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Liars, Leakers, and Liberals

By Jeanine Pirro
Authors:
Jeanine Pirro
As an online commentator and host of her own show on Fox for many years, Judge Jeanine Pirro has seen firsthand how narratives take form, whether they are based in truth or not. In her explosive new book, she will write about some of the most egregious lies she's seen, and also interview various people who have been affected by fake news stories.Judge Jeanine will begin at her home base, Fox, and discuss her own experiences.Judge Jeanine believes that many modern-day feminists are promoting the lie that women have been oppressed by men since the beginning of time. She'll talk about Hillary Clinton, and the lie that if you didn't support her, you are a woman hater. Judge Jeanine will interview Ivanka Trump about this, and mention the different ways mainstream press talks about conservative women vs liberals.No topic is off limits in LIARS, LEAKERS, AND LIBERALS. Judge Jeanine will take on:* Antifa* Black Lives Matter and the media lie that set off race riots around the country* Obama - The reality of what Trump inherited regarding foreign and domestic messes* Trump - How the media has twisted his words to fit the narrative they've created, including firsthand accounts from people like Eric Trump and Corey Lewandowski* Anonymous sources and what can be done to curb the damage they doLeakers in the White House - why it really is a big deal, examples through history of leakers* Safe Spaces - The world is not safe. If you're old enough to go to war, you're old enough to hear an opinion you don't like.LIARS, LEAKERS, AND LIBERALS is Judge Jeanine's no-holds-barred answer to fake news, and it promises to be an enlightening and provocative read!

The Long Game

By Derek Chollet
Authors:
Derek Chollet
In this inside assessment of Barack Obama's foreign policy legacy, Derek Chollet tackles the prevailing consensus to argue that Obama has profoundly altered the course of American foreign policy for the better and positioned the United States to lead in the future. The Long Game combines a deep sense of history with new details and compelling insights into how the Obama Administration approached the most difficult global challenges. With the unique perspective of having served at the three national security power centres during the Obama years- the White House, State Department, and Pentagon- Chollet takes readers behind the scenes of the intense struggles over the most consequential issues: the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the meltdown of Syria and rise of ISIS, the Ukraine crisis and a belligerent Russia, the conflict in Libya, the tangle with Iran, the turbulent relationship with Israel, and the rise of new powers like China.An unflinching, fast-paced account of U.S. foreign policy, The Long Game reveals how Obama has defied the Washington establishment to redefine America's role in the world, offering important lessons for the next president.

Lords of Secrecy

By Scott Horton
Authors:
Scott Horton
State secrecy is increasingly used as the explanation for the shrinking of public discussion surrounding national security issues. The phrase that's classified" is increasingly used not to protect national secrets from legitimate enemies, but rather to stifle public discourse regarding national security. Washington today is inclined to see secrecy as a convenient cure to many of its problems. But too often these problems are not challenges to national security, they involve the embarrassment of political figures, disclosure of mismanagement, incompetence and corruption and even outright criminality.For national security issues to figure in democratic deliberation, the public must have access to basic facts that underlie the issues. The more those facts disappear under a cloak of state secrecy, the less space remains for democratic process and the more deliberation falls into the hands of largely unelected national security elites. The way out requires us to think much more critically and systematically about secrecy and its role in a democratic state.
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The Last Great Senate

By Ira Shapiro
Authors:
Ira Shapiro
Journalists have called the U.S. Senate an empty chamber politicians have lamented that the institution is broken,yet the Senate was once capable of greatness. Senators of the 1960s and 1970s overcame southern opposition to civil rights, passed Great Society legislation, and took the lead in opposing the Vietnam War and holding Richard Nixon accountable for the abuses of Watergate. The Last Great Senate is a vivid portrait of the statesmen who helped steer America during the crisis years of the late 1970s, transcending partisanship and overcoming procedural roadblocks that have all but strangled the Senate since their departure.

Living with Guns

By Craig Whitney
Authors:
Craig Whitney
Newtown. Columbine. Virginia Tech. Tucson. Aurora. Gun violence on a massive scale has become a plague in our society, yet politicians seem more afraid of having a serious conversation about guns than they are of the next horrific shooting. Any attempt to change the status quo, whether to strengthen gun regulations or weaken them, is sure to degenerate into a hysteria that changes nothing. Our attitudes toward guns are utterly polarized, leaving basic questions unasked: How can we reconcile the individual right to own and use firearms with the right to be safe from gun violence? Is keeping guns out of the hands of as many law-abiding Americans as possible really the best way to keep them out of the hands of criminals? And do 30,000 of us really have to die by gunfire every year as the price of a freedom protected by the Constitution? In Living with Guns , Craig R. Whitney, former foreign correspondent and editor at the New York Times , seeks out answers. He re-examines why the right to bear arms was enshrined in the Bill of Rights, and how it came to be misunderstood. He looks to colonial times, surveying the degree to which guns were a part of everyday life. Finally, blending history and reportage, Whitney explores how twentieth-century turmoil and culture war led to today's climate of activism, partisanship, and stalemate, in a nation that contains an estimated 300 million guns- and probably at least 60 million gun owners. In the end, Whitney proposes a new way forward through our gun rights stalemate, showing how we can live with guns- and why, with so many of them around, we have no other choice.

