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Molecules

By Nick Mann, Theodore Gray
Authors:
Nick Mann, Theodore Gray
In his highly anticipated sequel to The Elements, Theodore Gray demonstrates how the elements of the periodic table combine to form the molecules that make up our world.Everything physical is made up of the elements and the infinite variety of molecules they form when they combine with each other. In Molecules, Theodore Gray takes the next step in the grand story that began with the periodic table in his best-selling book, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe. Here, he explores through fascinating stories and trademark stunning photography the most interesting, essential, useful, and beautiful of the millions of chemical structures that make up every material in the world.Gray begins with an explanation of how atoms bond to form molecules and compounds, as well as the difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. He then goes on to explore the vast array of materials molecules can create, including: soaps and solvents; goops and oils; rocks and ores; ropes and fibers; painkillers and dangerous drugs; sweeteners; perfumes and stink bombs; colors and pigments; and controversial compounds including asbestos, CFCs, and thimerosal.Big, gorgeous photographs, as well as diagrams of the compounds and their chemical bonds, rendered with never before seen beauty, fill the pages and capture molecules in their various states.As he did in The Elements, Gray shows us molecules as we've never seen them before. It's the perfect book for his loyal fans who've been eager for more and for anyone fascinated with the mysteries of the material world.
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Mismatch

By Ronald Giphart, Mark van Vugt
Authors:
Ronald Giphart, Mark van Vugt
Our brains evolved to solve the survival problems of our Stone Age ancestors, so when faced with modern day situations that are less extreme, they often encounter a mismatch. Our primitive brains put us on the wrong foot by responding to stimuli that - in prehistoric times - would have prompted behaviour that was beneficial. If you've ever felt an anxious fight or flight response to a presenting at a board meeting, equivalent to facing imminent death by sabre-toothed tiger, then you have experienced a mismatch.Mismatch is about the clash between our biology and our culture. It is about the dramatic contrast between the first few million years of human history - when humans lived as hunters and gatherers in small-scale societies - and the past twelve thousand years following the agricultural revolution which have led us to comfortable lives in a very different social structure. Has this rapid transition been good for us? How do we, using our primitive minds, try to survive in a modern information society that radically changes every ten years or so?Ronald Giphart and Mark van Vugt show that humans have changed their environment so drastically that the chances for mismatch have significantly increased, and these conflicts can have profound consequences.Reviewed through mismatch glasses, social, societal, and technological trends can be better understood, ranging from the popularity of Facebook and internet porn, to the desire for cosmetic surgery, to our attitudes towards refugees.Mismatches can also affect our physical and psychological well-being, in terms of our attitudes to happiness, physical exercise, choosing good leaders, or finding ways to feel better at home or work.Finally, Mismatch gives us an insight into politics and policy which could enable governments, institutions and businesses to create an environment better suited to human nature, its potential and its constraints.This book is about converting mismatches into matches. The better your life is matched to how your mind operates, the greater your chances of leading a happy, healthy and productive life.
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  • Maybe This Christmas

    By Jennifer Snow
    Authors:
    Jennifer Snow
    Emma Lewis had once been an Olympic Gold medalist snowboarder, but an accident on the slopes left her unable to continue with the sport. Now, she works as a physical therapist, helping other athletes recover from injury. When her best friend, Asher Westmore, gets injured in the middle of the hockey season, she's determined to get him back on the ice as soon as possible. But Asher's spirit needs the most therapy, and Emma wants to be one to heal him on all levels. She's always loved Asher, and it seems that now may be the right time for them--if only she can convince him. Asher Westmore is living his dream and playing for the New Jersey Devils, but torn ligaments in his leg leave him benched for the rest of the season.His best friend Emma may be the only one who can help him get through it--that is if he doesn't ruin everything by falling in love with her.

    My Turn

    By Johan Cruyff
    Authors:
    Johan Cruyff
    Johan Cruyff embodied a footballing philosophy that now dominates coaching and playing styles in all the leading club sides around the world. You can dispute whether Cruyff was the greatest player ever- he was certainly one of the top three- but he is undoubtedly the player who single-handedly most changed the nature of the game. My Turn tells the story of Cruyff's remarkable career, built on the techniques he learned playing in the streets of postwar Amsterdam while hoping to be noticed by the city's most famous club, Ajax. He would eventually inspire that team to eight league championships and three European cups. He won his first of three Ballons d'Or in 1971 at age 24. In 1973, Cruyff was sold to Barcelona for a then-world-record transfer fee. He led the Catalans to victory in La Liga for the first time since 1960, and went on to leave a lasting mark on Spanish soccer. In the 1974 World Cup, Cruyff propelled the Dutch team to the final for the first time.Cruyff's lasting influence, however, is not in the medals he won, but in the style of play he epitomized and then applied to the Barcelona and Ajax teams he coached. His vision of Total Football" transformed the way soccer was played, and its dazzling fluidity became the basis of the most admired sides around the world. He was the sport's uncompromising genius on and off the field of play.

