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Big Money

By Kenneth P. Vogel
Authors:
Kenneth P. Vogel
Mark Hanna,the turn-of-the-century iron-and-coal-magnate-turned-operative who leveraged massive contributions from the robber barons,was famously quoted as saying: There are two things that are important in politics. The first is money, and I can't remember what the second one is." To an extent that would have made Hanna blush, a series of developments capped by the Supreme Court's 2010 Citizens United decision effectively crowned a bunch of billionaires and their operatives the new kings of politics. Big Money is a rollicking tour of a new political world dramatically reordered by ever-larger flows of cash. Ken Vogel has breezed into secret gatherings of big-spending Republicans and Democrats alike,from California poolsides to DC hotel bars,to brilliantly expose the way the mega-money men (and rather fewer women) are dominating the new political landscape.Great wealth seems to attach itself to outsize characters. From the casino magnate Sheldon Adelson to the bubbling nouveau cowboy Foster Friess from the Texas trial lawyer couple, Amber and Steve Mostyn, to the micromanaging Hollywood executive Jeffrey Katzenberg,the multimillionaires and billionaires are swaggering up to the tables for the hottest new game in politics. The prize is American democracy, and the players' checks keep getting bigger.

Big, Hot, Cheap, and Right

By Erica Grieder
Authors:
Erica Grieder
Erica Grieder's Texas is a state that is not only an outlier but an exaggeration of some of America's most striking virtues and flaws. Big, Hot, Cheap, and Right is a witty, enlightening inquiry into how Texas works, and why, in the future, the rest of America may look a lot like Texas.
  • A Brief History of the Spy

    By Paul Simpson
    Authors:
    Paul Simpson
    From the end of the Second World War to the present day, the world has changed immeasurably. The art of spying has changed too, as spies have reacted to changing threats. Here you will find the fascinating stories of real-life spies, both famous and obscure, from either side of the Iron Curtain, along with previously secret details of War on Terror operations.Detailed stories of individual spies are set in the context of the development of the major espionage agencies, interspersed with anecdotes of gadgets, trickery, honeytraps and assassinations worthy of any fictional spy.A closing section examines the developing New Cold War, as Russia and the West confront each other once again.
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    The Brief Against Obama

    By Hugh Hewitt
    Authors:
    Hugh Hewitt
    In late April of 2011, nationally syndicated talk show host, law professor and New York Times bestselling author Hugh Hewitt asked his radio audience for their reasons why they wouldn't vote for President Obama's re-election. A tidal wave of answers flowed in, and Hewitt quickly started "The Obama Project" to catalogue and rank the answers. THE BRIEF AGAINST OBAMA is the top 50 reasons to vote against the president, short essays that dive into the many accounts of why our current leader is unfit for reelection. Topics include:1. Obamacare 2. The failed $850 billion stimulus 3. High, persistent unemployment 4. Gas prices 5. The 2012 budget's fecklessness 6. Massive deficits each and every year 12. The Libyan Fiasco 16. The President's push for cap and tax in the Congress ...and the list goes on.This book is the perfect primer for any anti-Obama voter seeking to sharpen their arguments or to give to the undecided in their lives, as the crucial election approaches.
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    The Beijing Consensus

    By Stefan Halper
    Authors:
    Stefan Halper
    Beijing presents a clear and gathering threat to Washington,but not for the reasons you think. China's challenge to the West stems from its transformative brand of capitalism and an entirely different conception of the international community. In The Beijing Consensus , a leading expert in international relations presents a coherent integration of the many sides of U.S.-China relations.
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    The Battle

    By Arthur C. Brooks
    Authors:
    Arthur C. Brooks
    America faces a new culture war- one that threatens our long-standing culture of free enterprise. Free enterprise embodies the values that define us as a nation: individual liberty, equal opportunity, entrepreneurship, and self-reliance. But the recent economic crisis has distorted these values, leading many Americans to forget the evils of socialism- which, as Arthur C. Brooks reveals, is back with a vengeance. Its proponents are playing for keeps, and if they win, America will be changed forever, both economically and culturally. At once a call to action and a crucial redefinition of the gulf that divides Americans, The Battle offers a plan of action for the defence of free enterprise, the very soul of America.
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    Bog-Standard Britain

