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Will's Red Coat

By Tom Ryan
Authors:
Tom Ryan
Tom Ryan touched the hearts of thousands when he wrote about his intrepid little dog Atticus and their quest to climb 48 mountains to raise money in memory of a friend who had died of cancer. But nothing touched his fans more than the story of Will, the old, gruff dog whom Tom and Atticus brought into their home in May 2012, believing that they were simply doing a good deed by helping nurse an old dog through his final days. With the right attention and affection in a loving home, Will bounced back and lived for two more years - to the ripe old age of 17 - and helped Tom understand a great deal about aging, how to live a full life and make the best of our days. In Will's Red Coat, Tom tells the story of his misadventures with Will and how he nursed him back to health and a good life.
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What the Dickens?!

By Bryan Kozlowski
Authors:
Bryan Kozlowski
GRAB A BUMPER, FORGET YOUR FANTEEGS, AND ROAM AT A FOOT-PACE THROUGH THE TWISTY ALLEYWAYS OF THE VICTORIAN VERNACULAR!What larks! Dive into the world of literature's ultimate wordsmith, Charles Dickens, in this literary romp through his finest quips, barbs, and turns of phrase.Featuring 200 of Dickens' best-loved words, drawn from his fifteen novels and hundreds of short stories, What the Dickens?! is full of period-appropriate definitions, pithy commentary, and charming illustrations. Perfect for word nerds and book lovers of all ages, this volume will have you dragging your friends to the hippo-comedietta and bonneting your anti-Pickwickian adversaries like a proper Victorian in no time!

Words and Rules

By Steven Pinker
Authors:
Steven Pinker
How does language work? How do children learn their mother tongue? Why do languages change over time, making Shakespearean English difficult for us and Chaucer's English almost incomprehensible? Why do languages have so many quirks and irregularities? Are they all fundamentally alike? How are new words created? Where in the brain does language reside?In Words and Rules , Steven Pinker answers these and many other questions. His book shares the wit and style of his classic, The Language Instinct , but explores language in a completely different way. In Words and Rules , Pinker explains the profound mysteries of language by picking a deceptively simple phenomenon and examining it from every angle. The phenomenon,regular and irregular verbs,connects an astonishing array of topics in the sciences and humanities: the history of languages, the theories of Noam Chomsky and his critics the attempts to simulate language using computer simulations of neural networks the illuminating errors of children as they begin to speak the nature of human concepts the peculiarities of the English language major ideas in the history of Western philosophy the latest techniques in identifying genes and imaging the living brain.Pinker makes sense of all of this with the help of a single, powerful idea: that language comprises a mental dictionary of memorized words and a mental grammar of creative rules. The idea extends beyond language and offers insight into the very nature of the human mind. This is a sparkling, eye-opening and utterly original book by one of the world's leading cognitive scientists.

We Hope You Like This Song

By Bree Housley
Authors:
Bree Housley
From fourth grade onward, shy, nervous Bree Housley and fearless, outgoing Shelly were an inseparable, albeit unlikely, pair. Their friendship survived everything from the awkward years of junior high to the transformative upheavals of early adulthood,until, at the young age of 25, Shelly lost her life to complications caused by Preeclampsia. We Hope You Like This Song is a tribute to the ineffable, incomparable bond that we call friendship, and a celebration of living life to the fullest. Housley recounts how she and her sister found a way to keep Shelly's memory alive,by spending a year doing crazy things that Shelly would have done, like giving Valentines to strangers, singing at a karaoke bar, and letting her boyfriend pick out her outfits for a week. In the process, she paints a vivid, often hilarious, portrait of her fun-loving, social butterfly best friend and the many adventures they had growing up together in'80s and '90s small-town America. Sweet, poignant, and yet somehow laugh-out-loud funny, We Hope You Like This Song is a touching story of love, loss, and the honoring of a friendship after it's gone.

