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Women Who Rock

By Evelyn McDonnell
Authors:
Evelyn McDonnell
From Bessie Smith and The Supremes to Joan Baez, Madonna, Beyonce, Amy Winehouse, Dolly Parton, Sleater-Kinney, Taylor Swift, and scores more, women have played an essential and undeniable role in the evolution of popular music including blues, rock and roll, country, folk, glam rock, punk, and hip hop. Today, in a world traditionally dominated by male artists, women have a stronger influence on popular music than ever before. Yet, not since the late nineteen-nineties has there been a major work that acknowledges and pays tribute to the female artists who have contributed to, defined, and continue to make inroads in music. In WOMEN WHO ROCK, writer and professor of journalism and new media Evelyn McDonnell leads a team of women rock writers and pundits in an all-out celebration of 106 of the greatest female musicians. Organized chronologically, the book profiles each artist and places her in the context of both her genre and the musical world at large. Sidebars throughout recall key moments that shaped both the trajectory of music and how those moments influenced or were influenced by women artists. With full-color illustrated portraits by women artists, Women Who Rock will be THE long-awaited gift book for every musicfan, feminist, and female rocker, young and old.

Women Who Rock Cross-Stitch

By Anna Fleiss, Lauren Mancuso
Authors:
Anna Fleiss, Lauren Mancuso
Let's face it: women rock! Whether dominating stages on a major stadium tour, charming a small coffeehouse, or redefining entire genres, women have always been a powerful force in shaping the course of the music industry. Celebrate their accomplishments in style with Women Who Rock Cross-Stitch, a collection of patterns and stories about some of music's most badass women. With an introduction on the role of women in music, and instructions on the basics of cross-stitch, this book features patterns for embroidering twenty iconic women -- like Fleetwood Mac's Stevie Nicks, soul legend Aretha Franklin, rockstar Joan Jett, and innovator Lauryn Hill -- and ten classic song titles. This charming book provides everything readers need to create crafts that bring their inner divas to center stage!

We Have the Technology

By Kara Platoni
Authors:
Kara Platoni
How do we know what's real? That's not a trick question: sensory science is increasingly finding that we don't perceive reality: we create it through perception. In We Have the Technology , science writer Kara Platoni guides us through the latest developments in the science of sensory perception. We Have the Technology introduces us to researchers who are changing the way we experience the world, whether creating scents that stimulate the memories of Alzheimer's patients, constructing virtual limbs that approximate a sense of touch, or building augmented reality labs that prepare soldiers for the battlefield. These diverse investigations not only explain previously elusive aspects of human experience, but offer tantalizing glimpses into a future when we can expand, control, and enhance our senses as never before.A fascinating tour of human capability and scientific ingenuity, We Have the Technology offers essential insights into the nature and possibilities of human experience.

Willin'

By Ben Fong-Torres
Authors:
Ben Fong-Torres
Formed in 1969 by ex-members of Frank Zappa's Mothers of Invention, Little Feat created groove-heavy music that was an irresistible mix of rock, blues, R&B, country, jazz, soul, and funk. Fronted by the doomed, enigmatic, and charismatic vocalist and slide guitarist Lowell George, they recorded such classic studio albums as Sailin'shoes and Dixie Chicken , as well as what many consider to be one of the best live albums of all time: Waiting for Columbus . After George's tragic death in 1979 and a long period of silence, the band later re-formed in 1987, delighting concert crowds with tight renditions of their beloved songs, including their signature outlaw trucker anthem "Willin'."Acclaimed journalist Ben Fong-Torres, working with surviving band members and their friends and associates, has based Willin' on hours of brand-new interviews with all the key players, resulting in the definitive, first-ever biography of this beloved rock 'n' roll institution.

When I Left Home

By Buddy Guy, David Ritz, Buddy Guy, David Ritz
Authors:
Buddy Guy, David Ritz
Co Writer:
Buddy Guy, David Ritz
According to Eric Clapton, John Mayer, and the late Stevie Ray Vaughn, Buddy Guy is the greatest blues guitarist of all time. An enormous influence on these musicians as well as Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, and Jeff Beck, he is the living embodiment of Chicago blues. Guy's epic story stands at the absolute nexus of modern blues. He came to Chicago from rural Louisiana in the fifties,the very moment when urban blues were electrifying our culture. He was a regular session player at Chess Records. Willie Dixon was his mentor. He was a sideman in the bands of Muddy Waters and Howlin' Wolf. He and Junior Wells formed a band of their own. In the sixties, he became a recording star in his own right. When I Left Home tells Guy's picaresque story in his own unique voice, that of a storyteller who remembers everything, including blues masters in their prime and the exploding, evolving culture of music that happened all around him.