    The Mice Who Sing For Sex

    By Lliana Bird, Jack Lewis
    Authors:
    Lliana Bird, Jack Lewis
    Lliana Bird and Dr Jack Lewis tackle the strange and surreal phenomena from the depths of the oceans to the limits of the far flung universe; the dark corners of your laundry basket to the forgotten compartments of your fridge. Packed with unusual facts and stories of the absurd each of the fascinating insights is told with the Geek Chic team's inimitable humour and wit.An hilarious exploration all things bizarre from the world of science, The Mice Who Sing for Sex takes on weighty issues including heavy metal loving sharks, life-threatening skinny jeans, our impending jellyfish apocalypse and of course, the singing mice of the title.
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    Monsters

    By Ed Regis
    Authors:
    Ed Regis
    Oh, the humanity!" Radio reporter Herbert Morrison's words on witnessing the destruction of the Hindenburg are etched in our collective memory. Yet, while the Hindenburg ,like the Titanic ,is a symbol of the technological hubris of a bygone era, we seem to have forgotten the lessons that can be learned from the infamous 1937 zeppelin disaster.Zeppelins were steerable balloons of highly flammable, explosive gas, but the sheer magic of seeing one of these behemoths afloat in the sky cast an irresistible spell over all those who saw them. In Monsters , Ed Regis explores the question of how a technology now so completely invalidated (and so fundamentally unsafe) ever managed to reach the high-risk level of development that it did. Through the story of the zeppelin's development, Regis examines the perils of what he calls pathological technologies",inventions whose sizeable risks are routinely minimized as a result of their almost mystical allure.Such foolishness is not limited to the industrial age: newer examples of pathological technologies include the US government's planned use of hydrogen bombs for large-scale geoengineering projects the phenomenally risky, expensive, and ultimately abandoned Superconducting Super Collider and the exotic interstellar propulsion systems proposed for DARPA's present-day 100 Year Starship project. In case after case, the romantic appeal of foolishly ambitious technologies has blinded us to their shortcomings, dangers, and costs.Both a history of technological folly and a powerful cautionary tale for future technologies and other grandiose schemes, Monsters is essential reading for experts and citizens hoping to see new technologies through clear eyes.

    Moon Santa Fe, Taos & Albuquerque (Fourth Edition)

    By Zora O'Neill
    Authors:
    Zora O'Neill
    New Mexico native Zora O'Neill shares her appreciation for the Land of Enchantment in this full-colour guide, from exploring the Acoma Pueblo,a 12th-century Native American settlement built upon a 367-foot mesa,to hitting the slopes at Taos Ski Valley. O'Neill offers a variety of trip strategies accompanied by vibrant photos and helpful maps, such as Weekend Getaways, American Indian Heritage, and Not Just Hot Tamales,a guide to sampling the tastiest examples of the region's distinctive cuisine. Full of tips on hiking aspen-covered mountainsides, wandering among crumbling Franciscan churches, and checking out the area's thriving art scene, Moon Santa Fe, Taos, & Albuquerque gives travellers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience.

    Moon Spotlight Salvador & Bahia

    By Michael Sommers
    Authors:
    Michael Sommers
    Moon Spotlight Salvador & Bahia is an 85-page compact guide to the best of Salvador and Bahia. Brazil resident and magazine correspondent Michael Sommers offers his firsthand advice on what sights are must-sees, and sightseeing highlights maps make planning your time easy. This lightweight guide is packed with recommendations on sights, entertainment, shopping, recreation, accommodations, food, and transportation. Helpful maps guide travellers through these two historic highlights of Brazil.This full-colour Spotlight guidebook is excerpted from Moon Brazil.

    My Spirit Took You In

    By Christine Wicker, Louise Troh
    Authors:
    Christine Wicker, Louise Troh
    Louise Troh,fiancée of Thomas Eric Duncan, the first man ever to die of Ebola in America,breaks her silence about her experience in this deeply moving memoir, chronicling the decade-long love story that starts in Liberia and ends in an isolation ward in Dallas, Texas.

