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The Capitalist Comeback

By Andrew F. Puzder
Authors:
Andrew F. Puzder
CAPITALISM UNDER ATTACK explains the single biggest threat to the free enterprise system: the demonization of the profit motive. It demonstrates the urgent need to educate all Americans - but especially the next generation - about profit's vital role in our nation. CAPITALISM UNDER ATTACK traces how the path of human economic history has led to an era where making money, owning property, and trying to maximize profits are seen by a large segment of the world population as selfish and even anti-societal aims. Ironically, data shows these anti-capitalist sentiments are most prevalent - and spreading at troubling rates - in the societies that have benefited most from capitalism over the last century. Places like the United States and Western Europe are today proving remarkably susceptible to neo-Marxist and redistributive socialist ideology - among academics in America's premiere institutions, among historians, and among politicians who continually rail against corporate profits or the evil "One Percent." ANDY PUZDER reminds readers that the pursuit of profit was a lynchpin to America's success as a nation - and led to the creation of a middle class of shopkeepers, merchants, and entrepreneurs who could finally earn a living, succeed and fail, based on their own abilities. Puzder briefly traces the history of profit from ancient times, to its golden age after liberal philosophers like John Locke and Adam Smith defended the idea of individual rights and private property. He explains how their ideas reached their purest form in practice when they were given new life as the basis for the creation of the new United States of America. The world, led by that grand experiment in profit - the U.S. - has decided to reject and shame the idea of making money, and the consequences this shift could have in the future.
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Crocs in the Cabinet

By Ben Smee, Chistopher A Walsh
Authors:
Ben Smee, Chistopher A Walsh
In the Northern Territory, politics isn't a numbers game, it's a blood sport.The recent goings-on in Top End politics make the Rudd, Gillard, Abbott and Turnbull skirmishes in Canberra look positively civil and Bronwyn Bishop's travel expenses like small change. Not since the night Malcolm Fraser lost his trousers has the Australian political scene provided such entertainment. Laying bare the backstabbing, scandals, power struggles and flawed characters that took the Country Liberal Party from the Northern Territory's dominant political force to near extinction in four short years, CROCS IN THE CABINET may read like a satire, but it is all true. You have to read it to believe it. Find out exactly how bonkers the NT parliament really was, as you read of ...- a drunk Territory minister, a seedy Tokyo 'cabaret' club, a $5000 bar tab and taxpayer-funded credit card. Priceless!- the lewd videos a masturbating minister sent someone, not his wife- the anguished words 'WE ARE IN LOVE!' echoing from the floor of parliament- a Chief Minister defying a coup by throwing his phone in a pool- the 'gone fishing' MP who chose baiting up instead of turning up- the minister, charged with assault, who sold her 'MY HUSBAND IS HAVING AN AFFAIR WITH MY NIECE' story to TAKE 5 magazine.Two of the NT NEWS's best journalists, Walkley Award-winning Ben Smee and award-winning Christopher A Walsh, show that the NT NEWS is not just crocodiles and quirky front pages - its hard-hitting investigativejournalists also deliver a memorable bite.This is FEAR AND LOATHING ON THE CAMPAIGN TRAIL meets FAWLTY TOWERS.
  • Curiosities from the College Museum

    By Richard Thompson
    Authors:
    Richard Thompson
    The Royal College of Physicians celebrates its 500th anniversary in 2018, and to observe this landmark is publishing this series of ten books. Each of the books focuses on fifty themed elements that have contributed to making the RCP what it is today, together adding up to 500 reflections on 500 years. Some of the people, ideas, objects and manuscripts featured are directly connected to the College, while others have had an influence that can still be felt in its work.This fifth book in the series is a celebration of 50 fascinating objects in the Royal College's museum and collections.
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  • The Changi Brownlow

    By Roland Perry
    Authors:
    Roland Perry
    'This book is a must'COURIER-MAILAfter Singapore falls to the Japanese early in 1942, 70,000 prisoners including 15,000 Australians, are held as POWs at the notorious Changi prison, Singapore. To amuse themselves and fellow inmates, a group of sportsmen led by the indefatigable and popular 'Chicken' Smallhorn, created an Australian Football League, complete with tribunal, selection panel, umpires and coaches. The final game of the one and only season attracted 10,000 spectators, and a unique Brownlow Medal was awarded. Meet the main characters behind this spectacle: Peter Chitty, the farm hand from Snowy River country with unfathomable physical and mental fortitude, and one of eight in his immediate family who volunteered to fight and serve in WW2; 'Chicken' Smallhorn, the Brownlow Medal-winning little man with the huge heart; and 'Weary' Dunlop, the courageous doctor, who cares for the POWs as they endure malnutrition, disease and often inhuman treatment. This is a story of courage and the invincibility of the human spirit, and the Australian love of sport. Now part of the HACHETTE MILITARY COLLECTION.

