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The Doors

By Greil Marcus
Authors:
Greil Marcus
A fan from the moment the Doors' first album took over KMPX, the revolutionary FM rock & roll station in San Francisco, Greil Marcus saw the band many times at the legendary Fillmore Auditorium and the Avalon Ballroom in 1967. Five years later it was all over. Forty years after the singer Jim Morrison was found dead in Paris and the group disbanded, one could drive from here to there, changing from one FM pop station to another, and be all but guaranteed to hear two, three, four Doors songs in an hour,every hour. Whatever the demands in the music, they remained unsatisfied, in the largest sense unfinished, and absolutely alive. There have been many books on the Doors. This is the first to bypass their myth, their mystique, and the death cult of both Jim Morrison and the era he was made to personify, and focus solely on the music. It is a story untold all these years later, it is a new story.

Digital Photography

By Henry Horenstein
Authors:
Henry Horenstein
The recent boom in digital camera sales has dramatically revived interest in photography. More people are taking pictures than ever before, from serious hobbyists using digital SLRs to rank amateurs using cell phones. Most photography schools now teach both "wet" and digital photography, but many programs are abandoning their darkrooms entirely, requiring students to only use digital cameras. In DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY: A BASIC MANUAL, bestselling author Henry Horenstein provides step-by-step instructions, full-page prints, and line illustrations to illuminate every aspect of digital photography, from exposure controls and shutter speed to image editing, printing methods, and even file storage. Based in the same clear and comprehensive teaching techniques that made Horenstein's Black and White Photography a perennial classic, DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY is essential reading for photo enthusiasts who wish to bridge traditional darkroom technique with the digital present and future.

Dogs In Vogue

By Judith Watt
Authors:
Judith Watt
The next best thing to having the world at your feet is to have a dog at your heels,' observed Vogue in 1930. Since 1909, dogs have had a role to play in the glamorous story of Vogue, as companions to style icons and royalty, society leaders, artists and models. Portrayed here are dogs in their own right and dogs with their people. Here are stout-hearted wire-haired terriers; elegant sighthounds; diminutive pugs and Pekinese; poodles, the epitome of French chic; and gentle spaniels and retrievers. The dogs that have appeared in VOGUE have inspired brilliant articles by writers such as Dorothy Parker and Lesley Blanch. Dogs have been painted by many of VOGUE's greatest artists, from Douglas Pollard to René Bouët-Willaumez. This stunning book features dazzling, rarely seen photographs by Cecil Beaton, Irving Penn, Lord Snowdon, David Bailey, Mario Testino and more.

The Directory Of Classical Themes

By Denys Parsons
Authors:
Denys Parsons
Have you ever had a classical tune buzzing round your head and not been able to identify it? In The Directory of Classical Themes, with no greater musical knowledge than the ability to hum the tune, you will be able to find it. Denys Parsons discovered that the only necessary feature to distinguish any number of different themes was the up-and-down pattern of the melody. This enabled him to compile a reference work that is incredibly easy to use. Practically every well-known classical theme from the 16th century onwards is found in these pages. It can be used to find the composer, identify the theme and movement of a sonata, symphony or concerto and to check the opus number or key of a work you already know.

Da Capo Best Music Writing 2005

By JT LeRoy
Authors:
JT LeRoy
Da Capo Best Music Writing has become one of the most eagerly awaited annuals of them all. Celebrating the year in music writing by gathering a rich array of essays, missives, and musings on every style of music from rock to hip-hop to R&B to jazz to pop to blues and more, it is essential reading for anyone who loves great music and accomplished writing. Scribes of every imaginable sort-novelists, poets, journalists, musicians-are gathered to create a multi-voiced snapshot of the year in music writing that, like the music it illuminates, is every bit as thrilling as it is riveting.Past writers have included:Elizabeth MEndez Berry * Ta-Nehisi Coates * Michael Corcoran * Robbie Fulks * Michaelangelo Matos * Alex Ross * Roni Sarig * Joel Selvin * Tour8E * Lynn Hirschberg * Chuck Klosterman * Elizabeth Gilbert * Jay McInerney * Elvis Costello * Susan Orlean * Jonathan Lethem * David Rakoff * Mike Doughty * Lorraine Ali * Greil Marcus * Richard Meltzer * Robert Gordon * Sarah Vowell * Nick Tosches * Anthony DeCurtis * William Gay * Whitney Balliett * Lester Bangs * Rosanne Cash * Eddie Dean * Selwyn Seyfu Hinds * Kate Sullivan * Alec Wilkinson * David Hadju * Lenny Kaye * The Onion * Mark Jacobson * Gary Giddins * John Leland * Luc Sante * Monica Kendrick * Kalefa Sanneh