    The Man Who Touched His Own Heart

    By Rob Dunn
    Authors:
    Rob Dunn
    The Man Who Touched His Own Heart tells the raucous, gory, mesmerizing story of the heart, from the first "explorers" who dug up cadavers and plumbed their hearts' chambers, through the first heart surgeries-which had to be completed in three minutes before death arrived-to heart transplants and the latest medical efforts to prolong our hearts' lives, almost defying nature in the process.Thought of as the seat of our soul, then as a mysteriously animated object, the heart is still more a mystery than it is understood. Why do most animals only get one billion beats? (And how did modern humans get to over two billion-effectively letting us live out two lives?) Why are sufferers of gingivitis more likely to have heart attacks? Why do we often undergo expensive procedures when cheaper ones are just as effective? What do Da Vinci, Mary Shelley, and contemporary Egyptian archaeologists have in common? And what does it really feel like to touch your own heart, or to have someone else's beating inside your chest? Rob Dunn's fascinating history of our hearts brings us deep inside the science, history, and stories of the four chambers we depend on most.

    Moon Maryland

    By Michaela Riva Gaaserud
    Authors:
    Michaela Riva Gaaserud
    Area native Michaela Riva Gaaserud provides travellers with an insider's perspective on one of the nation's most historically significant states. An experienced guidebook author, Gaaserud offers up original trip ideas to help visitors make the most of their time, such as Charm City: Two Days in Baltimore. With comprehensive coverage for all interests,from seeing the wild ponies of Assateague Island to visiting Antietam National Battlefield to strolling Embassy Row in Washington DC, Moon Maryland gives travellers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience.

    My Manager and Other Animals

    By Richard Robinson
    Authors:
    Richard Robinson
    Deep down, we're just like animals. Some of us are selfish like apes. Some are chaotic like ants. . . And somehow the two clash and coalesce in 'antagonistic harmony'. A fascinating look at the evolutionary psychology, instincts and tactics of the workplace.My Manager & Other Animals examines the evolutionary psychology of work, focusing on the office, workshop, corporation or government department, and the complex and fascinating evolutionary tactics that have developed to deal with working life.37 years ago Richard Dawkins wrote The Selfish Gene and it didn't take long for the business community to latch on to the 'selfish' part and adopt it as an industry standard. After all, it fitted in with the notion that, since we are all descended from apes, we should be like them: selfish, aggressive and competitive. More recently, astounding discoveries in human and animal behaviour (particularly ants) have shown that, in all animals, cooperation and altruism is more common than we think and more useful than we could imagine. It seems we contain an inner ape and an inner ant. How confusing; they seem like opposites, because co-operation means helping others, competition means swatting them. What are we, ape or ant? This book shows that ant and ape are both important. Co-operation without leadership is random, leadership without co-operation is slavery. The result of these two colliding is the mad mad mad world of work and life, lovingly described in the book.
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    The Magnificent Masters

    By Gil Capps
    Authors:
    Gil Capps
    The 1975 Masters Tournament always seemed destined for the record books. A veritable Hall of Fame list of competitors had gathered that spring in Augusta, Georgia, for the game's most famous event, including Arnold Palmer, Tom Watson, Gary Player, Lee Trevino, Hale Irwin, Billy Casper, and Sam Snead. The lead-up had been dominated by Lee Elder, the first black golfer ever invited to the exclusive club's tourney. But by the weekend, the tournament turned into a showdown between the three heavyweights of the time: Jack Nicklaus, Johnny Miller, and Tom Weiskopf. Never before had golf's top three players of the moment summoned the best golf of their lives in the same major championship. Their back-and-forth battle would rivet the sporting world and dramatically culminate in one of the greatest finishes in golf history.In The Magnificent Masters , Gil Capps, a twenty-two-year veteran of the golf industry with NBC Sports and Golf Channel, recaptures hole-by-hole the thrilling drama of this singular event during golf's golden era, from the media-crazed build-up and intertwined careers of the three combatants to the tournament's final dramatic putts that would change the game of golf forever.
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    The Monkey's Voyage

    By Alan de Queiroz
    Authors:
    Alan de Queiroz
    Throughout the world, closely related species are found on landmasses separated by wide stretches of ocean. What explains these far-flung distributions? Why are such species found where they are across the Earth?Since the discovery of plate tectonics, scientists have conjectured that plants and animals were scattered over the globe by riding pieces of ancient supercontinents as they broke up. In the past decade, however, that theory has foundered, as the genomic revolution has made reams of new data available. And the data has revealed an extraordinary, stranger-than-fiction story that has sparked a scientific upheaval.In The Monkey's Voyage , biologist Alan de Queiroz describes the radical new view of how fragmented distributions came into being: frogs and mammals rode on rafts and icebergs, tiny spiders drifted on storm winds, and plant seeds were carried in the plumage of sea-going birds to create the map of life we see today. In other words, these organisms were not simply constrained by continental fate they were the makers of their own geographic destiny. And as de Queiroz shows, the effects of oceanic dispersal have been crucial in generating the diversity of life on Earth, from monkeys and guinea pigs in South America to beech trees and kiwi birds in New Zealand. By toppling the idea that the slow process of continental drift is the main force behind the odd distributions of organisms, this theory highlights the dynamic and unpredictable nature of the history of life.In the tradition of John McPhee's Basin and Range , The Monkey's Voyage is a beautifully told narrative that strikingly reveals the importance of contingency in history and the nature of scientific discovery.

