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Not for the Faint of Heart

By Wendy R. Sherman
Authors:
Wendy R. Sherman
The art of diplomacy requires courage, persistence, and above all, authenticity. In Not for the Faint of Heart, Ambassador Wendy Sherman argues that we can all learn to put these qualities to work in our lives. In this book, Sherman shares stories of her time in the State Department negotiating the most sensitive issues of our time (often as the lone woman in the room), along with personal stories that show how our private experiences affect our professional lives. She argues that we negotiate best when we are our authentic selves, not reliant on stratagems or manipulation but on all of the skills we've gained through our experiences.Not for the Faint of Heart brings readers inside the world of international diplomacy and into the mind of one of our most effective diplomatic negotiators, revealing that success takes courage, the ability to forge common ground, and an understanding of the nature and use of power.

No Justice

By Robbie Tolan, Lawrence Ross
Authors:
Robbie Tolan, Lawrence Ross
NO JUSTICE tells the story of a young black man, Robbie Tolan, who was gunned down on his parents' front lawn simply because a white officer failed to follow procedure. And it almost cost him his life.ROBBIE TOLAN, son of 14-year Major League Veteran Bobby Tolan, was a baseball standout at Bellaire High School in Houston, TX. Signing with the Washington Nationals, with dreams of following in his father's footsteps, Robbie's life was destroyed because white Bellaire police officers falsely suspected him of driving a stolen car. Innocent, and instead of being given a chance to defend himself, Robbie was shot inches from his heart in front of his pleading mother and father. Despite the unlikely chances of survival, and grim expectations by doctors, Robbie beat all the odds. He survived the shooting, but his dreams of a major league career did not. The bullet remains in his back as a reminder of the racial profiling that nearly cost him his life. That night transformed a tragedy into a call of justice; not only for Robbie but for the other black men and women being targeted by white police officers who have not had the same outcome. They have been killed over simple excuses, whether jaywalking by Michael Brown, or making an illegal lane change with Sandra Bland. Robbie Tolan's story emphasizes that that it doesn't end with the police encounter. Robbie's hope with this book is to help keep the dialogue alive to find a way to stop police from reaching for their guns when they're not 100 percent certain of the criminal, the crime, or the threat. NO JUSTICE is a poignant, gripping book that sits squarely in the crosshairs of race, police violence, racial profiling, and the ongoing discussion about why African Americans are disproportionately affected by violent police interactions. Finally, a black victim of police violence has lived to speak for those who were killed. And Robbie has something important to say. His case was a precedent setting. It was the first Supreme Court ruling on a race since Brown vs. Board of Education, and thousands of cases have now been heard because of this ruling. The bullet that did not kill him will create justice for others.

Necessary Trouble

By Sarah Jaffe
Authors:
Sarah Jaffe
Necessary Trouble is the definitive book on the movements that are poised to permanently remake American politics. We are witnessing a moment of unprecedented political turmoil and social activism. Over the last few years, we've seen the growth of the Tea Party, a twenty-first-century black freedom struggle with BlackLivesMatter, Occupy Wall Street, and the grassroots networks supporting presidential candidates in defiance of the traditional party elites.Sarah Jaffe leads readers into the heart of these movements, explaining what has made ordinary Americans become activists. As Jaffe argues, the financial crisis in 2008 was the spark, the moment that crystallized that something was wrong. For years, Jaffe crisscrossed the country, asking people what they were angry about, and what they were doing to take power back. She attended a people's assembly in a church gymnasium in Ferguson, Missouri; walked a picket line at an Atlanta Burger King; rode a bus from New York to Ohio with student organizers; and went door-to-door in Queens days after Hurricane Sandy.From the successful fight for a $15 minimum wage in Seattle and New York to the halting of Shell's Arctic drilling program, Americans are discovering the effectiveness of making good, necessary trouble. Regardless of political alignment, they are boldly challenging who wields power in this country.

