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Victory City

By John Strausbaugh
Authors:
John Strausbaugh
New York City during World War II wasn't just a place of servicemen, politicians, heroes, G.I. Joes and Rosie the Riveters, but also of quislings and saboteurs; of Nazi, Fascist, and Communist sympathizers; of war protesters and conscientious objectors; of gangsters and hookers and profiteers; of latchkey kids and bobby-soxers, poets and painters, atomic scientists and atomic spies.While the war launched and leveled nations, spurred economic growth, and saw the rise and fall of global Fascism, New York City would eventually emerge as the new capital of the world. From the Gilded Age to VJ-Day, an array of fascinating New Yorkers rose to fame, from Mayor Fiorello La Guardia to Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt, Langston Hughes to Joe Louis, to Robert Moses and Joe DiMaggio. In VICTORY CITY, John Strausbaugh returns to tell the story of New York City's war years with the same richness, depth, and nuance he brought to his previous books, City of Sedition and The Village, providing readers with a groundbreaking new look into the greatest city on earth during the most transformative -- and costliest -- war in human history.

Viva la Revolucion

By Eric Hobsbawm
Authors:
Eric Hobsbawm
Eric Hobsbawm (1917-2012) wrote that Latin America was the only region of the world outside Europe which he felt he knew well and where he felt entirely at home. He claimed this was because it was the only part of the Third World whose two principal languages, Spanish and Portuguese, were within his reach. But he was also, of course, attracted by the potential for social revolution in Latin America. After the triumph of Fidel Castro in Cuba in January 1959, and even more after the defeat of the American attempt to overthrow him at the Bay of Pigs in April 1961, 'there was not an intellectual in Europe or the USA', he wrote, 'who was not under the spell of Latin America, a continent apparently bubbling with the lava of social revolutions'.'The Third World brought the hope of revolution back to the First in the 1960s'. The two great international inspirations were Cuba and Vietnam, 'triumphs not only of revolution, but of Davids against Goliaths, of the weak against the all-powerful'.
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Viceroys

By Christopher Lee
Authors:
Christopher Lee
Between 1858 and 1947, twenty British men ruled millions of some of the most remarkable people of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.From the Indian Mutiny to the cruel religious partition of India and the newly formed and named Pakistan, the Viceroy had absolute power, more than the monarch who had sent him. Selected from that exclusive class of English, Scottish and Irish breeding, the aristocracy, the Viceroys were plumed, rode elephants, shot tigers. Even their wives stood when they entered the room. Nevertheless, many of them gave everything for India. The first Viceroy, Canning, exhausted by the Mutiny, buried his wife in Calcutta before he left the subcontinent to die shortly afterwards.The average Viceroy lasted five years and was granted an earldom but rarely a sense of triumph. Did these Viceroys behave as badly as twenty-first century moralists would have us believe? When the Raj was over, the legacy of Empire continued, as the new rulers slipped easily into the offices and styles of the British who had gone. Being 'British' was now a caste.Viceroys is the tale of the British Raj, the last fling of British aristocracy. It is the supreme view of the British in India, portraying the sort of people who went out and the sort of people they were on their return. It is the story of utter power and what men did with it. Moreover, it is also the story of how modern British identity was established and in part the answer to how it was that such a small offshore European island people believed themselves to have the right to sit at the highest institutional tables and judge what was right and unacceptable in other nations and institutions.
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Vendetta

By James Neff
Authors:
James Neff
From 1957 to 1964, Robert Kennedy and Jimmy Hoffa channeled nearly all of their considerable powers into destroying each other. Kennedy's battle with Hoffa burst into the public consciousness with the 1957 Senate Rackets Committee hearings and intensified when his brother named him attorney general. RFK put together a "Get Hoffa" squad within the Justice Department, devoted to destroying one man. But Hoffa, with nearly unlimited Teamster funds, was not about to roll over. Drawing upon a treasure trove of previously secret and undisclosed documents, James Neff has crafted a brilliant, heart-pounding epic of crime and punishment.

