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Elemental

By Tim James
Authors:
Tim James
The Universe came into being 13.8 billion years ago. At this point, all of existence could be summed up as an endless soup of particles frothing at temperatures many times hotter than the Sun. It was chaos. Fortunately, as the Universe expanded, everything began to cool and the particles stabilised. It was around this time, as disorder gave way to order, that the elements were born. Fast forward to June 2016 and the periodic table of elements was finally completed with the discovery and addition of four new elements. At last we could identify all the ingredients necessary to make a world. But it doesn't stop there. Human ingenuity knows no bounds; we have even begun to invent our own elements and have created an entire science devoted to their study: chemistry. When it comes to chemistry, Tim James knows his stuff. In Elemental he tells the story of the periodic table from its ancient Greek roots, when you could count the number of elements humans were aware of on one hand, to the modern alchemists of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, who have used nuclear chemistry and physics to generate new elements and complete the periodic table. In addition to this, James answers questions such as: What is the chemical symbol for a human?What would happen if all of the elements were mixed together?How many bananas can you stand next to before you die of radiation sickness?Which liquid can teleport through walls?Why is the medieval dream of transmuting lead into gold now a reality?
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Einstein's Greatest Mistake

By David Bodanis
Authors:
David Bodanis
Widely considered the greatest genius of all time, Albert Einstein revolutionised our understanding of the cosmos with his general theory of relativity and helped to lead us into the atomic age. Yet in the final decades of his life he was also ignored by most working scientists, his ideas opposed by even his closest friends. This stunning downfall can be traced to Einstein's earliest successes and to personal qualities that were at first his best assets. Einstein's imagination and self-confidence served him well as he sought to reveal the universe's structure, but when it came to newer revelations in the field of quantum mechanics, these same traits undermined his quest for the ultimate truth. David Bodanis traces the arc of Einstein's intellectual development across his professional and personal life, showing how Einstein's confidence in his own powers of intuition proved to be both his greatest strength and his ultimate undoing. He was a fallible genius. An intimate and enlightening biography of the celebrated physicist, Einstein's Greatest Mistake reveals how much we owe Einstein today - and how much more he might have achieved if not for his all-too-human flaws.
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End Of Science

By John Horgan
Authors:
John Horgan

Eureka

By Chad Orzel
Authors:
Chad Orzel
Even in the twenty-first century the popular image of a scientist is a reclusive genius in a lab coat, mixing formulas or working out equations inaccessible to all but the initiated few. The idea that scientists are somehow smarter than the rest of us is a common, yet dangerous, misconception, getting us off the hook for not knowing,or caring,how the world works. How did science become so divorced from our everyday experience? Is scientific understanding so far out of reach for the non-scientists among us?As science popularizer Chad Orzel argues in Eureka , even the people who are most forthright about hating science are doing science, often without even knowing it. Orzel shows that science isn't something alien and inscrutable beyond the capabilities of ordinary people, it's central to the human experience. Every human can think like a scientist, and regularly does so in the course of everyday activities. The disconnect between this reality and most people's perception is mostly due to the common misconception that science is a body of (boring, abstract, often mathematical) facts. In truth, science is best thought of as a process: Looking at the world, Thinking about what makes it work, Testing your mental model by comparing it to reality, and Telling others about your results. The facts that we too often think of as the whole of science are merely the product of this scientific process. Eureka shows that this process is one we all regularly use, and something that everybody can do.By revealing the connection between the everyday activities that people do,solving crossword puzzles, playing sports, or even watching mystery shows on television,and the processes used to make great scientific discoveries, Orzel shows that if we recognize the process of doing science as something familiar, we will be better able to appreciate scientific discoveries, and use scientific facts and thinking to help address the problems that affect us all.
  • Evernight