    By Quentin Letts
    Authors:
    Quentin Letts
    No one would attack equality, would they? Quentin Letts just might. Not the notion of equality itself but the way it has become an industry for lobbyists, class warriors and New Labour's ageing Trots.Egalitarianism is a mania for today's policymakers and the soupy-brained halfwits we contrive to elect to public office. Appalled by free thinking, these equality junkies want to crush all individualism in our nation of once indignant eccentrics.Equality has been defiled by the ethnic grievance gang, by the harpies of feminist orthodoxy, by those risk-averse jackboots of town-hall bureaucracy with their quotas and creeds. Fair damsel Liberty has been whored by the best practice brigade, by the proceduralists of multinational corporatism in their company ties, by the glottal-stopping, municipal bores who insist that everyone must have prizes and that no culture can be dominant.Tilters against convention are assailed for their 'inappropriate' behaviour. Supporters of grammar schools are 'snobs'. Social nuance, once a vital lure to self-improvement, is deemed 'unacceptable'.Twenty-first century Britain's political cadre is so paralysed by class paranoia that it stops us attaining the best in schools, manners, language, fashion, popular culture. Elitism is a dirty word. The BBC stamps out the Queen's English because it is not 'accessible'. Celebrity morons are cultural pin-ups. Thick rools, OK. The glottal-stopping oikishness of our urban streets can be linked to modern equality's refusal to deplore. The prattishness of Jonathan Ross arises from a mad insistence that vulgarity is valid.Still think equality is such a great thing? You might not after reading this urgent, exasperated, witheringly funny book.Praise for 50 People Who Buggered Up Britain:'[Quentin Letts] discharges his duty with flair and tracer precision...an angry book, beautifully written.' The Spectator
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    Bad Laws

    By Philip Johnston
    Authors:
    Philip Johnston
    Over the past thirteen years, New Labour has made us wade through a quagmire of petty rules, health and safety lunacies, madcap laws and nitpicking regulations. We have been snooped on, hectored and hounded by state nannies from cradle to grave, all because government and its agencies have nothing better to do than to interfere in our lives. It would not be so bad if the Government ran the country well, but we have to put up with high taxes, street crime, late and dirty trains, the unjustified and disproportionate use of fines and charges, bloody-minded parking restrictions, excessive public sector waste, preposterous European directives, useless and unaccountable council officials and multi-culturalist busybodies.In this explosive and groundbreaking new book, Philip Johnston makes a stand and exposes the 'Bad Laws', those irritating laws, regulations and Whitehall idiocies that make life in Britain the day-to-day nightmare that it is today.He covers the following laws amongst many others:The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (Ripa) or "snooper's charter", allows a wide range of government bodies and quangos to watch over people, check on what they are doing and monitor their communications. The Safeguarding Vulnerable People Act...which will require 11 million people working with children or the elderly to obtain a certificate allowing them to continue to do so yet will be easily evaded by those few individuals who are a danger to children.The Hunting Act. More foxes have died every year since the Act came into force. The Children Act. All 25,000 state and private nursery schools, child minders and playgroups are required to follow a new statutory framework dubbed the "nappy curriculum". Smoking Ban - It has interfered both with personal freedom and with commercial enterprise. Housing Act - which brought us Hips in the midst of a property price slump.European Arrest Warrant - which allows British citizens to be extradited to another jurisdiction to stand trial for an offence that is not a crime in the UK.Dangerous Dogs Act, which became synonymous with hasty and ill-thought-out legislation. Firearms Act which wiped out the sport and livelihoods of thousands of law abiding people.War Crimes Act, pushed through using the Parliament Act but which has resulted in not a single conviction.Religious Hatred Act which made a bad thought a crime.Numerous Health and safety laws of every description.The Licensing Act which made it an offence to play a piano in a pub without authorisation.
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    Beyond the Revolution