    Moon Florida Keys (2nd ed)

    By Laura Martone
    Authors:
    Laura Martone
    World traveller Laura Martone shares the best ways to experience the Florida Keys, from diving the fascinating underwater coral reefs and shipwrecks of Key Largo to hiking and camping in the less touristy Middle Keys. Martone offers unique trip ideas for a variety of travellers, including Historic Architecture, Underwater Journey, and Romantic Key West Getaway. Complete with information on taking trolley tours, swimming with dolphins, and attending festivals like the Key Largo Pirates Fest, Moon Florida Keys gives travellers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience. Coverage includes:Miami and the EvergladesKey LargoIslamoradaMarathon and the Middle KeysBig Pine and the Lower KeysKey West

    Mad Science 2

    By Theodore Gray
    Authors:
    Theodore Gray
    Best-selling author Theodore Gray is back with all-new, spectacular experiments that demonstrate basic principles of chemistry and physics in thrilling, and memorable ways. For nearly a decade, Theodore Gray has been demonstrating basic principles of chemistry and physics through exciting, sometimes daredevil experiments that he executes, photographs, and writes about for his monthly Popular Science column 'Gray Matter.'Theo Gray's Mad Science: Experiments You Can Do at Home, But Probably Shouldn't, published by Black Dog in 2009, collected Gray's Popular Science columns, along with hundreds of photographs, many of which were not published with the original columns.Now comes the second volume of mad-scientist experiments, which includes more dramatic, enlightening, and sometimes daring demonstrations in which Gray dips his hand into molten lead to demonstrate the Leidenfrost effect; crushes a tomato between two small magnets to demonstrate the power of neodymium-iron-boron magnets; and creates trinkets out of solid mercury to demonstrate how the state of matter depends very much on the temperature at which it exists.Other experiments include:A foil boat floating on an invisible sea!DIY X-ray photos!A bacon lance that cuts steel!Charging a smart phone with apples and pennies!And dozens more!

    Memoirs of an Addicted Brain

    By Marc Lewis
    Authors:
    Marc Lewis
    Marc Lewis's relationship with drugs began in a New England boarding school where, as a bullied and homesick fifteen-year-old, he made brief escapes from reality by way of cough medicine, alcohol, and marijuana. In Berkeley, California, in its hippie heyday, he found methamphetamine and LSD and heroin he sniffed nitrous oxide in Malaysia and frequented Calcutta's opium dens. Ultimately, though, his journey took him where it takes most addicts: into a life of desperation, deception, and crime.But unlike most addicts, Lewis recovered to become a developmental psychologist and researcher in neuroscience. In Memoirs of an Addicted Brain , he applies his professional expertise to a study of his former self, using the story of his own journey through addiction to tell the universal story of addictions of every kind.

    Mean Genes

    By Jay Phelan, Terry Burnham
    Authors:
    Jay Phelan, Terry Burnham
    Why do we want- and why do we do- so many things that are bad for us? And how can we stop? In Mean Genes economist Terry Burnham and biologist Jay Phelan offer advice on how to conquer our own worst enemy- our survival-minded genes. Having evolved in a time of scarcity, when our ancestors struggled to survive in the wild, our genes are poorly adapted to the convenience of modern society. They compel us to overeat, spend our whole paycheck, and cheat on our spouses. But knowing how they work, Burnham and Phelan show that we can trick these "mean genes" into submission and cultivate behaviours that will help us lead better lives. A lively, humorous guide to our evolutionary heritage, Mean Genes illuminates how we can use an understanding of our biology to beat our instincts- before they beat us.

    The Main Street Moment AFSCME Edition (Special Edition)

    By Gerald W. McEntee, Lee Saunders
    Authors:
    Gerald W. McEntee, Lee Saunders

    Moon San Juan Islands (4th ed)

    By Don Pitcher
    Authors:
    Don Pitcher
    Writer and photographer Don Pitcher introduces travellers to the best of the San Juan Islands, from their luxurious inns and upscale restaurants to their evergreen forests and rocky shorelines. Don is the essential tour guide to this popular getaway destination, providing itineraries such as Romantic San Juans, Camping with the Kids, and Exploring the Outer Islands. Complete with details on activities including whale-watching, kayaking, sailing, hiking, and diving, Moon San Juan Islands gives travellers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience.