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Naples

By Desmond Seward
Authors:
Desmond Seward
Many Italian cities look back with pride to the days when they were independent republics: Naples, on the contrary, remembers its days as a royal capital, the brilliant administrative and political centre of The Kingdom of The Two Sicilies, ruled over successively by the house of Anjou, Aragon and Bourbon. Once 'the third city of Europe', today it is one of the least visited of the continent's great cities. The same bustling lively atmosphere and magnificent buildings that one finds in Paris or London exist here.This book is a topographical anthology which recreates for today's tourist the drama, the history and the life of a city in buildings and locations that still exist today. An indispensable companion, it brings the past of Naples vividly to life for the traveller of the present. Extracts from chronicles, memoirs, biographies, letters and novels refer to the most important and beautiful buildings in and around Naples, as well as the lives of travellers to and residents of this famous city.This is a guide to the vanished glories of royal Naples: the departure of the Borbone King Francis II in 1860 as the Risorgimento movement brought about unification of Italy. It records the turbulent and bloodstained days of the Angevin Queens Giovanna I and II, and the revolt led by the young fisherman Masaniello; the artistic life of the city that Petrarch knew, where Caravaggio, Ribera and Giordano painted, and which attracted such diverse visitors as Nelson and Lady Hamilton, Casanova, Goethe, Mozart, John Evelyn and Angelica Kauffman among countless others. The dazzling world of the royalty - their palaces overlooking the legendarily beautiful Bay of Naples, their court balls and ceremonies - is described as well as the pulsing, overcrowded slums of the Spanish quarter and the seafront with its tarantella-dancers, iced-melon vendors, pickpockets and throbbing Neopolitan songs.Naples is still, as it always has been, a city of challenging contrasts: sunlight and squalor, grandeur and decay, gaiety and despair. Its slums and its crime-rate have deterred many, but those who persist will discover, through this illuminating guide, the hidden glories of this famous city.
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No Milk Today

By Andrew Ward
Authors:
Andrew Ward
Traditionally, in British society, the milkman has been a family friend, a sex symbol and a cheerful chappie. He has been the eyes and ears of the community, and his genetic legacy has supposedly passed into the lineage of housewives.This collection of folk tales about milkmen covers the history of the job and the milkman's everyday experience. The book is structured by the milkman's working day. It starts with the alarm-clock and ends with the milkman returning home in search of sustenance and tender loving care. The book is less about changes in the dairy industry and more about the work experiences of the people who have delivered milk. Many milkmen are featured: Chris Frankland delivered over eight million pints before he retired at seventy-four; Alistair Maclean drove two million miles across the north coast of Scotland in fifty years; and Tony Fowler, an award-winning Leicestershire milkman, helped to put over fifty people in prison.For more than thirty years the author has collected milkman stories through oral testimony, newspaper archives, anecdotes, diaries, books and more formal interviews.Praise for the author:Barnsley: A Study in Football, 1953-59 (with Ian Alister, Crowberry 1981)'A rare example of folk history . . . a work thankfully free of sick parrots, bulging nets and exclusive revelations.' (The Yorkshire Post)'riveting, dreamy, passionate, valuable and stuff of a past era which must not be forgotten . . . I read it in an all-night session.' (Frank Keating, Guardian)
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The Nazi Titanic

By Robert P. Watson
Authors:
Robert P. Watson
Built in 1927, the German ocean liner SS Cap Arcona was the greatest ship since the RMS Titanic and one of the most celebrated luxury liners in the world. When the Nazis seized control in Germany, she was stripped down for use as a floating barracks and troop transport. Later, during the war, Hitler's minister, Joseph Goebbels, cast her as the "star" in his epic propaganda film about the sinking of the legendary Titanic.Following the film's enormous failure, the German navy used the Cap Arcona to transport German soldiers and civilians across the Baltic, away from the Red Army's advance. In the Third Reich's final days, the ill-fated ship was packed with thousands of concentration camp prisoners. Without adequate water, food, or sanitary facilities, the prisoners suffered as they waited for the end of the war. Just days before Germany surrendered, the Cap Arconawas mistakenly bombed by the British Royal Air Force, and nearly all of the prisoners were killed in the last major tragedy of the Holocaust and one of history's worst maritime disasters.Although the British government sealed many documents pertaining to the ship's sinking, Robert P. Watson has unearthed forgotten records, conducted many interviews, and used over 100 sources, including diaries and oral histories, to expose this story. As a result, The Nazi Titanic is a riveting and astonishing account of an enigmatic ship that played a devastating role in World War II and the Holocaust.
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The Naughty Nineties

