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Soul Survivor

By Jimmy McDonough
Authors:
Jimmy McDonough
With songs like "Love and Happiness," "I'm Still in Love with You," and "Tired of Being Alone," Al Green is considered by many to be the greatest soul singer of all time. He has sold more than 20 million records, been sampled by countless hip-hop artists, and even had President Obama singing his tunes. One of the most intricate and elusive figures in popular music, Green has never been scrutinized in print successfully-until now.Soul Survivor is the biography of a man whose life is the embodiment of the collision between the sacred and the profane, traversing the tortured road Green roamed from gospel to secular and back again. Readers bear witness to some of the greatest music ever recorded and the never-before-told story of Green's label, Hi Records.

Sober Stick Figure

By Amber Tozer
Authors:
Amber Tozer
Sober Stick Figure is a memoir from stand-up comedian Amber Tozer, chronicling her life as an alcoholic and her eventual recovery, starting with her first drink at the age of seven,all told with the help of childlike stick figures. Amber writes and illustrates the crazy and harsh truths of being raised by alcoholics, becoming one herself, stagnating in denial for years, and finally getting sober. As a teenager, Amber is an overachieving student athlete who copes with her family's alcoholic tragedies by focusing on her achievements. It quickly takes a funny and dark turn when she starts to experiment with booze and ignores the warning signs of alcoholism. Through blackouts, cringe-worthy embarrassments, and pounding hangovers, she convinces herself that she just likes to party." She leaves her hometown of Pueblo, Colorado to follow her dreams, and ends up in New York City, spending lots of time binge drinking, passing out on trains, and telling jokes on stage. She then moves to Los Angeles, thinking sunshine and show business will save her. Eventually hitting rock bottom, she has a moment of clarity, and knows she has to stop drinking. It's now been seven years since that last drink, and she's ready to tell her story. Sober Stick Figure is adventurous, hilarious, sad, sweet, tragic,and ultimately inspiring.

Suck and Blow

By Dean Budnick, John Popper
Authors:
Dean Budnick, John Popper
Hailed by many as the world's greatest harmonica player, John Popper has redefined the instrument. As the lead singer and principal songwriter of Blues traveller, Popper has performed for more than 30 million people over 2,000 live dates and composed such radio staples as "Hook," "But Anyway," and "Run-Around," the longest-charting single in Billboard history. He has appeared with Eric Clapton and B. B. King at the White House, welcomed the Hungarian ambassador to the stage, and inducted Carlos Santana into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.In Suck and Blow , Popper shares a candid, spirited account of his life and career. A straight-F student at Princeton High School, Popper's life changed with one serendipitous harmonica solo that captured the attention of his mercurial band teacher (the same teacher whose life was later fictionalized in the Academy award-winning film Whiplash ). After befriending three fellow musicians with whom he would form Blues traveller, Popper's academic career nearly ended in twelfth grade, until a meeting with the Dean of the New School for Social Research in which Popper pulled out his trusty harp and played his way into college.Popper and Blues traveller soon became enmeshed in the lower Manhattan music scene of the late 1980s, eventually becoming the house band at the fabled Wetlands Preserve and embarking on a journey that would one day land the group at Madison Square Garden on New Year's Eve. Along the way, Popper and his cohorts commanded the attention of fans and bands alike, through inspired performances and riotous debauchery.Popper's unique perspective on the music business began under the tutelage of Blues traveller's mentor and manager Bill Graham. After the rock impresario's untimely passing, Popper applied many of Graham's lessons to the formation of the H.O.R.D.E. tour, which John co-owned and hosted over eight years, welcoming such artists as Neil Young, the Allman Brothers Band, Phish, Dave Matthews Band, Ziggy Marley, and his longtime friends the Spin Doctors.Popper also shares a forthright assessment of his longstanding battle with obesity. Plagued by weight problems since childhood, a motorcycle accident a few years into his career confined him to a wheelchair for two years while his weight ballooned to 436 pounds. Angioplasty, gastric bypass surgery, and a tattoo on his chest that reads "I Want to Be Brave" when viewed in the mirror are products of Popper's struggle, compounded by codependency issues and the untimely death of founding Blues traveller bassist Bobby Sheehan.Popper's personal identity is entwined with his political passions. A staunch supporter of gun rights, he has performed at the National Republican Convention, yet he also maintains liberal positions on social issues. He will reconcile these views and share his encounters with the Bush family, the Clintons, the Gores, and other politicos.The iconoclastic, self-described Johnny Appleharp also dishes on cutting contests, Twitter trolls, party fouls, and prostitutes.In Suck and Blow , John Popper does it all with his signature honesty, humility, and humour.