West By West

By Jerry West, Jonathan Coleman
Authors:
Jerry West, Jonathan Coleman
He is one of basketball's towering figures: 'Mr. Clutch,' who mesmerized his opponents and fans. The coach who began the Lakers' resurgence in the 1970s. The general manager who helped bring 'Showtime' to Los Angeles, creating a championship-winning force that continues to this day. Now, for the first time, the legendary Jerry West tells his story - from his tough childhood in West Virginia, to his unbelievable college success at West Virginia University, his 40-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers and his relationships with NBA legends like Bill Russell, Wilt Chamberlain, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Magic Johnson, Shaquille O'Neal, and Kobe Bryant. Unsparing in its self-assessment and honesty, WEST BY WEST is far more than a sports memoir: it is a profound confession and a magnificent inspiration

The Whole Damn Deal

By Kathryn J. McGarr
Authors:
Kathryn J. McGarr
Robert S. Strauss was for many decades the quintessential Democratic power broker. Born to a poor Jewish family in West Texas, he founded the law firm that became Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld, and,while forever changing the nature of the Washington law firm,worked as chairman of the Democratic National Committee, special trade representative, ambassador to the Soviet Union and then Russia, and an advisor to presidents. As former first lady Barbara Bush wrote of Strauss in her memoir: He is absolutely the most amazing politician. He is everybody's friend and, if he chooses, could sell you the paper off your own wall." But it isn't the positions Strauss held that make his story fascinating it is what he represented about the culture of Washington in his day. He was a master of the art of knowing everyone who mattered and getting things done. Based on exclusive access to Strauss, The Whole Damn Deal brings to life a vanished epoch of working behind the scenes, political deal making, and successful bipartisanship in Washington.

West of the West

By Mark Arax
Authors:
Mark Arax
Teddy Roosevelt once exclaimed,"When I am in California, I am not in the West. I am west of the West,&rdquo and in this book, Mark Arax spends four years travelling up and down the Golden State to explore its singular place in the world. This is California beyond the clichés. This is California as only a native son, deep in the dust, could draw it. Compelling, lyrical, and ominous, his new collection finds a different drama rising out of each confounding landscape."The Summer of the Death of Hilario Guzman&rdquo has been praised as a"stunningly intimate&rdquo portrait of one immigrant family from Oaxaca, through harrowing border crossings and brutal raisin harvests. Down the road in the"Home Front,&rdquo right-wing Christians and Jews form a strange pact that tries to silence debate on the War on Terror, and a conflicted father loses not one but two sons in Iraq."The Last Okie in Lamont,&rdquo the inspiration for the town in the Grapes of Wrath , has but one Okie left, who tells Arax his life story as he drives to a funeral to bury one more Dust Bowl migrant."The Highlands of Humboldt&rdquo is a journey to marijuana growing capital of the U.S., where the old hippies are battling the new hippies over"pollution pot&rdquo and the local bank collects a mountain of cash each day, much of it redolent of cannabis. Arax pieces together the murder-suicide at the heart of a rotisserie chicken empire in"The Legend of Zankou,&rdquo a story included in the Best American Crime Reporting 2009 . And, in the end, he provides a moving epilogue to the murder of his own father, a crime in the California heartland finally solved after thirty years. In the finest tradition of Joan Didion, Arax combines journalism, essay, and memoir to capture social upheaval as well as the sense of being rooted in a community. Piece by piece, the stories become a whole, a stunning panorama of California, and America, in a new century.

What Else But Home

By Michael Rosen
Authors:
Michael Rosen
It started with a baseball game, when Michael Rosen's seven-year-old son Ripton invited some older boys over to his family's penthouse for snacks and Nintendo after joining their pick-up game in Tomkins Square Park. These visits became more frequent, and soon these boys, all black and Hispanic neighbours living in public and subsidized housing, became part of the Rosen's family. Over time Michael and his wife Leslie became like parents to these boys, and like parents everywhere, decided to help them succeed. So began a remarkable relationship between the Rosen family and five of the boys in particular, beautifully and movingly chronicled in What Else But Home ,a love story unlike any other, of a family that opened its door and heart and learned that whatever our racial and economic differences, baseball conquers all.

A Woman's Journal

By Running Press
Authors:
Running Press
Everyone needs an outlet for the thoughts and emotions that fill our daily lives. Sized to be portable, with lay-flat capability and a terrific new design and content, A Woman's Journal will again stand out as a diary writer's dream. Featuring quotes by history's most inspirational women, this journal is sure to unlock the mysterious territory that is a woman's mind.

A World I Loved

By Wadad Makdisi Cortas
Authors:
Wadad Makdisi Cortas
"This is my story, the story of an Arab woman. It is the story of a lost world. It begins in 1917, in Lebanon, when I was seven years old." So opens this haunting memoir by Wadad Makdisi Cortas, who eloquently describes her personal experience of the events that have fractured the Middle East over the past century. Through Cortas' eyes we experience life in Lebanon under the oppressive French mandate, and her desire to forge an Arab identity based on religious tolerance. We learn of her dedication to the education of women, and the difficulties that she overcomes to become the principal of a school in Lebanon. And in final, heartbreaking detail, we watch as her world becomes rent by the Palestine question," Western interference, and civil war. The World I Loved is both an elegy on Lebanon and her people, and the unforgettable story of one woman's journey from hope to sorrow as she bears painful witness to the undoing of her beloved country by sectarian and religious division.

Willie Nelson - An Epic Life

By Joe Nick Patoski
Authors:
Joe Nick Patoski
Willie Nelson has spent the last 30 years on that higher plane of celebrity where he signifies many things to many people--American folk hero, national treasure, Outlaw, tax dodger, country traditionalist, actor and friend of the farmer amongst many others. Acclaimed biographer and journalist Joe Nick Patoski offers a frank and thorough portrait, adding some surprising insight on this beloved performer. From his humble beginnings in Waco, TX, cared for by his grandparents, to learning to play guitar at 6 and wrote his first song at 7 to his remarkable rise to legendary status as a genre-bending music maker and a bona fide Hollywood darling, Patoski draws from his own association with Nelson, a relationship that began in the 1970s when Patoski began writing about the man and his music. Why does Nelson keep going down the road, steady as a mountain stream, creating an illusion for the millions that sit in awe of him as he sings the same repertoire night after night? With relish, Willie delves into these questions and more as Patoski reveals the true motivations for the Texanmost Texan.

When I Grow Up

By Bernice Rubens
Authors:
Bernice Rubens
In a rare foray outside that natural home, Booker Prize-winner Bernice Rubens penned these memoirs 'while I still have a memory'. Poignantly, the highly-acclaimed author, literary bon-vivante and celebrated film-maker died shortly after completing them. She wasn't quite expecting that but nor, as she reveals in these pages, did she expect to become a writer. It wasn't the sort of thing that happened to girls born in Glossop Terrace in Splott, the 'unmentionable and indisputable armpit of Cardiff'.In this delightful evocation of her own life, Rubens escorts us, with a flotilla of anecdotes, away from that armpit through her wartime childhood, her first 'major folly' (studying English at University) to stints as a teacher, lady's maid and actress before stumbling upon a career that bemused her until the end of her days. 'What shall I do,' was her constant internal refrain, 'when I grow up?'Bernice Rubens died in the autumn of 2004.

Who's Buried Where [new edn]

By Douglas Greenwood
Authors:
Douglas Greenwood
The definitive guide to who's buried where in EnglandA new, extensively revised and updated edition of this wideranging guide to the English burial places of over 350 prominent historical and royal figures, including Diana, Princess of Wales, with a brief biography of each, ninety illustrations and a useful index by county of all the graves mentioned.'Boadicea (died c.60-61AD) - Under platform 10, King's Cross Station, London' is just one of the fascinating entries in this unique book, which also explains briefly the reasons why and how her remains lie there. There is no doubt that the final resting places of illustrious men and women, in this case those who have played a prominent part in England's history, exercise a mysterious attraction to the traveller.. Fully updated and expanded new 4th edition, including the resting places of recently deceased celebrities. Remains the single most complete guide to burial sites in England. Has been continuously in print since 1982, with over 10 reprints. In regular demand by those interested in the lives of famous people

Writing About Your Life

By William Zinsser
Authors:
William Zinsser
Written with elegance, warmth, and humour, this highly original "teaching memoir" by William Zinsser,renowned bestselling author of On Writing Well gives you the tools to organize and recover your past, and the confidence to believe in your life narrative. His method is to take you on a memoir of his own: 13 chapters in which he recalls dramatic, amusing, and often surprising moments in his long and varied life as a writer, editor, teacher, and traveller. Along the way, Zinsser pauses to explain the technical decisions he made as he wrote about his life. They are the same decisions you'll have to make as you write about your own life: matters of selection, condensation, focus, attitude, voice, and tone.