By David Friend
Authors:
David Friend
THE NAUGHTY NINETIES: The Triumph of the American Libido examines the scandal-strafed age when our public and private lives began to blur due to the rise of the web, reality TV, and the wholesale tabloidization of pop culture. In this comprehensive and often hilarious time capsule, David Friend--an editor at Vanity Fair--combines detailed reporting with first-person accounts from many of the decade's signal personalities, from Anita Hill to Monica Lewinsky, Lorena Bobbitt to Heidi Fleiss, Alan Cumming to Joan Rivers, Jesse Jackson to key members of the Clinton, Dole, and Bush teams. THE NAUGHTY NINETIES also uncovers unsung sexual pioneers, from the enterprising sisters who dreamed up the Brazilian bikini wax to the scientists who, quite by accident, discovered Viagra--and dozens more.

Nicholas II, The Last Tsar

By Michael Paterson
Authors:
Michael Paterson
The character of the last Tsar, Nicholas II (1868-1918) is crucial to understanding the overthrow of tsarist Russia, the most significant event in Russian history. Nicholas became Tsar at the age of 26. Though a conscientious man who was passionate in his devotion to his country, he was weak, sentimental, dogmatic and indecisive. Ironically he could have made an effective constitutional monarch, but these flaws rendered him fatally unsuited to be the sole ruler of a nation that was in the throes of painful modernisation. That he failed is not surprising, for many abler monarchs could not have succeeded. Rather to be wondered at is that he managed, for 23 years, to hold on to power despite the overwhelming force of circumstances. Though Nicholas was exasperating, he had many endearing qualities. A modern audience, aware - as contemporaries were not - of the private pressures under which he lived, can empathise with him and forgive some of his errors of judgement. To some readers he seems a fool, to others a monster, but many are touched by the story of a well-meaning man doing his best under impossible conditions. He is, in other words, a biographical subject that engages readers whatever their viewpoint. His family was of great importance to Nicholas. He and his wife, Alexandra, married for love and retained this affection to the end of their lives. His four daughters, all different and intriguing personalities, were beautiful and charming. His son, the family's - and the nation's - hope for the future, was disabled by an illness that had to be concealed from Russia and from the world. It was this circumstance that made possible the nefarious influence of Rasputin, which in turn hastened the end of the dynasty.This story has everything: romance and tragedy, grandeur and misery, human frailty and an international catastrophe that would not only bring down the Tsar but put an end to the glittering era of European monarchies.
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The Nazi Doctors (Revised Edition)

By Robert Jay Lifton
Authors:
Robert Jay Lifton
In his most powerful and important book, renowned psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton presents a brilliant analysis of the crucial role that German doctors played in the Nazi genocide. Now updated with a new preface, The Nazi Doctors remains the definitive work on the Nazi medical atrocities, a chilling exposé of the banality of evil at its epitome, and a sobering reminder of the darkest side of human nature.

The New Book of Snobs

By D.J. Taylor
Authors:
D.J. Taylor
'Hugely enjoyable' AN Wilson, Sunday Times'Thoughtful, entertaining and enjoyable' Michael Gove, Book of the Week, The TimesInspired by William Makepeace Thackeray, the first great analyst of snobbery, and his trail-blazing The Book of Snobs (1848), D. J. Taylor brings us a field guide to the modern snob. Short of calling someone a racist or a paedophile, one of the worst charges you can lay at anybody's door in the early twenty-first century is to suggest that they happen to be a snob. But what constitutes snobbishness? Who are the snobs and where are they to be found? Are you a snob? Am I? What are the distinguishing marks? Snobbery is, in fact, one of the keys to contemporary British life, as vital to the backstreet family on benefits as the proprietor of the grandest stately home, and an essential element of their view of who of they are and what the world might be thought to owe them.The New Book of Snobs will take a marked interest in language, the vocabulary of snobbery - as exemplified in the 'U' and 'Non U' controversy of the 1950s - being a particular field in which the phenomenon consistently makes its presence felt, and alternate social analysis with sketches of groups and individuals on the Thackerayan principle. Prepare to meet the Political Snob, the City Snob, the Technology Snob, the Property Snob, the Rural Snob, the Literary Snob, the Working-class Snob, the Sporting Snob, the Popular Cultural Snob and the Food Snob.
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The New York Times Book Of The Dead

