores - which you can put into practice immediately. You'll quickly wonder how you ever managed without this book.
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  • The Whole-Food Guide for Breast Cancer Survivors

    By Ed Bauman
    Authors:
    Ed Bauman
    Millions of breast cancer survivors have two things in common: a renewed gratitude for their good health and a recharged commitment to taking care of their bodies. The Whole-Food Guide for Breast Cancer Survivors is an integrative, whole foods guide to rebuilding health after surviving breast cancer and reducing the chance of breast cancer reoccurrence. Although cancer does have a significant genetic component, lifestyle factors such as nutrition also play a role in determining the likelihood that cancer will reappear. This program helps readers get the nutrition they need in order to keep breast cancer at bay, with specific guidance for managing hormone levels with food. The guide also explains how nutritional deficiencies, environmental factors, and antioxidants affect cancer's ability to attack the body. Using holistic health and nutrition leader Edward Bauman's Eating for Health model, readers learn to eat for pleasure, eat for energy, eat for recovery, and eat for health in order to starve cancer and enjoy stronger, healthier bodies.

    Women And Desire

    By Polly Young-Eisendrath
    Authors:
    Polly Young-Eisendrath
    Many years ago the famous French psychoanalyst Jaques Lacan said that women want to be wanted, not to be loved. Now, in her fascinating book about female desire and empowerment, internationally renowned Jungian analyst and author Polly Young-Eisendrath explores this idea further. Women look to others to provide them with confidence, happiness and self-esteem. This reliance produces a need to please others, in order to receive praise. We please others by trying to conform to an image, rather than finding out what our real needs are. If this image conflicts with our inner needs we can become resentful, frustrated and out of control. Often we deal with this unhappiness by trying even harder to make ourselves the kind of spouse, lover, mother or worker who is wanted and desired. We have to abandon these female images and discover our own real needs, without fear or shame. Only by learning to voice these needs clearly, and meet them from within, can we escape the cycle of 'wanting to be wanted'.
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