The Dark Stuff

By Iggy Pop, Nick Kent
Authors:
Iggy Pop, Nick Kent
A smart, scathing look at the most hell-bent performers of our time: Here are profiles of everyone you'd expect (and a few you wouldn't)-Brian Wilson, Miles Davis, Jerry Lee Lewis, Roy Orbison, Sid Vicious, and Kurt Cobain. "Kent matters because he wrote about rock better than anyone before or since." -Tony Parsons, The Daily Telegraph

Da Capo Best Music Writing 2002

By Jonathan Lethem, Paul Bresnick
Authors:
Jonathan Lethem, Paul Bresnick
It's here: the third and latest volume in the series that you have come to rely upon for your music-reading fix. The 2002 volume will celebrate the year's best writing about music and its culture, as selected by Jonathan Lethem, best-selling novelist, music hound, and self-confessed closet rock-writer. With pieces on a dazzling array of topics from more than a hundred sources, the collection brings you remarkable essays by journalists and authors who are as serious about writing as they are about music. It's required reading for anyone who loves either art. Past contributors have included: David Rakoff Mike Doughty Lorraine Ali Greil Marcus Richard Meltzer Robert Gordon Sarah Vowell Nick Tosches Anthony DeCurtis William Gay Whitney Balliett Lester Bangs Rosanne Cash Susan Orlean Eddie Dean Selwyn Seyfu Hinds Alec Wilkinson David Hajdu

Da Capo Best Music Writing 2001

By Ben Schafer, Nick Hornby
Authors:
Ben Schafer, Nick Hornby

The Da Capo Jazz And Blues Lover's Guide To The U.S.

By Christiane Bird
Authors:
Christiane Bird
Where did Charlie Parker first play with Dizzy Gillespie? What are the coolest clubs in Chicago? Which city has the largest jazz museum? Where is Howlin' Wolf buried? The answers can be found in The Da Capo Jazz and Blues Lover's Guide to the U.S. , an insiders look at all the places where jazz and blues live, from national clubs to unmarked holes in the wall, in twenty-five cities and the Mississippi Delta. With the most up-to-date listings for festivals, historic theatres, record stores, and radio stations-plus anecdotes from club owners and musicians,this is the essential "where-to" for jazz and blues fans everywhere.

The Da Capo Book of Rock & Roll

By Clinton Heylin
Authors:
Clinton Heylin
Since the early days of rock 'n' roll,since Elvis Presley came out of Memphis to startle the world,a whole body of writing has grown up around it, from the album notes to obituaries, from on-the-road insider tales to dissections of the meaning behind the meaning. The Da Capo Book of Rock & Roll Writing presents the very best of this writing, on the best of the music: the Beatles, Elvis, Bruce Springsteen, the Sex Pistols, Bob Dylan, Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, and countless others. Part history, part literature, part reference book,part hyperbole and part disillusionment, The Da Capo Book of Rock & Roll Writing is an extraordinary tribute to one of the great creative achievements of the century: rock & roll. And where else can you find "The First Tycoon of Teen" by Tom Wolfe "In Which Yet Another Pompous Blowhard Purports to Possess the True Meaning of Punk Rock" by Lester Bangs "What the Sixties Had That the Eighties Don't Have" by Paul Williams "You and the Boss" by Tama Janowitz

Doo-dah!