    The Chaos of Empire

    By Jon Wilson
    Authors:
    Jon Wilson
    The popular image of the British Raj- an era of efficient but officious governors, sycophantic local functionaries, doting amahs, blisteringly hot days and torrid nights- chronicled by Forster and Kipling is a glamorous, nostalgic, but entirely fictitious. In this dramatic revisionist history, Jon Wilson upends the carefully sanitized image of unity, order, and success to reveal an empire rooted far more in violence than in virtue, far more in chaos than in control.Through the lives of administrators, soldiers, and subjects- both British and Indian- The Chaos of Empire traces Britain's imperial rule from the East India Company's first transactions in the 1600s to Indian Independence in 1947. The Raj was the most public demonstration of a state's ability to project power far from home, and its perceived success was used to justify interventions around the world in the years that followed. But the Raj's institutions- from law courts to railway lines- were designed to protect British power without benefiting the people they ruled. This self-serving and careless governance resulted in an impoverished people and a stifled society, not a glorious Indian empire.Jon Wilson's new portrait of a much-mythologized era finally and convincingly proves that the story of benign British triumph was a carefully concocted fiction, here thoroughly and totally debunked.

    A Christmas Far from Home

    By Stanley Weintraub
    Authors:
    Stanley Weintraub
    In the tradition of his Silent Night and Pearl Harbor Christmas , historian Stanley Weintraub presents another gripping narrative of a wartime Christmas season- the epic story of the 1950 holiday season in Korea, when American troops faced extreme cold, a determined enemy, and long odds. A Military Book Club main selection

    The Crash of 2016: The Plot to Destroy America--and What We Can Do to Stop It

    By Thom Hartmann
    Authors:
    Thom Hartmann
    In THE CRASH OF 2016, Thom Hartmann describes a country not on the road to collapse, but in the midst of an economic implosion that could make the Great Depression seem like child's play. Our once-enlightened American political and economic systems have been manipulated to ensure the success of only a fraction of the population at the expense of the rest of us, a "for the rich, by the rich" system that is turning our Democracy into an ancient feudal kingdom and leading to policies that only benefit the highest bidder. A backlash is now palpable-against the banksters, oligarchs, and economic royalists like Milton Friedman, Lewis F. Powell, Alan Greenspan, Ronald Reagan, Jude Wannitsky, Roger Ailes, the Koch brothers, and others who have plunged our nation into economic chaos and social instability. But like the previous crashes of 1770, 1856, and 1929, the Crash of 2016 will give us the chance to once again embrace the moral motive over the profit motive, and to rebuild an economic model that has always yielded great success. Thoroughly researched and passionately argued, in THE CRASH OF 2016 Hartmann assures us that if the right reforms are enacted we can avert disaster and make our nation whole again.
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    Consider the Fork

    By Bee Wilson
    Authors:
    Bee Wilson
    Since prehistory, humans have braved sharp knives, fire, and grindstones to transform raw ingredients into something delicious,or at least edible. Tools shape what we eat, but they have also transformed how we consume, and how we think about, our food. Technology in the kitchen does not just mean the Pacojets and sous-vide of the modernist kitchen. It can also mean the humbler tools of everyday cooking and eating: a wooden spoon and a skillet, chopsticks and forks. In Consider the Fork , award-winning food writer Bee Wilson provides a wonderful and witty tour of the evolution of cooking around the world, revealing the hidden history of everyday objects we often take for granted. Knives,perhaps our most important gastronomic tool,predate the discovery of fire, whereas the fork endured centuries of ridicule before gaining widespread acceptance pots and pans have been around for millennia, while plates are a relatively recent invention. Many once-new technologies have become essential elements of any well-stocked kitchen,mortars and pestles, serrated knives, stainless steel pots, refrigerators. Others have proved only passing fancies, or were supplanted by better technologies one would be hard pressed now to find a water-powered egg whisk, a magnet-operated spit roaster, a cider owl, or a turnspit dog. Although many tools have disappeared from the modern kitchen, they have left us with traditions, tastes, and even physical characteristics that we would never have possessed otherwise.Blending history, science, and anthropology, Wilson reveals how our culinary tools and tricks came to be, and how their influence has shaped modern food culture. The story of how we have tamed fire and ice and wielded whisks, spoons, and graters, all for the sake of putting food in our mouths, Consider the Fork is truly a book to savour.