The Strategist

By Bartholomew Sparrow
Authors:
Bartholomew Sparrow
For more than thirty years, Brent Scowcroft has played a central role in American foreign policy. Scowcroft helped manage the American departure from Vietnam, helped plan the historic breakthrough to China, urged the first President Bush to repel the invasion of Kuwait, and worked to shape the West's skillful response to the collapse of the Soviet empire. And when US foreign policy has gone awry, Scowcroft has quietly stepped in to repair the damage. His was one of the few respected voices in Washington to publicly warn the second President Bush against rushing to war in Iraq. The Strategist offers the first comprehensive examination of Brent Scowcroft's career. Author Bartholomew Sparrow details Scowcroft's fraught relationships with such powerful figures as Henry Kissinger (the controversial mentor Scowcroft ultimately outgrew), Alexander Haig (his one-time rival for Oval Office influence), and Condoleezza Rice (whose career Scowcroft helped launch,and with whom he publicly broke over Iraq).Through compelling narrative, in-depth research, and shrewd analysis, The Strategist brings colour and focus to the complex and often secretive nature of US foreign policy,an intellectual battlefield on which personalities, ideas, and worldviews clash, dramatically shaping the world in which we live.

The Stranger

By Chuck Todd
Authors:
Chuck Todd
Barack Obama won the presidency in 2008 partly because he was a Washington outsider. But when he got to 1600, that distinction turned out to be double-bladed. As president, Obama hoped to mount a second campaign, one for the heart of the Democratic Party and, he hoped, America, a new idology of progressive liberalism in sharp contrast to George W. Bush's aggressive conservativism and Bill Clinton's centrism. But while he'd been a brilliant campaign politician, working inside the system turned out to be much more of a challenge than Obama had ever imagined. Now, Chuck Todd takes us deep inside the White House for a gripping behind-the-scenes account of Obama's tumultous first term and campaign to win another. Drawing upon his unprecendented inner circle sources, Todd puts takes us behind closed White House and Camp David doors, on to Air Force One, through the hallways of Congress, and on the campaign trail. And not only does he give us the most intense, exciting and revealing portrait possible of this fascinating president and his struggles, Todd also seeks to define what "Obamism" really is, what the president stands for and how his decisions have changed--and will change--American politics for generations.
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Shadow Warrior

By Randall B. Woods
Authors:
Randall B. Woods
World War II commando, Cold War spy, and CIA director under presidents Nixon and Ford, William Egan Colby played a critical role in some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. A quintessential member of the greatest generation, Colby embodied the moral and strategic ambiguities of the postwar world, and first confronted many of the dilemmas about power and secrecy that America still grapples with today.In Shadow Warrior , eminent historian Randall B. Woods presents a riveting biography of Colby, revealing that this crusader for global democracy was also drawn to the darker side of American power. Aiming to help reverse the spread of totalitarianism in Europe and Asia, Colby joined the U.S. Army in 1941, just as America entered World War II. He served with distinction in France and Norway, and at the end of the war transitioned into America's first peacetime intelligence agency: the CIA. Fresh from the fight against fascism, Colby zealously redirected his efforts against international communism. He insisted on the importance of fighting communism on the ground, doggedly applying guerilla tactics for counterinsurgency, sabotage, surveillance, and information-gathering on the new battlefields of the Cold War. Over time, these strategies became increasingly ruthless as head of the CIA's Far East Division, Colby oversaw an endless succession of assassination attempts, coups, secret wars in Laos and Cambodia, and the Phoenix Program, in which 20,000 civilian supporters of the Vietcong were killed. Colby ultimately came clean about many of the CIA's illegal activities, making public a set of internal reports,known as the family jewels",that haunt the agency to this day. Ostracized from the intelligence community, he died under suspicious circumstances,a murky ending to a life lived in the shadows.Drawing on multiple new sources, including interviews with members of Colby's family, Woods has crafted a gripping biography of one of the most fascinating and controversial figures of the twentieth century.

Standing Up

By Marion Grodin
Authors:
Marion Grodin
Marion Grodin, daughter of funnyman Charles Grodin, knows firsthand that laughter is truly the best medicine, having not only survived breast cancer and divorce, but also, various addictions-including an inappropriate relationship with Haagen Dazs. Her hilarious riffs include; the story of growing large breasts that appeared seemingly overnight (Unfortunately this happened during the summer that she spent on the set of King Kong with her father and Jeff Bridges on whom she developed a huge crush); Her post divorce life, its slight weight gain and how she relied on her wise support group, her cats 'BabyFighter' Edmond and 'fashionably sporty, forensic expert' Snuggles. In this cleverly written memoir Marion integrates her diverse and challenging life experiences and unstoppable ability to make everything funny in a way that is both entertaining and helpful. She hopes that her book will send a message to those who feel they are misfits and to those locked in addiction: there is a way out - and life can be very good when you kick the habit.

Sundays at Eight

By Brian Lamb, C-SPAN
Authors:
Brian Lamb, C-SPAN
For the last 25 years, Sunday nights at 8pm on C-SPAN has been appointment television for many Americans. During that time, host Brian Lamb has invited people to his Capitol Hill studio for hour-long conversations about contemporary society and history. In today's soundbite culture that hour remains one of television's last vestiges of in-depth, civil conversation.First came C-SPAN's Booknotes in 1989, which by the time it ended in December 2004, was the longest-running author-interview program in American broadcast history. Many of the most notable nonfiction authors of its era were featured over the course of 800 episodes, and the conversations became a defining hour for the network and for nonfiction writers.In January 2005, C-SPAN embarked on a new chapter with the launch of Q and A. Again one hour of uninterrupted conversation but the focus was expanded to include documentary film makers, entrepreneurs, social workers, political leaders and just about anyone with a story to tell.To mark this anniversary Lamb and his team at C-SPAN have assembled Sundays at Eight , a collection of the best unpublished interviews and stories from the last 25 years. Featured in this collection are historians like David McCullough, Ron Chernow and Robert Caro, reporters including April Witt, John Burns and Michael Weisskopf, and numerous others, including Christopher Hitchens, Brit Hume and Kenneth Feinberg.In a March 2001 Booknotes interview 60 Minutes creator Don Hewitt described the show's success this way: All you have to do is tell me a story." This collection attests to the success of that principle, which has guided Lamb for decades. And his guests have not disappointed, from the dramatic escape of a lifelong resident of a North Korean prison camp, to the heavy price paid by one successful West Virginia businessman when he won 314 million in the lottery, or the heroic stories of recovery from the most horrific injuries in modern-day warfare. Told in the series'signature conversational manner, these stories come to life again on the page. Sundays at Eight is not merely a token for fans of C-SPAN's interview programs, but a collection of significant stories that have helped us understand the world for a quarter-century.

So Much to Do

By Richard Ravitch
Authors:
Richard Ravitch
Every city and every state needs a Richard Ravitch. In sixty years on the job, whether working in business or government, he was the man willing to tackle some of the most complex challenges facing New York. Trained as a lawyer, he worked briefly for the House of Representatives, then began his career in his family's construction business. He built high-profile projects like the Whitney Museum and Citicorp centre but his primary energy was devoted to building over 40,000 units of affordable housing including the first racially integrated apartment complex in Washington, D.C. He dealt with architects, engineers, lawyers, bureaucrats, politicians, union leaders, construction workers, bankers, and tenants,virtually all of the people who make cities and states work.It was no surprise that those endeavors ultimately led to a life of public service. In 1975, Ravitch was asked by then New York Governor Hugh Carey to arrange a rescue of the New York State Urban Development Corporation, a public entity that had issued bonds to finance over 30,000 affordable housing units but was on the verge of bankruptcy. That same year, Ravitch was at Carey's side when New York City's biggest banks said they would no longer underwrite its debt and he became instrumental to averting the city's bankruptcy.Throughout his career, Ravitch divided his time between public service and private enterprise. He was chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority from 1979 to 1983 and is generally credited with rebuilding the system. He turned around the Bowery Savings Bank, chaired a commission that rewrote the Charter of the City of New York, served on two Presidential Commissions, and became chief labour negotiator for Major League Baseball.Then, in 2008, after Governor Eliot Spitzer resigned in a prostitution scandal and New York State was in a post-financial-crisis meltdown, Spitzer's successor, David Paterson, appointed Ravitch Lieutenant Governor and asked him to make recommendations regarding the state's budgeting plan. What Ravitch found was the result of not just the economic downturn but years of fiscal denial. And the closer he looked, the clearer it became that the same thing was happening in most states. Budgetary pressures from Medicaid, pension promises to public employees, and deceptive budgeting and borrowing practices are crippling our states' ability to do what only they can do,invest in the physical and human infrastructure the country needs to thrive. Making this case is Ravitch's current public endeavor and it deserves immediate attention from both public officials and private citizens.

Stranger Here

By Jen Larsen
Authors:
Jen Larsen
Jen Larsen always thought that if she could only lose some weight, she would be unstoppable. She was convinced that once she found a way to not be fat any more, she would have the perfect existence she'd always dreamed of. When diet after diet failed, she decided to try bariatric surgery, and it worked better than she ever could have dreamed: she lost 180 pounds. As the weight fell away, though, Larsen realized that getting skinny was not the magical cure she thought it would be,and suddenly, she wasn't sure who she was anymore. Stranger Here is the brutally honest, surprisingly hilarious story of one woman's journey from one extreme of the weight spectrum to the other, and of the unexpected emotional chaos it created. Insightful and unsparing in her self-examination, Larsen depicts the exhilarating highs and devastating lows she experienced as a result of her weight loss,the incredible joy of finally beginning to look like the image of herself she's always carried inside her head, and the crushing pain and confusion of feeling like a stranger in her own body after losing the weight that has always defined her.

A Suppressed Cry

By Victoria Glendinning
Authors:
Victoria Glendinning
'I always wanted everything so frantically, and I'm just the person that can't have them.' Based on family papers and memories, this picture of middle class life at the end of the nineteenth century tells the poignant story of Winnie Seebohm, Victoria Glendinning's great-aunt, who in 1885 was one of the early students at Newnham College, Cambridge. Though much loved by her family, Winnie was stifled in her desire for life and died at the age of twenty-two.
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The Secret Sex Life of a Single Mom

By Delaine Moore
Authors:
Delaine Moore
For seven years, Delaine Moore devoted herself to being the perfect wife and stay-at-home mom. Then, one day, she discovers her husband's infidelities, and suddenly she finds herself in a new role: 37 years old, mother of three . . . and going through a divorce. In the midst of this emotional turmoil, Moore discovers that her long-dormant libido has suddenly come alive,and, surprising even herself, she decides to listen to what it's saying. The Secret Sex Life of a Single Mom is the funny and empowering story of the physical and spiritual self-discovery that results from Moore's sexual awakening. Connecting with a fiery, daring side of her personality that has been subsumed by motherhood and marriage, Moore tries out everything from sex clubs and young gigolos to bondage and multi-partner sex,testing her limits, reclaiming her body, and taking control of her life along the way. More than the story of a woman's breaking and remaking after divorce, The Secret Sex Life of a Single Mom is a humorous, thoughtful exploration of what it means to be a mother and a sexual being, and a reminder that when life slams you down, a little fire won't burn you,it will awaken you.

Songs of Blood and Sword

By Fatima Bhutto
Authors:
Fatima Bhutto
In September 1996, fourteen-year-old Fatima Bhutto shielded her baby brother while shots rang out outside the family home in Karachi. This was the evening that her father, Murtaza, was assassinated. It was the latest in a long line of tragedies for one of the world's best-known political dynasties. Songs of Blood and Sword tells the story of a family of feudal landlords who became power brokers in the newly created state of Pakistan. It is an epic tale of intrigue and the international political elite, the making of modern Pakistan, and, ultimately, tragedy. It is also a book about a daughter's love for her father and her search to uncover the truth of his life and death.

Stuntman!

By Hal Needham
Authors:
Hal Needham
The incomparable, indestructible Hal Needham broke 56 bones and his back - twice - as a stuntman in movies and TV shows like Mission Impossible and The French Connection. He hung upside down from an airplane in Spirit of St. Louis, jumped between galloping horses in Little Big Man and he taught John Wayne how to really throw a punch.When his stunt career working with the likes of Kirk Douglas and Steve McQueen was over, Needham's adventures continued. He directed the classics Smokey and the Bandit and Cannonball Run, starring his roommate Burt Reynolds. He owned the Skoal Bandit NASCAR team and the Budweiser Rocket Car, which broke the sound barrier. Needham shares all the outrageous stories that could only come from a man who earned a living risking his life.

Sarah from Alaska

By Scott Conroy, Shushannah Walshe
Authors:
Scott Conroy, Shushannah Walshe
Sarah Palin is still the most dynamic yet polarizing Republican in America. In Sarah from Alaska Scott Conroy and Shushannah Walshe draw on their experiences as embedded reporters on Palin's campaign, exclusive on-scene coverage of Palin's post-election struggles in Alaska, and revealing interviews with former McCain/Palin staffers, top political minds, and Palin's family, friends, and foes in Alaska to tell the remarkable behind-the-scenes story of her improbable rise,and its complicated aftermath. The result is a fair and fascinating portrait of Sarah Palin and of the American political process.