The New Arab Wars

By Marc Lynch
Authors:
Marc Lynch
Marc Lynch's last book, The Arab Uprising, described the then ongoing revolutionary change and prospect for the consolidation of democracy in key Arab countries that still seemed possible. But Lynch saw dark signs on the horizon, especially in Syria. That book ended with the hope that the Arab uprisings heralded a fundamental change over the long-term, but with the warning that Arab regimes would not easily give up their power. Instead, Egypt's revolution has given way to a military coup; Libya's produced a failed state; Yemen is the battleground for a proxy war and will be destroyed; Syria has become a sprawling humanitarian catastrophe that will take a generation to begin to recover from.At the same time, America has less and less reason to want to engage with the region and now has only one functional ally apart from Israel. The New Arab Wars describes how the political landscape of an entire region has been convulsed, with much of it given over to anarchy, as proxy wars on behalf of three competing powers - Iran, Turkey and Saudi Arabia - scar the region. It is a brutal, compelling story.

Necessary Trouble

By Sarah Jaffe
Authors:
Sarah Jaffe
Necessary Trouble is the definitive book on the movements that are poised to permanently remake American politics. We are witnessing a moment of unprecedented political turmoil and social activism. Over the last few years, we've seen the growth of the Tea Party, a twenty-first-century black freedom struggle with BlackLivesMatter, Occupy Wall Street, and the grassroots networks supporting presidential candidates in defiance of the traditional party elites.Sarah Jaffe leads readers into the heart of these movements, explaining what has made ordinary Americans become activists. As Jaffe argues, the financial crisis in 2008 was the spark, the moment that crystallized that something was wrong. For years, Jaffe crisscrossed the country, asking people what they were angry about, and what they were doing to take power back. She attended a people's assembly in a church gymnasium in Ferguson, Missouri walked a picket line at an Atlanta Burger King rode a bus from New York to Ohio with student organizers and went door-to-door in Queens days after Hurricane Sandy.From the successful fight for a 15 minimum wage in Seattle and New York to the halting of Shell's Arctic drilling program, Americans are discovering the effectiveness of making good, necessary trouble. Regardless of political alignment, they are boldly challenging who wields power in this country.

The New Arab Wars

By Marc Lynch
Authors:
Marc Lynch
Less than twenty-four months after the hope-filled Arab uprising, the popular movement had morphed into a dystopia of resurgent dictators, failed states, and civil wars. Egypt's epochal transition to democracy ended in a violent military coup. Yemen and Libya collapsed into civil war, while Bahrain erupted in smothering sectarian repression. Syria proved the greatest victim of all, ripped apart by internationally fueled insurgencies and an externally supported, bloody-minded regime. Amidst the chaos, a virulently militant group declared an Islamic State, seizing vast territories and inspiring terrorism across the globe. What happened? The New Arab Wars is a profound illumination of the causes of this nightmare. It details the costs of the poor choices made by regional actors, delivers a scathing analysis of Western misreadings of the conflict, and condemns international interference that has stoked the violence. Informed by commentators and analysts from the Arab world, Marc Lynch's narrative of a vital region's collapse is both wildly dramatic and likely to prove definitive. Most important, he shows that the region's upheavals have only just begun,and that the hopes of Arab regimes and Western policy makers to retreat to old habits of authoritarian stability are doomed to fail.

National Insecurity

By David Rothkopf
Authors:
David Rothkopf
In the wake of 9/11, America and its people have experienced a sense of vulnerability unprecedented in the nation's recent history. Buffeted by challenges from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan to the financial crisis, from Washington dysfunction to the rise of China and the dawn of the era of cyber warfare, two very different presidents and their advisors have struggled to cope with a relentless array of new threats.You may think you know the story. But in National Insecurity , David Rothkopf offers an entirely new perspective into the hidden struggles, the surprising triumphs, and the shocking failures of those charged with leading the United States through one of the most difficult periods in its history. Thanks to his extraordinary access, Rothkopf provides fresh insights drawing on more than one hundred exclusive interviews with the key players who shaped this era.At its core, National Insecurity is the gripping story of a superpower in crisis, seeking to adapt to a rapidly changing world, sometimes showing inspiring resilience,but often undone by the human flaws of those at the top, the mismanagement of its own system, the temptation to concentrate too much power within the hands of too few in the White House itself, and an unwillingness to draw the right lessons from the recent past. Nonetheless, within that story are unmistakable clues to a way forward that can help restore American leadership.