We Won't Budge

By Manthia Diawara
Authors:
Manthia Diawara
Thirty years after leaving his native Mali, Manthia Diawara has a home in New York City, and more than a few acclaimed publications to his name. Still, he cannot shake the memories of his birth country-or of his first place of self-imposed exile: the heady streets of 1960s Paris. In this bittersweet memoir, Diawara recounts a year spent looking at how the assimilation process shapes the lives and dreams of immigrants everywhere. From the nightclubs of Bamako, to the cafes of Boulevard Montparnasse, to the black neighbourhoods of 1970s Washington, D.C., this important and original book shatters many cherished notions about experiencing race in the world today. At turns humorous and harrowing, beautifully written and shrewdly argued, it offers an unsentimental view of African traditions at the same time that it confronts America's most deeply ingrained prejudices.

Works On Paper

By Michael Holroyd
Authors:
Michael Holroyd
Michael Holroyd opens with a startling attack on biography, which is answered by two essays on the ethics and values of non-fiction writing. The book then examines the work of several contemporary biographers, the place of biography in fiction and of fiction in biography, and the revelations of some extravagant autobiographers, from Osbert Sitwell to Quentin Crisp - to which he adds some adventures of his own, in particular an important and unpublished piece THE MAKING OF GBS, a riveting story of deadly literary warfare. The book ends with a series of satires, celebrations, apologias and polemics which throw light not only on Michael Holroyd's progress as a biographer, but also his record as an embattled campaigner in the field of present-day literary politics.

Washington

By Meg Greenfield
Authors:
Meg Greenfield
With Washington , the illustrious longtime editorial page editor of The Washington Post wrote an instant classic, a sociology of Washington, D.C., that is as wise as it is wry. Greenfield, a recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for commentary, wrote the book secretly in the final two years of her life. She told her literary executor, presidential historian Michael Beschloss, of her work and he has written an afterword telling the story of how the book came into being. Greenfield's close friend and employer, the late Katharine Graham, contributed a moving and personal foreword. Greenfield came to Washington in 1961, at the beginning of the Kennedy administration and joined The Washington Post in 1968. Her editorials at the Post and her columns in Newsweek , were universally admired in Washington for their insight and style. In this, her first book, Greenfield provides a portrait of the U.S. capital at the end of the American century. It is an eccentric, tribal, provincial place where the primary currency is power. For all the scandal and politics of Washington, its real culture is surprisingly little known. Meg Greenfield explains the place with an insider's knowledge and an observer's cool perspective.

Word On The Street

By John McWhorter
Authors:
John McWhorter
Though there is a contingent of linguists who fight the fact, our language is always changing- not only through slang, but sound, syntax, and words' meanings as well. Debunking the myth of "pure" standard English, tackling controversial positions, and eschewing politically correct arguments, linguist John McWhorter considers speech patterns and regional accents to demonstrate just how the changes do occur. Wielding reason and humour, McWhorter ultimately explains why we must embrace these changes, ultimately revealing our American English in all its variety, expressiveness, and power.

A Woman Unknown

By Lucia Graves
Authors:
Lucia Graves
Lucia Graves, daughter of the poet Robert Graves and his wife Beryl, grew up in the beautiful village of Deia on the island of Majorca. Neither Spanish nor Catholic by birth, she nevertheless absorbed the different traditions of Spain and felt the full impact of Franco's dictatorship through the experience of her education. Lucia found herself continually bridging the gaps between Catalan, Spanish and English, as she picked up the patterns and nuances that contain the essence of each culture.Portraying her life as a child watching the hills lit up by bonfires on Good Friday, or, years later, walking through the haunting backstreets of the Jewish quarter of Girona, this is a captivating personal memoir which provides a first-hand account of Catalonia, where Lucia lived and raised a family. It is also a unique and perceptive appraisal of a country burdened by tradition yet coming to terms with political change as the decades moved on.
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