Spent

By Avis Cardella
Authors:
Avis Cardella
Growing up, Avis Cardella devoured her mother's fashion magazines; the images seemed to promise a glamorous existence. In real life, her relationship with clothing and shopping grows into an obsession. Cardella shops to define herself and, paradoxically, to lose herself and before long, it becomes a dangerous addiction. She forgoes food for Prada. Credit card debt blooms like the ever-increasing pile of unworn shoes and clothing in the back of her closet. Life presents some hard lessons about money, men and the price of trying to keep up appearances. SPENT is Avis Cardella's timely, deeply personal and shockingly dramatic exploration of our cultural need to spend, and of what happens when someone is consumed by the desire to consume.

The Secret Lives Of The Dalai Lama

By Alexander Norman
Authors:
Alexander Norman
His Holiness the Dalai Lama is renowned the world over for his unswerving dedication to non-violence in his efforts to achieve justice for Tibet, yet the Chinese call him 'a wolf in monk's robes'. He is fourteenth in a lineage whose history is every bit as bloody and intrigue-laden as that of the Papacy. The sixth Dalai Lama was a notorious womaniser, four successive ones were almost certainly murdered and the present Dalai Lama has himself been the target of attacks that resulted in the brutal murder of a close colleagueTHE LIVES OF THE DALAI LAMA gives a fast-paced and absorbing insight into the real story of Tibetan culture, politics and spirituality, and shows the Dalai Lama as a man of courage, compassion and honesty.
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Selected Letters Of Edith Sitwell

By Richard Greene, Edith Sitwell
Authors:
Richard Greene, Edith Sitwell
Edith Sitwell (1887-1964) was, through four decades, the most prominent and celebrated woman poet in Britain. Among the notable admirers of her work were Siegfried Sassoon, WB Yeats and Gertrude Stein, Stephen Spender and Marianne Moore. Just after her death, Allen Tate described her in The New York Times as 'one of the great poets of the twentieth century'. Even as one allows for the ebb and flow of literary reputations, Edith Sitwell will have permanent claim on the attention of readers and literary scholars. She and her two brothers, Osbert and Sacheverell, were the focus of a movement in English Literature described as an 'alternative Bloomsbury'. This volume includes unpublished letters to many significant figures, including WB Yeats, Bertrand Russell and Benjamin Britten. It also contains letters that illuminate Sitwell's relations with other women writers, among them, Gertrude Stein and Rosamond Lehmann.'I am besotted with this dotty old bat. Britain's most celebrated and eccentric female poet, she dashed off reams of witty, newsy, mischievous letters in exquisitely beautiful prose. Every letter is a gem' - Val Hennessy (one of her top ten books for 1997), Daily Mail

The Sound Of No Hands Clapping

By Toby Young
Authors:
Toby Young
When even his friends refer to him as 'a balding, bug-eyed opportunist with the looks of a beach ball, the charisma of a glove-puppet and an ego the size of a Hercules supply plane,' the odds of Toby Young scoring - in any sense - appear to be slim. But then HOW TO LOSE FRIENDS, his memoir about failing to take Manhattan, becomes an international bestseller. Now Tinseltown beckons. After receiving a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity from a Hollywood producer, Toby sets his sights anew on a high-flying career, this time on the West Coast. But it doesn't take long for Toby's self-sabotaging instincts to reassert themselves. On the home front, though, things are looking up: Toby persuades his girlfriend to marry him and move to Los Angeles - but then she decides to abandon her promising legal career in order to become a full-time housewife . . . and mother.Toby's hapless attempts to pursue a glamorous showbiz career while buried in nappies will strike a chord with all modern fathers struggling to find the right work/life balance . . . and with their exasperated wives. Failure - and fatherhood - have never been funnier.
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Surviving With Wolves

By Misha Defonseca
Authors:
Misha Defonseca
One of the most extraordinary and poignant survival stories to come out of World War II. Misha was only six years old when her Jewish parents were taken away from their home in Belgium by the Nazis. She was given a new name, a new home, and forced into a new religion. No one told her why her parents were no longer with her, only that they had gone East. So one day, equipped only with a tiny compass and a few provisions, she set out East to find them. Alone, Misha crossed Belgium, Germany and Poland on foot - hiding in woods, stealing scraps of food - until, close to starvation, she was adopted by a family of wolves. She ate and played with the wolf cubs, and was protected by their mother. Thanks to the wolves, she survived the war, and eventually found her way home via the Ukraine, Romania and Italy.