    By Kristen Callihan
    Authors:
    Kristen Callihan
    Holly Evernight belongs to a very special family of inventors. They have nobly served the Society for the Suppression of Supernaturals for generations. And Holly may have the most special creative powers of them all. But her skills are about to be tested as she tries to save the life of a half-man-half-machine whose clockwork heart is ticking down to the bitter end...William Thorne was a rebel, a hired assassin for the SOS's greatest rival, before he was taken, tortured and transformed. Now his mind and soul battle with his body as he becomes less and less human. But the true fight for his humanity will be waged within his heart.
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    The Edge of the Sky

    By Roberto Trotta
    Authors:
    Roberto Trotta
    From the big bang to black holes, from dark matter to dark energy, from the origins of the universe to its ultimate destiny, The Edge of the Sky tells the story of the most important discoveries and mysteries in modern cosmology,with a twist. The book's lexicon is limited to the thousand most common words in the English language, excluding physics , energy , galaxy , or even universe . Through the eyes of a fictional scientist (Student-People) hunting for dark matter with one of the biggest telescopes (Big-Seers) on Earth (Home-World), cosmologist Roberto Trotta explores the most important ideas about our universe (All-there-is) in language simple enough for anyone to understand.A unique blend of literary experimentation and science popularization, this delightful book is a perfect gift for any aspiring astronomer. The Edge of the Sky tells the story of the universe on a human scale, and the result is out of this world.

    The English Girl

    By Margaret Leroy
    Authors:
    Margaret Leroy
    When seventeen-year-old Stella Whittaker is offered the chance to study at the Academy of Music in Vienna it's a dream-come-true, made possible by old family friends, Rainer and Marthe Kraus, who offer her a place to live.Seduced by the elegant beauty of the city, Stella explores the magnificent palaces, gardens and fashionable coffee houses, and after a chance meeting in an art gallery, falls in love with Harri Reznik, a young Jewish doctor.But as the threat of war casts a dark shadow over Europe, Stella soon discovers that both the household where she lives, and the city she has come to call home, are not as welcoming as they once seemed. And at the dawn of this terrifying new world, no one is safe.
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    Exercises for the Feynman Lectures on Physics

    By Matthew Sands, Richard P. Feynman, Robert B. Leighton
    Authors:
    Matthew Sands, Richard P. Feynman, Robert B. Leighton
    Combined into one volume for the first time, the updated and clarified Exercises for the Feynman Lectures on Physics provides comprehensive, hands-on practice in all the most important areas of physics,from Newtonian mechanics through the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics.A perfect complement to The Feynman Lectures on Physics , these exercises have all been assigned in Caltech's mandatory two-year introductory physics course, either when Richard Feynman was teaching it, or during the nearly two decades that followed when The Feynman Lectures on Physics was used as the textbook. With this modern, easy-to-use volume, students of physics will have a chance to apply what they have learned in the Lectures and to enhance and reinforce the concepts taught by the inimitable Richard Feynman.

    The Essential Galileo

    By John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin
    Authors:
    John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin
    Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was the first scientist in the modern use of the term. Instead of relying on the works of Aristotle, he actually carried out experiments to test theories - legend has it that one of his experiments involved throwing weights off the Leaning Tower of Pisa. His astronomical observations with the telescope shattered the idea that the Earth was at the centre of the Universe, and led to his trial for heresy. He had a great lust for life, three children by a woman he never married, a biting, sarcastic with and the friendship of princes and (in spite of his run in with Pope Urban VIII) cardinals. An introduction, afterword and clear chronological table place Galileo's work in the context of the development of scientific knowledge.

    The Essential Einstein

    By John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin
    Authors:
    John Gribbin, Mary Gribbin
    The definitive scientific icon of the twentieth century, Albert Einstein is remember for one equation, E=mc², and the image of a white-haired, pipe-smoking professor who didn't wear socks. But the equation comes from a time when all of his great work was done. The real Albert Einstein ­- the high school drop-out who won the Nobel Prize along with the hearts of so many young women - was young, handsome, dark haired and a natty dresser. And his greatest piece of work was so poorly understood at the time that the Nobel Committee, who couldn't understand it, but in a panic felt they ought to give him a prize for something, honoured him for something else. An introduction, afterword and clear chronological table place Einstein's work in the context of the development of scientific knowledge.