Who Am I and If So How Many?

By Richard David Precht
Authors:
Richard David Precht
There are many books about philosophy, but Who Am I? And If So How Many? is different from the rest. Never before has anyone introduced readers so expertly and, at the same time, so light-heartedly and elegantly to the big philosophical questions.Drawing on neuroscience, psychology, history, and even pop culture, Richard David Precht deftly elucidates the questions at the heart of human existence: What is truth? Does life have meaning? Why should I be good? and presents them in concise, witty, and engaging prose. The result is an exhilarating journey through the history of philosophy and a lucid introduction to current research on the brain.Who Am I? And If So, How Many? is a wonderfully accessible introduction to philosophy. The book is a kaleidoscope of philosophical problems, anecdotal information, neurological and biological science, and psychological research.The books is divided into three parts: 1) What Can I Know? focuses on the brain and the nature and scope of human knowledge, starting with questions posed by Kant, Descartes, Nietzsche, Freud, and others.2) What Should I Do? deals with human morals and ethics, using neurological and sociological research to explain why we empathize with others and are compelled to act morally. Discusses the morality of euthanasia, abortion, cloning, and other controversial topics.3) What Can I Hope For? centers around the most important questions in life: What is happiness and why do we fall in love? Is there a God and how can we prove God's existence? What is freedom? What is the purpose of life?
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When That Rough God Goes Riding

By Greil Marcus
Authors:
Greil Marcus
This book is a quest to understand Van Morrison's particular genius through a close look at the most extraordinary and unclassifiable moments in his long career, beginning in 1965 and continuing in full force to this day: sometimes entire songs, sometimes single words or even the guttural spaces between words that become musical events in themselves.

Why Does E=mc2?

By Brian Cox, Jeff Forshaw
Authors:
Brian Cox, Jeff Forshaw
What does E=mc2 actually mean? Dr. Brian Cox and Professor Jeff Forshaw go on a journey to the frontier of twenty-first century science to unpack Einstein's famous equation. Explaining and simplifying notions of energy, mass, and light,while exploding commonly held misconceptions,they demonstrate how the structure of nature itself is contained within this equation. Along the way, we visit the site of one of the largest scientific experiments ever conducted: the now-famous Large Hadron Collider, a gigantic particle accelerator capable of re-creating conditions that existed fractions of a second after the Big Bang. A collaboration between one of the youngest professors in the United Kingdom and a distinguished popular physicist, Why Does E=mc2? is one of the most exciting and accessible explanations of the theory of relativity.
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Why Beauty Is Truth

By Ian Stewart
Authors:
Ian Stewart
At the heart of relativity theory, quantum mechanics, string theory, and much of modern cosmology lies one concept: symmetry. In Why Beauty Is Truth , world-famous mathematician Ian Stewart narrates the history of the emergence of this remarkable area of study. Stewart introduces us to such characters as the Renaissance Italian genius, rogue, scholar, and gambler Girolamo Cardano, who stole the modern method of solving cubic equations and published it in the first important book on algebra, and the young revolutionary Evariste Galois, who refashioned the whole of mathematics and founded the field of group theory only to die in a pointless duel over a woman before his work was published. Stewart also explores the strange numerology of real mathematics, in which particular numbers have unique and unpredictable properties related to symmetry. He shows how Wilhelm Killing discovered Lie groups" with 14, 52, 78, 133, and 248 dimensions-groups whose very existence is a profound puzzle. Finally, Stewart describes the world beyond superstrings: the octonionic" symmetries that may explain the very existence of the universe.

Whores

By Brendan Mullen
Authors:
Brendan Mullen
Jane's Addiction's 1988 breakthrough album, Nothing's Shocking , had a seismic impact. With a bracing combination of metal, punk, and psychedelia, coupled with lead singer Perry Farrell's banshee-ina- wind-tunnel vocals, Jane's Addiction helped put alternative music on the map. The band helped pave the way for the mainstream success of bands like Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, and Nirvana. Along the way, Jane's Addiction released another classic album, Ritual de lo Habitual (with the hit "Been Caught Stealing"), founded the Lollapalooza festival, and openly celebrated a bacchanalian lifestyle that blurred all lines of gender and sexuality. Drawn from original interviews with the band, their friends, and their musical colleagues, Whores takes readers through Farrell's early sonic experiments with Psi-Com and the formative days of Jane's Addiction to their drug-addled break-up and controversial reunion with 2003's Strays . Along the way it provides a candid, often disturbing glimpse into the dynamic alternative rock scene of Los Angeles in the'80s and'90s.