    By William H. Goetzmann
    Authors:
    William H. Goetzmann
    From 1776, when Citizen Tom Paine declared, The birthday of a new world is at hand," America was unique in world history. A nation suffused with the spirit of explorers, constantly replenished by immigrants, and informed by a continual influx of foreign ideas, it was the world's first truly cosmopolitan civilization. In Beyond the Revolution , Pulitzer Prize-winning historian William H. Goetzmann tells the story of America's greatest thinkers and creators, from Paine and Jefferson to Melville and William James, showing how they built upon and battled one another's ideas in the critical years between 1776 and 1900. An unprecedented work of intellectual history by a master historian, this book will be essential reading for anyone interested in the origins of our national culture.
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    The Best Democracy Money Can Buy

    By Greg Tobin
    Authors:
    Greg Tobin
    Palast, an investigative reporter, spent five years trying to find out what is really going on in politics and big business. In this volume he reveals what PR companies, lobbyists and politicians spend their time keeping hidden. Using sources inside the global institutions he establishes that the IMF and the World Bank serve the interests of the very rich in Europe and America. In a series of sting operations he reveals how far the Labour government was prepared to go in its attempts to gain the support of big business, and his report on the American presidental election makes it clear that the wrong man is in the White House.
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    Birth Or Abortion

    By Kate Maloy, Maggie Jones Patterson
    Authors:
    Kate Maloy, Maggie Jones Patterson
    Many Americans who believe that women should be able to choose when and whether to bear a child are also deeply disturbed by the one-and-one-half million abortions performed each year in this country. They regard these concerns as irreconcilable, because the topic of abortion, until now, has been framed as a black-or-white conflict between the rights of the mother and those of the fetus. The very idea of compromise or common cause draws scorn among factions. How, after all, can the political debate about abortion permit any more options than pregnancy itself does? This extraordinary book tells fifty stories about women from strikingly diverse backgrounds who have had to choose whether to give birth or to abort. About half of these women carried their pregnancies to term the others ended them. Their decisions arose from heartfelt struggles, expressed in terms completely different from those that prevail in the public debate. Some women who abhor abortion ended up choosing that option others who are prochoice opted for birth or had abortions that, in some instances, caused them sorrow or regret. The outcome of nearly every private dilemma hung on practical and emotional matters - the quality of the connection between the woman and the man, the financial resources available, the number of children the woman already had, the state of her self-esteem, and the health of the fetus - rather than on the weighing of rights. These insightful and eloquent authors hold up a mirror to our society and show us that we have pitted mother against fetus. They ask whether we have emphasized the rights of individuals at the expense of human responsibility and care. This most intellectually challenging yetsensitive book transcends all other books on this topic. The complexity and rich nuances of the stories it tells permits us to see this controversy with new eyes. These stories, woven together, are our nation's story - one that has never been told by the long and angry debate. Once we learn to hear these women, we may also learn to listen to one another and work toward common values and moral responsibility.|This book tells fifty stories about women from strikingly diverse backgrounds who have had to choose whether to give birth or to abort.
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    The Blair Effect

    By Anthony Seldon
    Authors:
    Anthony Seldon
    THE BLAIR EFFECT is a collection of authoritative and (reasonably) unpartisan commentaries on the first administration of Tony Blair as it approaches a General Election. The authors demonstrate that it is possible to write contemporary history about even the most recent past in an accessible yet scrupulously objective manner. How much has changed since the landslide election victory of May 1997? What was prompting the changes, and to what extent were they the fruit of number 10's intentions? How far might they have happened anyway? How effective has the Blair effect been? Peter Riddell, Vernon Bogdanor, Dennis Kavanagh and a host of other star analysts pose these questions and do their best to answer them.
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    Bucking The Deficit