    The Company Town

    By Hardy Green
    Authors:
    Hardy Green
    Company town: the very phrase sounds un-American. Yet company towns are the essence of America. Hershey bars, Corning glassware, Kohler bathroom fixtures, Maytag washers, Spam,each is the signature product of a company town in which one business, for better or for worse, exercises a grip over the population. In The Company Town , Hardy Green, who has covered American business for over a decade, describes the emergence of these communities and their role in shaping the American economy since the country's earliest years. But rather than adhering to a uniform blueprint, American company towns have come to represent two very different strands of capitalism: one humanistic, the other exploitative. Through the framework of this dichotomy, Green provides a compelling analysis of the effect of the company town on the development of American capitalism, and tells the sweeping tale of how the American economy has grown and changed over the years.

    China

    By John Keay
    Authors:
    John Keay
    Many nations define themselves in terms of territory or people China defines itself in terms of history. Taking into account the country's unrivaled, voluminous tradition of history writing, John Keay has composed a vital and illuminating overview of the nation's complex and vivid past. Keay's authoritative history examines 5,000 years in China, from the time of the Three Dynasties through Chairman Mao and the current economic transformation of the country. Crisp, judicious, and engaging, China is the classic single-volume history for anyone seeking to understand the present and future of this immensely powerful nation.

    Change For A Farthing

    By Ken McCoy
    Authors:
    Ken McCoy
    Ten-year-old Amy Farthing miraculously survives the sinking of the Lusitania, but loses both her parents in the disaster. However, on her arrival in England, her rich paternal grandfather, Godfrey Farthing, disowns the little girl, for reasons he will not divulge. Although she is confused and hurt by his behaviour, Amy is thankfully welcomed by her maternal grandmother, Beth, and quickly exchanges her life of privilege in New York for the hard realities of a mill town in Yorkshire. Despite the differences, Amy starts to settle in, adjust to her new surroundings and make friends, especially with local lad, Billy Eccles.However, unbeknownst to Amy and Beth, Amy is the one true heir to the Farthing fortune, and Godfrey is prepared to take whatever measures necessary to ensure she never finds out . . .
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    Catch A Falling Star

    By Ken McCoy
    Authors:
    Ken McCoy
    The only life Dove McKenna has ever known has been one of the open road. Living with her parents and her brother in a show wagon, travelling from town to town, performing for folk happy enough to pay them for their entertainment, whilst dismissing them as 'gippos' and 'thieves' behind their backs. But it is not until after their mother's death that they settle in one place long enough for Dove to really feel her difference. The McKennas set up camp on a patch of barren land just outside Leeds and Dove and Henry finally get the chance to go to school. And though at St Joseph's they encounter prejudice from pupils, teachers and parents, they find friendships too. Dove begins to dream of acceptance and perhaps even a better home life. For, when sober, their father is an amiable enough soul, but when drunk he can be a monster. And Malachy McKenna is drunk more often than not . . .
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    C Street

    By Jeff Sharlet
    Authors:
    Jeff Sharlet
    In Jeff Sharlet's bestselling book, The Family, he wrote about the 'C Street House,' a Washington, D.C., Christian fellowship home shared by a number of conservative politicians. In the summer of 2009, the house became infamous as the centre of sex scandals involving three of its residents: Senator John Ensign, Governor Mark Sanford, and Congressman Chip Pickering.Sharlet is the leading expert on 'the Family,' and his undercover research and investigative work answers some of the country's biggest questions: how political fundamentalism endures in America; why, despite the collapse of the old Christian Right, it is as big a threat to democracy as ever before; and where, in a time of political upheaval and culture wars, fundamentalist politicians really intend to lead the country
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    The Churchills

    By Mary S. Lovell
    Authors:
    Mary S. Lovell
    There never was a Churchill from John of Marlborough down who had either morals or principles', so said Gladstone. From the First Duke of Marlborough - soldier of genius, restless empire-builder and cuckolder of Charles II - onwards, the Churchills have been politicians, gamblers and profligates, heroes and womanisers.The Churchills is a richly layered portrait of an extraordinary set of men and women - grandly ambitious, regularly impecunious, impulsive, arrogant and brave. And towering above the Churchill clan is the figure of Winston - his failures and his triumphs shown in a new and revealing context - ultimately our 'greatest Briton'.
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    The Citizen's Constitution

    By Seth Lipsky
    Authors:
    Seth Lipsky
    In this delightfully quick, witty, readable, and authoritative guide, Seth Lipsky, legendary newspaperman, places the United States Constitution and its clauses into context. In more than 300 sparkling annotations- fully updated for this paperback edition- The Citizen's Constitution draws on the writings of the Founders, case law from our greatest judges, and current events. Lipsky provides a no-nonsense, entertaining, and learned reference to the fundamental questions surrounding the document that governs how we govern our country.

