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Phileas Dogg's Guide to Dog Friendly Holidays in Britain

By Jane Common
Authors:
Jane Common
A canine guide to British holidays, seeking out the best dog-friendly days out, beaches, hotels, pubs, campsites, cottages and holidays. An amusing and informative guide, illustrated with photos of different dogs, from pedigrees to mutts, at various locations around Britain. The book builds on the success of the website www.phileasdogg.com, which has been running for 18 months and has a mailing list and social media following in the thousands. The site's main canine correspondent is Attlee, aka Phileas Dogg, a three year old Battersea mongrel, owned by freelance journalist Jane Common. As well as Attlee, the site is written by a team of Rover Reporters from as far afield as the Shetland Isles and Cornwall. In the short time it's been running, the site has been picked up by The Evening Standard and The Guardian - "even if you don't have a dog we urge you to read this"; Waitrose Weekend, Prima, Real People and Dogs Today magazines as well as generating local paper stories around the country, in places where Phileas has visited. Jane has been invited on to BBC Radio as an expert in dog travel and worked with Visit England, the Kennel Club and Battersea Dogs and Cats Home to promote dog-friendly holidays and days out.
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A Place in Italy

By Simon Mawer
Authors:
Simon Mawer
'You can't go and live there,' a despairing friend remarked, 'it's not even in Rome.' And it certainly wasn't, but still the author and his wife went to Avea, tucked away amongst the woods and gorges of the Lazio countryside.There they found no Colosseum, or Pantheon; there were no Ferraris racing around the Palazzi Navona, Venezia or Farnese. Instead they discovered the true agony and beauty of Italy: the instinctive warmth of the Avea villagers, the camorra, Little Tony - Italy's answer to Elvis - the elegant and sophisticated Colasanti family and a landlord like no other, Pippo, the self-styled Duca di Avea. This is not a story of the high culture of Italy's big cities, instead of how two foreigners learned to eat the Italian way, drive the Italian way, survive the Italian way - even to have a child the Italian way - and how in doing it they came to love this hidden corner of the most visited and least understood country in Europe.

The People's Guide to Mexico

By Carl Franz, Lorena Havens, Steve Rogers, Felisa Churpa Rosa Rogers
Authors:
Carl Franz, Lorena Havens, Steve Rogers, Felisa Churpa Rosa Rogers
Over the past 35 years, hundreds of thousands of readers have agreed: This is the classic guide to "living, traveling, and taking things as they come" in Mexico. Now in its updated 14th edition, The People's Guide to Mexico still offers the ideal combination of basic travel information, entertaining stories, and friendly guidance about everything from driving in Mexico City to hanging a hammock to bartering at the local mercado . Features include:Advice on planning your trip, where to go, and how to get around once you're therePractical tips to help you stay healthy and safe, deal with red tape, change money, send email, letters and packages, use the telephone, do laundry, order food, speak like a local, and moreWell-informed insight into Mexican culture, and hints for enjoying traditional fiestas and celebrationsThe most complete information available on Mexican Internet resources, book and map reviews, and other info sources for travellers

The Practical Nomad

By Edward Hasbrouck
Authors:
Edward Hasbrouck
The Practical Nomad provides a global perspective that's necessary whether you're a first-time trekker or an experienced explorer. Now more than ever it is important to understand other cultures, and Edward Hasbrouck's guide makes the ever-changing world more accessible. The fully updated fifth edition of The Practical Nomad: How to Travel Around the World includes:Information on new airport security procedures, travel documents, entry requirements, and border crossings Tips on airline tickets and how to find the best deals without getting ripped off Advice on choosing destinations, routes, and traveling companionsHow to get the time and money for extended travel

Playing Cards In Cairo

By Hugh Miles
Authors:
Hugh Miles
PLAYING CARDS IN CAIRO is a fly-on-the-wall account - like THE BOOKSELLER OF KABUL - of life (for western readers) in a strange and exotic environment. Hugh Miles lives in Cairo and is engaged to an Egyptian woman. Twice a week he plays cards with a small group of Arab, Muslim women and through this medium he explores their lives in modern Cairo, the greatest of Arab cities. It is a secretive, romantic, often deprived but always soulful existence for the women as they struggle with abusive husbands and philandering boyfriends. The book is a window onto a city - and a way of life - which is at a crucial juncture in its history. Hugh Miles, who knows the Arab world intimately, is the perfect guide.
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A Passage To Africa

By George Alagiah
Authors:
George Alagiah
As a five-year-old, George Alagiah emigrated with his family to Ghana - the first African country to attain independence from the British Empire. A PASSAGE TO AFRICA is Alagiah's shattering catalogue of atrocities crafted into a portrait of Africa that is infused with hope, insight and outrage. In vivid and evocative prose and with a fine eye for detail Alagiah's viewpoint is spiked with the freshness of the young George on his arrival in Ghana, the wonder with which he recounts his first impressions of Africa and the affection with which he dresses his stories of his early family life. A sense of possibility lingers, even though the book is full of uncomfortable truths. It is a book neatly balanced on his integrity and sense of obligation in his role as a writer and reporter. The shock of recognition is always there, but it is the personal element that gives A PASSAGE TO AFRICA its originality. Africa becomes not only a group of nations or a vast continent, but an epic of individual pride and suffering.
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  • Paris Was Yesterday

    By Janet Flanner
    Authors:
    Janet Flanner
    In 1925 Janet Flanner began writing a fortnightly 'Letter from Paris' for the nascent New Yorker. Her brief: to tell New Yorkers, under her pen name of 'Genet', what the French thought was going on in France, not what she thought.Paris Was Yesterday is a collection of those letters written in the '20s and '30s, surely one of the most fascinating periods in the city's history, and it reads like an Arts Who's Who. Flanner saw it all and knew everyone (or at least all about them), and there are tidbits galore about the likes of James Joyce, Ernest Hemingway, Isadora Duncan, Diaghilev, Gertrude Stein, Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald, Picasso, Marlena Dietrich... It's witty, catty, literary and unashamedly gossipy, a lively portrait of the thriving cultural life in Paris between the wars. In the brilliantly entertaining style she made her own, Flanner mixed high and low culture to devastating effect.' Cafe Society described from the best table in the place, by a writer with rare & vivid gifts. Make yourself comfortable -- & order up a dry martini' Robert Lacey
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