The Neoconservative Persuasion

By Irving Kristol
Authors:
Irving Kristol
A brilliant collection of pieces, written between 1942 and his death in 2009, by Irving Kristol, one of the fathers of neoconservatism. This series of essays, many hard to find and reprinted for the first time since their initial appearance, offers a wide ranging survey of the history of neoconservatism in America. Kristol covers a broad range of topics from the neoconservative movement's roots in the 40s at City College through the triumph of Reagan and the muddle of the Iraq war. Along the way, we experience the creative development of one of the most important public intellectuals of the modern age, a man who played an extraordinarily influential role in the development of American intellectual and political culture over the past half-century. This illuminating collection features a foreword by Irving's son Bill Kristol and is edited by Irving's widow, Gertrude Himmelfarb (aka Bee Kristol), a notable conservative voice in her own right.

Nuclear Terrorism

By Graham Allison
Authors:
Graham Allison
Americans in the twenty-first century are keenly aware of the many forms of terrorism: hijackings, biological attacks, chemical weapons. But, the deadliest form is almost too scary to think about - a terrorist group exploding a nuclear device in an American city. In the urgent call to action, Graham Allison, one of America's leading experts on nuclear weapons and national security, presents the evidence for two provocative, compelling conclusions. First, if policy makers in Washington keep doing what they are currently doing about the threat, a nuclear terrorist attack on America is inevitable. Second, the surprising and largely unrecognized good news is that nuclear terrorism is, in fact, preventable. Allison offers an ambitious but feasible blueprint for eliminating the possibility of nuclear terrorist attacks, if we are willing to face the issue squarely.

The Next Gulf

By Andrew Rowell, Lorne Stockman
Authors:
Andrew Rowell, Lorne Stockman
On November 10, 1995 the Nigerian government executed activist and author Ken Saro-Wiwa along with eight other Ogoni activists. Their deaths brought the plight of their people and the role of British oil companies in Nigeria to the attention of the world. Ten years on, Nigeria and the other oil-producing countries of West Africa have only grown in strategic and economic importance to both Europe and the United States. The recent coup in Sao Tomé and the botched attempt in Equatorial Guinea both indicate that the West is taking a much closer interest in the region. Recent history suggests that the people of West Africa will receive little benefit from the revenues from oil and gas, and that they will suffer instead from the dire environmental effects of pollution. Andrew Rowell and James Marriott here explain how western companies cooperate with local elites in West Africa to maintain control and they trace a long and ongoing history of colonial and neo-colonial exploitation. They explore Washington and London's new interest in the region and they report on the efforts of local people to ensure that the benefits of development are shared more equally.

The Next Deal

By Andrei Cherny
Authors:
Andrei Cherny
The Next Deal offers a highly readable blueprint for politics in the twenty-first century. The old-style one-size-fits-all government, Cherny argues, cannot accommodate the significant changes-including the moral revolution of the'60s and the technological revolution of the last fifteen years-that American society has undergone. Cherny proposes a "Next Deal" that will expand democracy by taking decision-making power out of the hands of experts and back into the hands of ordinary people.

Nixon Reconsidered

By Joan Hoff
Authors:
Joan Hoff
An eye-opening look at the man whose notoriety over Watergate and whose accomplishments in foreign policy have made us foget that he was one of our most innovative modern presidents on matters of domestic policy. Hoff shows that Nixon's reforms in welfare, civil rights, economic and environmental policy, and reorganization of the federal bureaucracy all greatly outweigh those things for which we tend to remember him.
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