    Eden Falls

    By Jane Sanderson
    Authors:
    Jane Sanderson
    An extraordinary cast of characters play out their dramas amongst the chaos of the emerging modern world . . .Jamaica 1909. Millionaire Silas Whittam is struggling to bring his dream of a luxury hotel to life. He's relieved when his sister, Eve, arrives - basking in the success of her Yorkshire pies and puddings business. But as Eve befriends the staff, secrets hidden by Silas begin to emerge.In England, the Earl and Countess of Netherwood try to hide their empty marriage, as they enjoy the whirlwind of the London season. Yet the Earl's suffragette sister, Lady Henrietta, could disgrace them all.And for new Labour MP Amos Sykes, times are tough. Especially with his wife decorating the homes of the very aristocrats he would like to see ruined.
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    EcoMind

    By Frances Moore Lappe
    Authors:
    Frances Moore Lappe
    In EcoMind , Frances Moore Lappé,a giant of the environmental movement,confronts accepted wisdom of environmentalism. Drawing on the latest research from anthropology to neuroscience and her own field experience, she argues that the biggest challenge to human survival isn't our fossil fuel dependency, melting glaciers, or other calamities. Rather, it's our faulty way of thinking about these environmental crises that robs us of power. Lappé dismantles seven common thought traps",from limits to growth to the failings of democracy, that belie what we now know about nature, including our own, and offers contrasting thought leaps" that reveal our hidden power. Like her Diet for a Small Planet classic, EcoMind is challenging, controversial and empowering.

    The Elements

    By Nick Mann, Theodore Gray
    Authors:
    Nick Mann, Theodore Gray
    The Elements?has become an international sensation, with over one million copies in-print worldwide.?The highly-anticipated paperback edition of?The Elements?is finally available.An eye-opening, original collection of gorgeous, never-before-seen photographic representations of the 118 elements in the periodic table.?The elements are what we, and everything around us, are made of. But how many elements has anyone actually seen in pure, uncombined form??The Elements?provides this rare opportunity. Based on seven years of research and photography, the pictures in this book make up the most complete, and visually arresting, representation available to the naked eye of every atom in the universe. Organized in order of appearance on the periodic table, each element is represented by a spread that includes a stunning, full-page, full-color photograph that most closely represents it in its purest form. For example, at -183?C, oxygen turns from a colorless gas to a beautiful pale blue liquid.?Also included are fascinating facts, figures, and stories of the elements as well as data on the properties of each, including atomic weight, density, melting and boiling point, valence, electronegativity, and the year and location in which it was discovered. Several additional photographs show each element in slightly altered forms or as used in various practical ways. The element's position on the periodic table is pinpointed on a mini rendering of the table and an illustrated scale of the element's boiling and/or melting points appears on each page along with a density scale that runs along the bottom.?Packed with interesting information, this combination of solid science and stunning artistic photographs is the perfect gift book for every sentient creature in the universe.Includes a tear-out poster of Theodore Gray's iconic Photographic Periodic Table!
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    Edith Head

    By Jay Jorgensen
    Authors:
    Jay Jorgensen
    All About Eve. Funny Face. Sunset Blvd. Rear Window. Sabrina. A Place in the Sun. The Ten Commandments. Scores of iconic films of the last century had one thing in common: costume designer Edith Head (1897-1981). She racked up an unprecedented 35 Oscar nods and 400 film credits over the course of a fifty-year career. Never before has the account of Hollywood's most influential designer been so thoroughly revealed,because never before have the Edith Head Archives of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences been tapped. This unprecedented access allows this book to be a one-of-a-kind survey, bringing together a spectacular collection of rare and never-before-seen sketches, costume test shots, behind-the- scenes photos, and ephemera.
  • The Edge Of Desire