Voices From the Napoleonic Wars

By Jon E. Lewis
Authors:
Jon E. Lewis
Voices from the Napoleonic Wars reveals in telling detail the harsh lives of soldiers at the turn of the eighteenth century and in the early years of the nineteenth - the poor food and brutal discipline they endured, along with the forced marches and bloody, hand-to-hand combat. Contemporaries were mesmerised by Napoleon, and with good reason: in 1812, he had an unprecedented million men and more under arms. His new model army of volunteers and conscripts at epic battles such as Austerlitz, Salamanca, Borodino, Jena and, of course, Waterloo marked the beginning of modern warfare, the road to the Sommes and Stalingrad. The citizen-in-arms of Napoleon's Grande Armée and other armies of the time gave rise to a distinct body of soldiers' personal memoirs. The personal accounts that Jon E. Lewis has selected from these memoirs, as well as from letters and diaries, include those of Rifleman Harris fighting in the Peninsular Wars, and Captain Alexander Cavalie Mercer of the Royal Horse Artillery at Waterloo. They cover the land campaigns of the French Revolutionary Wars (1739-1802), the Napoleonic Wars (1803-1815) and the War of 1812 (1812-1815), in North America. This was the age of cavalry charges, of horse-drawn artillery, of muskets and hand-to-hand combat with sabres and bayonets. It was an era in which inspirational leadership and patriotic common cause counted for much at close quarters on chaotic and bloody battlefields. The men who wrote these accounts were directly involved in the sweeping campaigns and climactic battles that set Europe and America alight at the turn of the eighteenth century and in the years that followed. Alongside recollections of the ferocity of hard-fought battles are the equally telling details of the common soldier's daily life - short rations, forced marches in the searing heat of the Iberian summer and the bitter cold of the Russian winter, debilitating illnesses and crippling wounds, looting and the lash, but also the compensations of hard-won comradeship in the face of ever-present death. Collectively, these personal accounts give us the most vivid picture of warfare 200 and more years ago, in the evocative language of those who knew it at first hand - the men and officers of the British, French and American armies. They let us know exactly what it was like to be an infantryman, a cavalryman, an artilleryman of the time.
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Voices from D-Day

By Jon E. Lewis
Authors:
Jon E. Lewis
The extraordinary and compelling story of the 6th of June, 1944, and the Battle for Normandy is told here through first-hand testimonies from civilians and soldiers on both sides. It features classic accounts by soldiers such as Rommel and Bradley, together with frontline reports by some of the world's finest authors and war correspondents, including Ernest Hemingway and Alan Melville. Highlights of this unique collection include the break-out from Omaha beach as told by the GI who led it, a French housewife's story of what it was like to wake up to the invasion, German soldiers' accounts of finding themselves facing the biggest seaborne invasion in history, a view from the command post by a member of Eisenhower's staff, combat reports, diaries and letters of British veterans of all forces and services, and accounts of the follow-up battle for Normandy, one of the bloodiest struggles of the war.
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  • Voices from the Holocaust

    By Jon E. Lewis
    Authors:
    Jon E. Lewis
    The testament to a tragedy.Voices from The Holocaust follows the whole history of the 'Shoah' from Hitler's rise to power to the Nuremburg trials, but of course the exterminations and death camps of 'The Final Solution' take centre stage. It tells the story from the perspective of the people who were there, and were witnesses - on both sides - of the horror. While some of the eye-witnesses are well-known, such as Anne Frank, Primo Levi and Heinrich Himmler, the book includes recollections of camp inmates, SS Totenkopf guards and the British soldiers who liberated Belsen. Shocking, powerful and personal, Voices from the Holocaust retells history, written by those who were there.
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    Voices from the Titanic

    By Geoff Tibballs
    Authors:
    Geoff Tibballs
    The graphic, first-hand story of the first voyage and disastrous sinking of RMS Titanic - told by the survivors themselves.The story of the sinking of the great liner, Titanic, has been told countless times since that fateful night on 14th April 1912 by historians, novelists and film producers alike, but no account is as graphic or revealing as those who were actually there. Through survivors' tales, and contemporary newspaper reports from both sides of the Atlantic, here are eye-witness accounts full of details that range from poignant to humorous, stage by stage from the Liner's glorious launch in Belfast to the sombre sea burial services of those who perished on her first and only voyage.In the book, the voices of the survivors record their own stories, as well as the official records, press reports and investigations into what went wrong that night.

    Victoria

    By Elizabeth Longford
    Authors:
    Elizabeth Longford
    Queen Victoria, a woman of diminutive stature and superabundant temperament, gave her name to something more than an age.Using unrestricted access to material from the Royal Archives, including previously unpublished passages Queen Victoria's celebrated Journals, Elizabeth Longford's classic account remains the definitive biography of this extraordinary woman. She shows the queen tormented by an unhappy childhood; tantalised by an all-too-brief happy marriage; deeply shocked at the Prince Consort's death. She depicts the gradual emergence of the queen's renowned qualities, together with some surprising traits, presenting her in a fresh, affectionate and thoroughly human light.'Dazzlingly readable, and very enjoyable' Stella Gibbons

    The Vertigo Years

    By Philipp Blom
    Authors:
    Philipp Blom
    Europe, 1900-1914: a world adrift, a pulsating era of creativity and contradictions. The major topics of the day: terrorism, globalization, immigration, consumerism, the collapse of moral values, and the rivalry of superpowers. The twentieth century was not born in the trenches of the Somme or Passchendaele,but rather in the fifteen vertiginous years preceding World War I. In this short span of time, a new world order was emerging in ultimately tragic contradiction to the old. These were the years in which the political and personal repercussions of the Industrial Revolution were felt worldwide: Cities grew like never before as people fled the countryside and their traditional identities science created new possibilities as well as nightmares education changed the outlook of millions of people mass-produced items transformed daily life industrial labourers demanded a share of political power and women sought to change their place in society,as well as the very fabric of sexual relations. From the tremendous hope for a new century embodied in the 1900 World's Fair in Paris to the shattering assassination of a Habsburg archduke in Sarajevo in 1914, historian Philipp Blom chronicles this extraordinary epoch year by year. Prime Ministers and peasants, anarchists and actresses, scientists and psychopaths intermingle on the stage of a new century in this portrait of an opulent, unstable age on the brink of disaster. Beautifully written and replete with deftly told anecdotes, The Vertigo Years brings the wonders, horrors, and fears of the early twentieth century vividly to life.

    Voices Of War

    By Michael Caulfield
    Authors:
    Michael Caulfield
    Drawn from engagements ranging from World War I through to operations in East Timor and Iraq, the stories are taken from the Australians at War Film Archive, a collection of the memories of over two thousand Australians who have served, both on the front line and at home. Some are unbelievably, unbearably tragic, even after sixty or seventy years, others are the golden memories of happy, albeit unusual, times. And, more often than not, they are stories which have never been shared with others, even family members. There are stories from winners of the Victoria Cross; stories from the POW camps of Asia and Europe; from the patrols of Vietnam, through to those who served as peacekeepers in Rwanda and Somalia. There are stories from nurses, from those who have volunteered to serve with aid agencies. They are stories of ordinary Australians caught up by circumstances and by duty, in wartime. Here are their words.
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    Voices from the Grave

    By Ed Moloney
    Authors:
    Ed Moloney
    The dawning of peace in Northern Ireland has not brought with it much truth about what happened during'the long war'. Very few of the paramilitary leaders on either side have ever spoken candidly about their role in that bloody conflict. But here, in a dramatic break with the unwritten laws of paramilitary omertà, two leading figures from opposing sides reveal their involvement in bombings, shootings and killings and speak frankly about how differently their wars came to an end. Brendan Hughes was a legend in the Republican movement. An'operator', a gun-runner and mastermind of some of the most savage IRA violence of the Troubles, he was a friend and close ally of Gerry Adams and was by his side during the most brutal years of the conflict. David Ervine was the most substantial political figure to emerge from the world of Loyalist paramilitaries. A former Ulster Volunteer Force bomber and confidante of its long-time leader Gusty Spence, Ervine helped steer Loyalism's gunmen towards peace, persuading the UVF's leaders to target IRA and Sinn Fein activists and push them down the road to a ceasefire. In extensive interviews given to researchers from Boston College on condition that their stories be kept secret until after their deaths, these men spoke with astonishing openness about their turbulent, violent lives. Now their stories have been woven into a vivid narrative which provides compelling insight into a secret world and events long hidden from history. Voices from the Grave is the inaugural publication. of the Boston College IRA/UVF Oral History Project of which Professor Thomas E. Hachey and Dr Robert O'Neill are the General Editors.