Liberty Defined

By Ron Paul
Authors:
Ron Paul
Dr. Ron Paul's newest book, LIBERTY DEFINED, returns to the format and scope of his no 1 New York Times bestseller The Revolution. Rather than delve so deeply into one issue (as End The Fed did) or simply update the topics discussed in The Revolution, this is a brand new, comprehensive, A-Z guide to his position (unwavering support of personal liberty and small government) on 50 of the most important issues of our times, both foreign and domestic. His devoted followers will be able to use it as a guide book for 2012 and beyond, for all their political and educational efforts. With entries ranging in length from a few pages to over ten, LIBERTY DEFINED is very accessible, easy to digest and clear cut in its ideology.

Landmark

By Staff of the Washington Post
Authors:
Staff of the Washington Post
The Washington Post 's must-read guide to the health care overhaul What now? Despite the rancorous, divisive, year-long debate in Washington, many Americans still don't understand what the historic overhaul of the health care system will- or won't- mean. In Landmark , the national reporting staff of The Washington Post pierces through the confusion, examining the new law's likely impact on us all: our families, doctors, hospitals, health care providers, insurers, and other parts of a health care system that has grown to occupy one-sixth of the U.S. economy. Landmark's behind-the-scenes narrative reveals how just how close the law came to defeat, as well as the compromises and deals that President Obama and his Democratic majority in Congress made in achieving what has eluded their predecessors for the past seventy-five years: A legislative package that expands and transforms American health care coverage. Landmark is an invaluable resource for anyone eager to understand the changes coming our way.

Let Us Talk of Many Things

By William F. Buckley Jr.
Authors:
William F. Buckley Jr.
Let Us Talk of Many Things , first published in 2000, brings together Buckley's finest speeches from throughout his career. Always deliciously provocative, they cover a vast range of topics: the end of the Cold War, manners in politics, the failure of the War on Drugs, the importance of winning the America's Cup, and much else. Reissued with additional speeches, Let Us Talk of Many Things is the ideal gift for any serious conservative.

Letters from Young Activists

By Chesa Boudin, Dan Berger, Kenyon Farrow, Bernadine Dohrn
Authors:
Chesa Boudin, Dan Berger, Kenyon Farrow, Bernadine Dohrn
Who will lead America in the years to come? Letters from Young Activists introduces America's bold, exciting, new generation of activists. These diverse authors challenge the common misconception that today's young people are apathetic, shallow, and materialistic. Aged ten to thirty-one, these atheist, Christian, Jewish, Muslim, pagan, transgender, heterosexual, bisexual, metrosexual Americans are from every type of background and ethnicity, but are united by their struggle toward a common goal. They are the inheritors of their parents' legacy from the sixties, but also have the imagination and courage to embark on new paths and different directions. In letters addressed to their parents, to past generations, to each other, to the youth of tomorrow and to their future selves, each author articulates his or her vision for the world as they work towards racial, economic, gender, environmental and global justice. As the editors write in their introduction: "From globalization to the war on terrorism and beyond, our generation is compelled to action in the midst of a rapidly changing, and unique political moment Our challenge, and yours, is to live our lives in a way that does not make a mockery of our values."

Letters to a Young Contrarian

By Christopher Hitchens
Authors:
Christopher Hitchens
In the book that he was born to write, provocateur and best-selling author Christopher Hitchens inspires future generations of radicals, gadflies, mavericks, rebels, angry young (wo)men, and dissidents. Who better to speak to that person who finds him or herself in a contrarian position than Hitchens, who has made a career of disagreeing in profound and entertaining ways.This book explores the entire range of "contrary positions"-from noble dissident to gratuitous pain in the butt. In an age of overly polite debate bending over backward to reach a happy consensus within an increasingly centrist political dialogue, Hitchens pointedly pitches himself in contrast. He bemoans the loss of the skills of dialectical thinking evident in contemporary society. He understands the importance of disagreement-to personal integrity, to informed discussion, to true progress-heck, to democracy itself. Epigrammatic, spunky, witty, in your face, timeless and timely, this book is everything you would expect from a mentoring contrarian.