    By Stephanie Laurens
    Authors:
    Stephanie Laurens
    Christian, I need your help. There is no one else I can turn to . . . L.'When Christian Allardyce, sixth Marquess of Dearne, reads these words, his world is turned upside down. Lady Letitia Randall is a woman like no other, and the day he left her behind to fight for King and Country was the most difficult of his life. He never forgot the feel of her lips against his, but never expected to see her again. Yet now she seeks his help, and Christian knows he cannot resist her plea.Letitia believes Christian abandoned her when she needed him most, and she hates to call on his aid. But to clear his brother's name, she has sworn to use every weapon at her command, even it means seducing her former lover. Yet all the while, Christian is waging a war of his won - a campaign of pure pleasure and sweet revenge that will take them both beyond the edge of desire.
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    Einstein, Picasso

    By Arthur J. Miller
    Authors:
    Arthur J. Miller
    The most important scientist of the twentieth century and the most important artist had their periods of greatest creativity almost simultaneously and in remarkably similar circumstances. This fascinating parallel biography of Albert Einstein and Pablo Picasso as young men examines their greatest creations-Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon and Einstein's special theory of relativity. Miller shows how these breakthroughs arose not only from within their respective fields but from larger currents in the intellectual culture of the times. Ultimately, Miller shows how Einstein and Picasso, in a deep and important sense, were both working on the same problem.

    The Epic History Of Biology

    By Anthony Serafini
    Authors:
    Anthony Serafini
    The search for our elusive human origins and an understanding of the mysteries of the human body have challenged the most inquisitive and imaginative thinkers from Egyptian times through the twentieth century. In The Epic History of Biology, Anthony Serafini - a distinguished philosopher and historian of science - regales the reader with the triumphs and failures of the geniuses of the life sciences. The subtleties of the animal kingdom - anatomy, zoology, and reproduction - along with the complexities of the plant kingdom, have fascinated humanity as far back as 5000 years ago. Astounding ancient knowledge of the arcane curing powers of herbs as well as early experimentation with different chemical combinations for such purposes as mummification led to today's biological technology. Innovative pioneers such as Aristotle, Galen, Hippocrates, and Vesalius challenged the limits of knowledge and single-mindedly pursued their work, often in the face of blind superstition. In superb, lyrical prose Serafini recreates the ideas and theories of these revolutionaries from ancient times through today, against the backdrop of the dogma and prejudices of their time. He explores the inspired revelations that gave birth to such discoveries as the controversial theory of evolution, the humble origins of genetics, the fantastic predictions of quantum mechanics, and the infinite promise of computer technology. Even today the biological sciences are undergoing rapid and kaleidoscopic changes. Every new insight gives rise to a myriad of new ethical questions and responsibilities. The Epic History of Biology confronts these issues head on and predicts the wondrous new directions biology will follow.

    The End Of Physics

    By David Lindley
    Authors:
    David Lindley
    For more than a century physicists have hoped that they were closing in on the Holy Grail of modern science: a unified theory that would make sense of the entire physical world, from the subnuclear realm of quarks and gluons to the very moment of creation of the universe. The End of Physics is a history of the attempts to find such a theory of everything" a forceful argument it will never be found and a warning that the compromises necessary to produce a final theory may well undermine the rules of good science.At the heart of Lindley's story is the rise of the particle physicists and their attempts to reach far out into the cosmos for a unifying theory. Working beyond the grasp of the largest telescopes or the most powerful particle accelerators, and unable to subject their findings and theories to experimental scrutiny, they have moved into a world governed entirely by mathematical and highly speculative theorizing, none of which can be empirically verified. Lindley argues that a theory of everything derived from particle physics will be full of untested,and untestable,assumptions. And if physicists yield to such speculation, the field will retreat from the high ground of science, becoming instead a modern mythology. This would mean the end of physics as we know it.
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