By Ken Emerson
Authors:
Ken Emerson
Stephen Foster (1826-1864) was America's first great songwriter and the first to earn his living solely through his music. He composed some 200 songs, including such classics as "Oh! Susanna," Jeanie with the Light Brown Hair," "Old Folks at Home (Way down upon the Swanee River)," and "Camptown Races (Doo-dah! Doo-dah!)." He virtually invented popular music as we recognize it to this day, yet he died at age thirty-seven, a forgotten and nearly penniless alcoholic on the Bowery. The author reveals Foster's contradictory life while disclosing how the dynamics of nineteenth-century industrialization, westward expansion, the Gold Rush, slavery, and the Civil War infused his music, and how that music influenced popular culture.

Dance Of The Infidels

By Francis Paudras
Authors:
Francis Paudras
What Charlie Parker was to the saxophone, Bud Powell (1924-1966) was to the piano: No jazz pianist can rival his brilliance. But his life was filled with tragedy, including years of electroshock therapy in psychiatric institutions, illnesses, physical and mental abuse from people who fed him dangerous drugs to control him, and the indifference of his contemporaries to his genius. Francis Paudras, a young jazz fan who met Powell in the late 1950s, released him from his unfavourable surroundings, encouraged him to create some of his finest music, and took care of him as if he were his child. Powell's story, Dance of the Infidels, is one of the most moving of jazz memoirs,and served as the basis for Bertrand Tavernier's film 'Round Midnight, starring Dexter Gordon. Here, for the first time in English, is a portrait of a friendship as surprising and heartbreaking as Bud Powell's timeless music.

The Devil's Music

By Giles Oakley
Authors:
Giles Oakley
Superbly researched and vividly written, The Devil's Music is one of the only books to trace the rise and development of the blues both in relation to other forms of black music and in the context of American social history as experienced by African Americans. From its roots in the turn-of-the-century honky-tonks of New Orleans and the barrelhouses and plantations of the Mississippi Delta to modern legends such as John Lee Hooker and B. B. King, the blues comes alive here through accounts by the blues musicians themselves and those who knew them. Throughout this wide-ranging and fascinating book, Giles Oakley describes the texture of the life that made the blues possible, and the changing attitudes toward the music. The Devil's Music is a wholehearted and loving examination of one of America's most powerful traditions.

Dexter Gordon

By Stan Britt
Authors:
Stan Britt
Described by Leonard Feather as "one of the most influential saxophonists of the bop era," Dexter Gordon has been a recognized master for over four decades. This new biography traces his career from his early stints with Lionel Hampton and Louis Armstrong, through his time with the bop big band of Billy Eckstine and his sparring partnership with fellow tenor-player Wardell Gray in Los Angeles, to his self-exile in Denmark, and his triumphant return to New York in 1976, an event that decisively shaped the still strong bebop revival. Stan Britt devotes chapters to Gordon's acclaimed performance in the movie 'Round Midnight, for which he received an Academy Award nomination, along with extended discussions of his recording legacy and an analysis of his unmistakable tenor sound and style. With a notated discography and a keen appreciation of Dexter's warm, ironic personality, this biography adds another dimension to our understanding of one of the coolest,and tallest,figures of jazz.

Django Reinhardt

By Charles Delaunay
Authors:
Charles Delaunay
No European jazz musician has so enchanted the word as Django Reinhardt, the gypsy guitarist whose recording with Stephane Grappelly and the Hot Club of France have meant "The Thirties" to several generations of listeners, influencing musicians as far afield as Larry Coryell, Leon Redbone, Eddy Lang, and Charlie Christian.This is the only full-length study of Django ever published in English, an unforgettable portrait of a wild and independent figure who never learned to read or write (friends forged his autographs), exasperated those people who lived by schedules, gambled away a week's salary in a night, but who played the guitar like no one before or since. The distinguished French critic Charles Delaunay, who knows more about Django than anyone alive, here provides not only the familiar outline of a life- the childhood travels in gypsy caravans, the fire that left Django with a crippled hand, the legendary temper and generosity- but he also collected scores of anecdotes about the sensitivity and musical gifts that were the basis for Django's appearance as a character in Jean Cocteau's Les Enfants Terribles. Who else but Django could charm his way out of a jail sentence by serenading the police officer with his guitar?The comprehensive discography at the back of the book completes Delaunay's picture of this "misrepresented and fantastic creature, at once so captivating and so divorced from the contentions of his age."
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