    Cry Havoc

    By Joseph Maiolo
    Authors:
    Joseph Maiolo
    Did the arms race of the 1930s cause the Second World War? In Cry Havoc , historian Joseph Maiolo shows, in rich and fascinating detail, how the deadly game of the arms race was played out in the decade prior to the outbreak of the Second World War. In this exhaustively researched account, he explores how nations reacted to the moves of their rivals, revealing the thinking of those making the key decisions,Hitler, Mussolini, Chamberlain, Stalin, Roosevelt,and the dilemmas of democratic leaders who seemed to be faced with a choice between defending their nations and preserving their democratic way of life. An unparalleled account of an era of extreme political tension, Cry Havoc shows how the interwar arms race shaped the outcome of World War II before the shooting even began.

    China Safari

    By Michel Beuret, Serge Michel, Paolo Woods
    Authors:
    Michel Beuret, Serge Michel, Paolo Woods
    China has now taken Great Britain's place as Africa's third largest business partner. Where others only see chaos, the Chinese see opportunities. With no colonial past and no political preconditions, China is bringing investment and needed infrastructure to a continent that has been largely ignored by Western companies or nations. Traveling from Beijing to Khartoum, Algiers to Brazzaville, the authors tell the story of China's economic ventures in Africa. What they find is tantamount to a geopolitical earthquake: The possibility that China will help Africa direct its own fate and finally bring light to the so-called dark continent," making it a force to be reckoned with internationally.

    Cleopatra

    By Joyce Tyldesley
    Authors:
    Joyce Tyldesley
    The Romans regarded her as fatale monstrum ",a fatal omen. Pascal said the shape of her nose changed the history of the world. Shakespeare portrayed her as an icon of tragic love. But who was Cleopatra, really? We almost feel that we know Cleopatra, but our distorted image of a self-destructive beauty does no justice to Cleopatra's true genius. In Cleopatra , Egyptologist Joyce Tyldesley offers an unexpectedly vivid portrait of a skillful Egyptian ruler. Stripping away our preconceptions, many of them as old as Egypt's Roman conquerors, Cleopatra is a magnificent biography of a most extraordinary queen.

    The Cracked Bell

    By Tristram Riley-Smith
    Authors:
    Tristram Riley-Smith
    In this groundbreaking book, Tristram Riley-Smith charts the cultural landscape of a conflicted America in the opening decade of the 21st Century and addresses two key questions: Why is it that a nation that is so clear about its destiny leaves the world confused about its direction of travel; and why is it that a people intent on the pursuit of happiness appears so unsettled?Delving beneath the chaotic surface of American society, Riley-Smith exposes the enduring fault-lines in the cultural bedrock. In doing so, he offers up a panoramic snapshot of American society, flash-lit by the thunderbolts of '9/11', Hurricane Katrina, the 2008 Credit Crash and the inauguration of President Obama.The Cracked Bell gets to the heart of what it means to live in Obama's America, addressing questions of identity and power, belief and value, liberty and law, innovation and tradition, commerce and consumption, nature and civilization, war and peace.
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    A Choice of Enemies

    By Lawrence Freedman
    Authors:
    Lawrence Freedman
    It is in the Middle East that the U.S. has been made to confront its attitudes on the use of force, the role of allies, and international law. The history of the U.S. in the Middle East, then, becomes an especially revealing mirror on America's view of its role in the wider world. In this wise, objective, and illuminating history, Lawrence Freedman shows how three key events in 1978-1979 helped establish the foundations for U.S. involvement in the Middle East that would last for thirty years, without offering any straightforward or bloodless exit options: the Camp David summit leading to the Israel-Egypt Treaty the Iranian Islamic revolution leading to the Shah's departure followed by the hostage crisis and the socialist revolution in Afghanistan, resulting in the doomed Soviet intervention. Drawing on his considerable expertise, Freedman makes clear how America's strategic choices in those and subsequent crises led us to where we are today.