Lessons And Legacies

By D. David Eisenhower Iii, Norman J. Ornstein
Authors:
D. David Eisenhower Iii, Norman J. Ornstein
A remarkable collection of farewell addresses by the thirteen U.S. senators who voluntarily retired in 1996-Bill Bradley, Hank Brown, William S. Cohen, J. James Exon, Mark O. Hatfield, Howell Heflin, J. Bennett Johnston, Nancy Landon Kassebaum, Sam Nunn, Claiborne Pell, David Pryor, Paul Simon, and Alan K. Simpson.

The Last Empire

By Gore Vidal
Authors:
Gore Vidal
Gore Vidal's new collection of essays shows him still writing at his finest. His comments on the deplorable state of American politics - from Bill Clinton to George Bush - are as apposite as ever and, controversially, there are two magnificent essays on the Oklahoma bomber Timothy McVeigh - who entered into an extraordinary correspondence with Vidal when he was in gaol - to the recent terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center.

License To Steal

By Malcolm K Sparrow
Authors:
Malcolm K Sparrow
Who steals? An extraordinary range of folk- from low-life hoods who sign on as Medicare or Medicaid providers equipped with nothing more than beepers and mailboxes, to drug trafficking organizations, organized crime syndicates, and even major hospital chains. In License to Steal , Malcolm K. Sparrow shows how the industry's defences, which focus mostly on finding and correcting billing errors, are no match for such well orchestrated attacks. The maxim for thieves simply becomes "bill your lies correctly." Provided they do that, fraud perpetrators with any degree of sophistication can steal millions of dollars with impunity, testing payment systems carefully, and then spreading fraudulent billings widely enough across patient and provider accounts to escape detection. The kinds of highly automated, quality controlled claims processing systems that pervade the industry present fraud perpetrators with their favourite kind of target: rich, fast paying, transparent, utterly predictable check printing systems, with little threat of human intervention, and with the U.S. Treasury on the end of the electronic line. Sparrow picks apart the industry's response to the government's efforts to control this problem. The provider associations (well heeled and politically influential) have vociferously opposed almost every recent enforcement initiative, creating the unfortunate public impression that the entire health care industry is against effective fraud control. A significant segment of the industry, it seems, regards fraud and abuse not as a problem, but as a lucrative enterprise worth defending. Meanwhile, it remains a perfectly commonplace experience for patients or their relatives to examine a medical bill and discover that half of it never happened, or that likewise, if patients then complain, they discover that no one seems to care, or that no one has the resources to do anything about it.Sparrow's research suggests that the growth of capitated managed care systems does not solve the problem, as many in the industry had assumed, but merely changes its form. The managed care environment produces scams involving underutilization , and the withholding of medical care schemes that are harder to uncover and investigate, and much more dangerous to human health. Having worked extensively with federal and state officials since the appearance of his first book on this subject, Sparrow is in a unique position to evaluate recent law enforcement initiatives. He admits the "war on fraud" is at least now engaged, but it is far from won.

The Limits Of Privacy

By Amitai Etzioni
Authors:
Amitai Etzioni
Privacy is perhaps the most hallowed of American rights,and most people are concerned that new technologies available to governments and corporations threaten to erode this most privileged of rights. But in The Limits of Privacy, Amitai Etzioni offers a decidedly different point of view, in which the right to privacy is balanced against concern for public safety and health. Etzioni looks at five flashpoint issues: Megan's Laws, HIV testing of infants, deciphering of encrypted messages, national identification cards, and medical records, and concludes that there are times when Amricans' insistence on privacy is not in the best interests of society at large. He offers four clear and concise criteria which, when applied jointly, help us to determine when the right to privacy should be overridden for the greater public good.Almost every week headlines warn us that our cell phones are being monitored, our e-mails read, and our medical records traded on the open market. Public opinion polls show that Americans are dismayed about incursions against personal privacy. Congress and state legislatures are considering laws designed to address their concerns.Focusing on five flashpoint issues,Megan's Law, mandatory HIV testing of infants, encryption of electronic documents, national identification cards and biometric identifiers, and medical records,The Limits of Privacy argues counterintuitively that sometimes major public health and safety concerns should outweigh the individual's right to privacy. Presenting four concise criteria to determine when the right to privacy should be preserved and when it should be overridden in the interests of the wider community, Etzioni argues that, in some cases, we would do well to sacrifice the privacy of the individual in the name of the common good.
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