Why the Toast Always Lands Butter Side Down etc

By Richard Robinson
Authors:
Richard Robinson
The frustrating component of life known as Murphy's (orSod's) Law is no respecter of persons. The more you aredesperate for things to go right, the more they go wrong. But,is that really the case, and, if so, is there a rational explanation?So: when you drop the toast how do you know it will landbutter-side down? Why does the queue you're in always goslowest? That tune you hate - isn't it the one you can't get outof your head? However odd it seems, there is generally ascientific explanation. Much of Murphy's Law stems from theway the mind works - its physical limitations, evolutionarybiases and social impressionability. In this fascinating book,popular-science presenter Richard Robinson teases out theanswers, accessibly and entertainingly.

Watson And DNA

By Victor K. McElheny
Authors:
Victor K. McElheny
The most influential scientist of the last century, James Watson has been at dead centre in the creation of modern molecular biology. This masterful biography brings to life the extraordinary achievements not only of Watson but also all those working on this cutting edge of scientific discovery, such as Walter Gilbert, Francis Crick, François Jacob, and David Baltimore. From the ruthless competition in the race to identify the structure of DNA to a near mutiny in the Harvard biology department, to clashes with ethicists over issues in genetics, Watson has left a wake of detractors as well as fans. Victor McElheny probes brilliantly behind the veil of Watson's own invented persona, bringing us close to the relentless genius and scientific impresario who triggered and sustained a revolution in science.

The Woman Scientist

By Carl J. Sindermann, Clarice M. Yentsch
Authors:
Carl J. Sindermann, Clarice M. Yentsch
An in-depth look at hidden prejudices against women in the scientific fields, and how women can overcome them.

What Evolution Is

By Ernst Mayr
Authors:
Ernst Mayr
At once a spirited defence of Darwinian explanations of biology and an elegant primer on evolution for the general reader, What Evolution Is poses the questions at the heart of evolutionary theory and considers how our improved understanding of evolution has affected the viewpoints and values of modern man.Science Masters Series

Women Changing Science

By Mary Morse
Authors:
Mary Morse
An eye-opening and honest look at the enduring sexism within the scientific community and what women are doing to change it.

Weather

By Arthur Upgren
Authors:
Arthur Upgren
Scientists have delved deep into the smallest particles of matter and have extended their view to the far reaches of the universe, but still they are unable to predict the temperature five days hence. In this intriguing book, two experts in meteorology and astronomy take us on a grand tour of Earth's weather. Amid colourful anecdotes of the Galápagos, Siberia, and places closer to home, they describe the factors involved in shaping our weather, from humidity and prevailing winds to air-pressure systems and the causes of seasonal change. They also explore the history of Earth's climate and its pivotal role in the development of life and human evolution. The authors end with a discussion of the major threats to Earth's atmosphere brought on by human activity, including global warming and ozone depletion, and argue that pure science-not politics-should dictate our policy responses.

Where Mathematics Come From

By George Lakoff, Rafael Nunez
Authors:
George Lakoff, Rafael Nunez
This book is about mathematical ideas, about what mathematics means-and why. Abstract ideas, for the most part, arise via conceptual metaphor-metaphorical ideas projecting from the way we function in the everyday physical world. Where Mathematics Comes From argues that conceptual metaphor plays a central role in mathematical ideas within the cognitive unconscious-from arithmetic and algebra to sets and logic to infinity in all of its forms.

Winning The Game Scientists Play

By Carl Sindermann
Authors:
Carl Sindermann
In this inspiring book of personal insight and sound advice, veteran scientist Carl J. Sindermann gives an insider's look at the competitive world of science and reveals the best strategies for attaining prominence and success. Taking apart the many different roles scientists must play during their careers, Sindermann compares common mistakes scientists make with what the best strategists do-whether they are publishing papers, presenting data, chairing meetings, or coping with government or academic bureaucracy. In the end, he maintains, well-honed interpersonal skills, a savvy eye on one's competitors, and excellent science are the keys to a satisfying and successful career.

World Of Swing

By Stanley Dance
Authors:
Stanley Dance
Now available for a new generation of swing enthusiasts, reissued to coincide with the release of "The World of Swing" CD from Columbia/Legacy, this monumental history of big band jazz, documented through interviews with forty leading musicians, has been updated with a new introduction and discography by Dan Morgenstern.

Why We Feel

By Victor Johnston
Authors:
Victor Johnston
Biopsychologist Victor Johnston explores the origins of human emotions. Drawing on computer science, neurobiology, and evolutionary psychology, he argues that emotions are not an accident of nature, but are instead the basis of learning and reasoning, and help us to adapt to a complex, rapidly changing environment. In the process, he offers a new view of reality - what we see, hear, smell and feel is not an accurate representation of the world around us rather, our feelings are illusions, shaped by millions of years of evolution.