    By G Calvin Mackenzie, Saranna Thornton
    Authors:
    G Calvin Mackenzie, Saranna Thornton
    For years now, Americans have called for a balanced budget, debt reduction, and fiscal sanity. Yet the federal government continues to spend beyond its income, driving the level of federal debt up and public confidence down. Why is that? Why have the monsters of public finance,pork-barrel spending, entitlements, and the deficit,remained unchecked for so long? What effects have they had on our economy and our politics? What, if anything, can be done to tame them?This concise, well-written primer of American political economy offers answers to these questions and more, all the while covering a vast and complicated intellectual terrain in an accessible and engaging way. Political scientist G. Calvin Mackenzie and economist Saranna Thornton combine forces here to clear up some of the mysteries of contemporary economic theory and practice. They take us on a sweeping tour of the economic turning points in our national history and then go on to discuss what it will take to make sound economic policy and, ultimately, good government for the twenty-first century.Everyone,but especially students of American government, public policy, economics, and business,should have a copy of this on the shelf to help them make sense of the economic news and its political ramifications.
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    The Black Book Of Bosnia

    By Nader Mousavizadeh
    Authors:
    Nader Mousavizadeh
    The war in the former Yugoslavia has shamed the leading nations of the world. Unspeakable crimes against humanity have been committed in Bosnia, Croatia and Serbia, yet American and European policymakers have cravenly stood aside while whole villages and communities were erased from the face of the earth.Americans are appalled by the images on their television screens of the carnage, but most of us are confused. What are the issues that have brought this conflict to a head? How can it be that fifty years after the Nazi Holocaust, the civilized world is once again unable to stem a tide of atrocities that include concentration camps and civilian massacres?One of the few consistent voices raised against aggression and genocide in the Balkans has been that of The New Republic. The Black Book of Bosnia brings together the magazine's best analysis, reportage, commentary, and editorials to explain how the war came to pass and what it portends for America, the West and the world.The essays in this volume offer a road map through the tangled history of the Balkans, along with vivid on-the-scene reports that reveal the bloody aftermath in our own time. And the magazine's editorials, written throughout the course of the war, themselves tell a story of missed opportunities and moral abdication. Future generations will see Bosnia as the first test of the post-Cold War international order, and this book reveals how and why the West failed the test.
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    Broken Contract?

    By Stephen C Craig
    Authors:
    Stephen C Craig
    In 1992, it was Bill Clinton's New Covenant. In 1994, it was the Republicans' Contract with America. In 1996, it is likely to be a whole new set of circumstances. Nonetheless, one theme will prevail: Citizens and their government distrust one another, and it will take major changes on both sides to restore confidence in the relationship. Broken Contract? describes the elements of voter disaffection, party decline, mass mediation, social conflict, and government by referendum so prevalent in the politics of the 1990s. Original essays by leading scholars provide a unique perspective on what is happening today, how we arrived at this point, and what the future may hold if present trends continue. Highlights include innovative insights into the politics of disillusion along race, class, and gender lines the Perot people" of '92, where they went in '94 and will go in '96 and talk-show democracy," from Larry King to Rush Limbaugh and the power of televangelism. Broken Contract? is a volume with a finger on the pulse of the temperament of the times. It demonstrates, in an engaging and accessible fashion, that the Contract with America is neither the first nor the last bargain to be struck with the American public in an effort to mend its broken trust.
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    Bound To Lead

    By Joseph S. Nye, Jr.
    Authors:
    Joseph S. Nye, Jr.
    Is America still Number 1? A leading scholar of international politics and former State Department official takes issue with Paul Kennedy and others and clearly demonstrates that the United States is still the dominant world power, with no challenger in sight. But analogies about decline only divert policy makers from creating effective strategies for the future, says Nye. The nature of power has changed. The real-and unprecedented-challenge is managing the transition to growing global interdependence.
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    Breaking The Impasse

    By Jeffrey Cruikshank, Lawrence Susskind
    Authors:
    Jeffrey Cruikshank, Lawrence Susskind
    Drawing on his experience in the MIT-Harvard Public Disputes Program, a leading mediator and his co-author provide the first jargon-free guide to consensual strategies for resolving public disputes,indispensable to citizen activists and to business and government leaders.
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