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Why Would Anyone Want to Swing a Cat?

By Andy Simpson
Authors:
Andy Simpson
Why is bureaucracy known as red, not yellow or blue tape?What is haywire and why do we go it?Why is a yawn infection?Who was Parker and why is he so Nosy?These are just some of the burning issues that have been exercising the minds of Daily Mail readers in recent years, and 1001 of the most entertaining have been reproduced in this bumper collection.Not all of the questions featured will have been nagging away at you for years - the scrap metal value of the Eiffel Tower, for example; and some of the answers throw up intriguing alternatives (does the expression "peg out" have its origins in the game of cribbage or in grave digging practices?); but for those who are inveterate devourers of trivia teasers and fascinating facts, The Daily Mail's Answers to Correspondents is a veritable feast.
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Writing Tools

By Roy Peter Clark
Authors:
Roy Peter Clark
Tools Not Rules' says Roy Peter Clark, vice president and senior scholar at the Poynter Institute, the esteemed school for journalists and teachers of journalists. Clark believes that everyone can write well with the help of a handful of useful tools that he has developed over decades of writing and teaching. If you google 'Roy Peter Clark, Writing Tools', you'll get an astonishing 1.25 million hits. That's because journalists everywhere rely on his tips to help them write well every day - in fact he fields emails from around the world from grateful writers. 'Writing Tools' covers everything from the basics (Tool 5: Watch those Adverbs) to the more complex (Tool 34: Turn your notebook into a camera) and uses more than 300 examples from literature and journalism to illustrate the concepts. For students, aspiring novelists and writers of memos, emails, PowerPoint presentations and love letters, here are 50 indispensible, memorable and usable tools.

Why Is Yawning Contagious?

By Francesca Gould
Authors:
Francesca Gould
Everything you ever wanted to know about the human body - and some things you'd rather not...A wonderfully entertaining yet authoritative treasure trove of facts about our anatomy - it answers all the questions about our bodies we're usually too embarrassed to ask.· Why is yawning contagious? Some experts think that yawning may have developed as a means of communication. It may, for example, be a way of signalling to others that it's important to remain alert and stay awake in a certain situation. Another theory is that our early ancestors used it as part of their social behaviour, and as a way to help build a bond with the rest of the group.· Why are bogies green? When white blood cells meet germs, they make a large amount of an enzyme called myeloperoxidase, which is green because it contains a lot of iron. The colouration therefore comes from the iron.
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The Writer's Block

By Jason Rekulak
Authors:
Jason Rekulak
Anxious to write that Great American Novel but don't know where to begin? Help is on the way with our Writer's Block ! This guide to beating writer's block comes packaged in the shape of an actual block: 3" x 3" x 3", with 672 pages and more than 200 photographs throughout. Next time you're stuck, just flip open The Writer's Block to any page to find an idea or exercise that will jump-start your imagination. Many of these assignments come straight from the creative writing classes of celebrated novelists like Ethan Canin, Richard Price, Toni Morrison, and Kurt Vonnegut: Joyce Carol Oates explains how she uses running to destroy writer's block. Elmore Leonard describes how he often finds ideas just by reading the newspaper. E. Annie Proulx discusses finding inspiration at garage sales. Isabel Allende tells why she always begins a new novel on January 8th. John Irving explains why he prefers to write the last sentence first. Fresh, fun, and irreverent, The Writer's Block also features advice from contemporary editors and literary agents, lessons from the awful novels of Joan Collins and Robert James Waller, a filmography of movies concerning writer's block (e.g., The Shining, Barton Fink ), and countless other surprises. With this chunky little book at your side, you may never experience writer's block again!

Writing Your Dissertation, 3rd Edition

By Derek Swetnam, Ruth Swetnam
Authors:
Derek Swetnam, Ruth Swetnam
Gives you the tools to produce a first class dissertationThis book gives you the confidence, tools and techniques to produce a first-class dissertation. It offers practical guidelines to planning realistic timetables and structuring every aspect of your work. Find out how to avoid common mistakes and the best way to present your work, and even how to assess your dissertation in the same way as a university or college tutor does.

The Writer's Legal Companion

By Brad Bunnin, Peter Beren
Authors:
Brad Bunnin, Peter Beren
For most writers, negotiating the legal maze of publishing is as challenging as getting their words in print. This comprehensive guide offers writers solid advice on all aspects of publishing law. Candid and readable, it cover everything from copyrights and taxes to libel laws, subsidiary rights, and the obscure clauses in publisher's contracts. As important resource for editors, agents, or anyone in print or electronic publishing, this updated third edition of The Writer's Legal Companion features essential, irreplacable information on: publishing contracts, good and bad clauses libel, slander, and invasion of privacy issues electronic rights conditions the business of publishing, including marketing and selling books magazine publishing collaboration and agents' agreements federal income tax considerations for freelance writers copyright legalities Whether you write an occasional magazine article or publish a new book every year, The Writers Legal Companion will save you time, and reduce you anxiety over the business of publishing.
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