    The Vietnam Years

    By Michael Caulfield
    Authors:
    Michael Caulfield
    The Vietnam War was the longest and most divisive war in Australian history. Between 1962 and 1972, 59 000 Australian men and women served there; 520 were killed and over 2 500 wounded. Many of the veterans still bear the scars - physically and mentally. This is the story of the Vietnam War but it is not in any way a chronological military history. A patrol on the last day was the same as a patrol on the first day. What hasn't been told so far is what really happened on patrols: how men fought, died and came back damaged in some way. It ranges from a superb and moving account of the Battle of Long Tan to the effect of a war where a man could come off a patrol in the morning - and that evening be back in Australia, discharged from the army, and drunk in the Bourbon and Beefsteak. We hear these men speak and tell of what it was really like. The Vietnam Years also tells the story of those who stayed at home - the Army wives who had to cope then and now and the wave of political protest at home that was such a part of this turbulent era.
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    Valkyrie

    By Hans Bernd Gisevius
    Authors:
    Hans Bernd Gisevius
    When on July 20, 1944, a bomb,boldly placed inside Hitler's headquarters by Colonel Count Claus von Stauffenberg, exploded without killing the Führer, the subsequent coup d'état against the Third Reich collapsed. The conspirators were summarily shot or condemned in show trials and sadistically hanged. One of the few survivors of the conspiracy was Hans Bernd Gisevius, who had used his positions in the Gestapo and the Abwehr (military intelligence) to further the anti-Nazi plot. Valkyrie , an abridgment of Gisevius's classic insider's account To the Bitter End , is an intimate memoir as riveting as it is exceptional.

    Vietnam, Now

    By David Lamb
    Authors:
    David Lamb
    When he left war-ravaged Vietnam some thirty years ago, journalist David Lamb averred "I didn't care if I ever saw the wretched country again." But in 1997, he found himself living in Hanoi, in charge of the Los Angeles Times's first peacetime bureau and in the midst of a country on the move, as it progresses toward a free-market economy and divorces itself from the restrictive, isolationist policies established at the end of the war. This was a new country in Vietnam, Now , David Lamb brings it- and us- forward from its dark, distant past. From the myriad personalities entwined in the dark, distant history of the war to those focused toward the future, Lamb reveals a rich and culturally diverse people as they share their memories of the country's past, and their hopes for a peacetime future. A portrait of a beautiful country and a remarkable, determined people, Vietnam, Now is a personal journey that will change the way we think of Vietnam, and perhaps the war as well.

    Vicksburg Campaign

    By David G. Martin
    Authors:
    David G. Martin
    "Sam" Grant had his faults, but he was always willing to fight, and often able to win. Frustrated by a tactical stalemate in Virginia in 1863 Ulysses S. Grant embarked upon a strategy of strangling the Confederate supply line on the Mississippi. Central to the Union strategy was the capture of the Confederate-held Mississippi town of Vicksburg.Grant combined the coolness under fire necessary for operational command with a storekeeper's ability to figure odds, anticipate supply needs, and calculate rates of movement of his own and his opponent's armies. Facing him was a determined and talented Confederate opposition. Nathan Bedford Forrest's campaign of protracted cavalry raids frequently placed Grant's supplies and reinforcements in constant jeopardy. Isaac Brown and his scratch-built Confederate ironclad Arkansas took on the Union river fleet single-handedly, writing one of the most interesting chapters in American naval history. Inside the besieged Vicksburg itself, Southern soldiers and civilians alike suffered from hunger and bombardment. Grant's soldiers endured in their turn heat, disease, and costly attacks on the Confederate fortifications.Grant's Vicksburg operations and the experiences of the opposing sides are of lasting historical interest. Day-to-day courage in pursuit of a grand strategic vision combined land and naval operations, guerrilla raids, political infighting and interference, and the riverine operations of America's first "brown water" navy all have been brought together here in a powerful narrative of military history.

    The Vanished Kingdom

    By James Charles Roy
    Authors:
    James Charles Roy
    Twice in this century, Germany initiated wars of unimagined terror and destruction. In both cases, defence of the Prussian" realm, the German homeland, was the perceived and vilified perpetrator. Few today understand with any precision what Prussia" means, either geographically or nationalistically, but neither would they deny the psychic resonance of the single word. To most, it means unbridled aggression, the image of the goose-stepping Junker .But what was once Prussia is now a significant portion of Eastern Europe, a contested homeland first won by Christian knights of the Teutonic Order. For centuries thereafter its terrain has been crisscrossed by war and partitioned by barbed wire. In its final catastrophe of 1945, nearly two million German refugees fled the region as Russian armies broke the eastern front, perhaps the greatest dislocation of a civilian population at any time during World War II. With the Berlin Wall now a memory and the Soviet Union in a state of collapse, this remains a geography in shambles. Modern travellers can now, for the first time in decades, see and ponder for themselves what Prussia really was and now is.James Charles Roy and Amos Elon, two writers noted for their inquisitive natures, have gone to search through the rubble themselves. They intermingle present-day observations with moving vignettes from the German and Prussian past, sketching a portrait of the Europe we know today. The story is spiced with interviews and reminiscences, unforgettable in their sadness, of people looking back at a life now gone, a life full of turmoil and heartache, memories both fond and tragic. The final result: a far deeper understanding of the tattered lands of today's Eastern Europe.

    The Virago Book of Women and the Great War

    By Joyce Marlow
    Authors:
    Joyce Marlow
    Joyce Marlow presents a fascinating and varied collection of women's writing on the Great War drawn from diaries, newspapers, letters and memoirs from across Europe and the States. Starting with material from 1914, she outlines the pre-war campaigns for suffrage and then the demand from women eager to be counted amongst those in action. Contemporary accounts and reports describe their experience on the field and reactions to women in completely new areas, such as surgery as well as on the home front. The words of women in the UK, America, France and Germany display a side to the war rarely seen. Familiar voices such as those of Vera Brittain, Millicent Fawcett, May Sinclair, Alexandra Kollontai, the Pankhurst family and Beatrice Webb, as well as the unknown, make this anthology a truly indispensable guide to the female experience of a war after which women's lives would never be the same.

    The Virginia Campaign, 1864 And 1865

    By General Andrew A. Humphreys
    Authors:
    General Andrew A. Humphreys
    Most people still view the final, bloody confrontation between Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee as a relentless grinding away of the Army of Northern Virginia in a continuous battle of attrition, attributing Grant's victory not to his generalship but to his overwhelming superiority in numbers. General Andrew A. Humphreys (1810-1883), chief of staff of the Army of the Potomac and later the fiery commander of the Second Corps, provides readers with a far more enlightened understanding in The Virginia Campaign, 1864 and 1865 . Humphreys was known for his high military scholarship, conspicuous courage, and remarkable coolness in combat. Joshua Chamberlain hailed him as "the accomplished, heroic soldier, the noble and modest man."In The Virginia Campaign, Humphreys examines the strategy, battles, and consequences from the detached perspective of a historian intimately acquainted with his material. Especially valuable is his clear dissection of alternative plans of campaign. For readers seeking concise accounts of, and insightful analyses into, the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania Court House, and Cold Harbor, the siege of Petersburg, the capture of Richmond, and the surrender of Lee's army, this volume in the landmark Campaigns of the Civil War series more than fulfills the requirements.

    Voices From The Third Reich

    By Dennis Showalter, Johannes Steinhoff, Peter Pechel
    Authors:
    Dennis Showalter, Johannes Steinhoff, Peter Pechel
    A major historical document, this book contains interviews with more than 150 Germans who witnessed, participated in, or resisted the rise of Adolph Hitler. The testimony comes from well-known figures like Manfred Rommel and Helmut Kohl former soldiers and ordinary civilians and victims of the criminal policies of the Nazi regime. Haunting and extraordinary tales of horror, courage, grim determination, and moral confusion fill these pages. Voices from the Third Reich takes the material of epic history and presents it in the form of the individual human experiences of men, women, and children subjected to the pressures of total war in a fascist state.
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