By William McDonald
Authors:
William McDonald
The obituary page is the section many readers first turn to not only see who died, but to read some of the most inspiring, insightful, often funny, and elegantly written stories celebrating the lives of the men and women who have influenced on our world. This book, for the first time, chronicles the lives of these history-makers from the past 160 years through the obits page of The New York Times, one of the most talked about and lingered over sections of the newspaper.Arranged into sections like People of Letters, Entertainers and Performers, Politicians and Leaders, and the Infamous, the selected obituaries, hand-picked by obituaries editor, Bill McDonald, include fascinating lives from recent history -- from FDR to Winston Churchill, Marilyn Monroe to Robin Williams, Albert Einstein to Robert Oppenheimer, Princess Grace to Lady Di, Al Capone to John Gotti, and more than 300 more including some lesser-known but remarkable people who's compelling lives and inventions have impacted the world.Also included is a web-key which allows instant access to an exclusive website featuring 10,000 selected obituaries which are easily searchable by name, theme, dates, and more.Designed with 150 black-and-white photographs, this tomb-sized book plus website package is the perfect gift.

The New York Times Complete World War II

By Richard Overy, The New York Times, Tom Brokaw
Authors:
Richard Overy, The New York Times, Tom Brokaw
The Times' complete coverage of World War II is now available in a paperback edition of this unique book. Hundreds of the most riveting articles from the archives of the Times including firsthand accounts of major events and little-known anecdotes have been selected for inclusion in The New York Times: World War II. The book covers the biggest battles of the war, from the Battle of the Bulge to the Battle of Iwo Jima, as well as moving stories from the home front and profiles of noted leaders and heroes such as Winston Churchill and George Patton.The book features more than 600 articles hand selected by respected World War II historian and writer, editor Richard Overy guides readers through the articles, putting the events into historical context. The enclosed DVD-ROM includes every article published by the Times during the war--nearly 100,000--which is fully searchable and easy to navigate.Beautifully designed and illustrated with hundreds of maps and historical photographs, this book and DVD-ROM package is the perfect gift for any war, politics, or history buff.
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Night Raid

By Taylor Downing
Authors:
Taylor Downing
The loss of British bombers over Occupied Europe began to reach alarming levels in 1941. Could it be that the Germans were using a sophisticated form of radar to direct their night fighters and anti-aircraft guns at the British bombers? British aerial reconnaissance discovered what seemed to be a rotating radar tower on a clifftop at Bruneval, near Le Havre. The truth must be revealed. The decision was taken to launch a daring raid on the Bruneval site to try and capture the technology for further examination. The planned airborne assault would be extremely risky. The parachute regiment had only been formed a year before on Churchill's insistence. This night raid would test the men to the extreme limits of their abilities. Night Raid tells the gripping tale of this mission from the planning stages, to the failed rehearsals when the odds seemed stacked against them, to the night of the raid itself, and the scientific secrets that were discovered thanks to the paras' precious cargo - the German radar. Its capture was of immense importance in the next stages of the war and the mission itself marked the birth of the legend of the 'Red Devils'.
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No End Save Victory

By David Kaiser
Authors:
David Kaiser
While Franklin Delano Roosevelt's first hundred days may be the most celebrated period of his presidency, the months before the attack on Pearl Harbor proved the most critical. Beginning as early as 1939 when Germany first attacked Poland, Roosevelt skillfully navigated a host of challenges,a reluctant population, an unprepared military, and disagreements within his cabinet,to prepare the country for its inevitable confrontation with the Axis. In No End Save Victory , esteemed historian David Kaiser draws on extensive archival research to reveal the careful preparations that enabled the United States to win World War II. Alarmed by Germany and Japan's aggressive militarism, Roosevelt understood that the United States would almost certainly be drawn into the conflict raging in Europe and Asia. However, the American populace, still traumatized by memories of the First World War, was reluctant to intervene in European and Asian affairs. Even more serious was the deplorable state of the American military. In September of 1940, Roosevelt's military advisors told him that the US would not have the arms, ammunition, or men necessary to undertake any major military operation overseas,let alone win such a fight,until April of 1942. Aided by his closest military and civilian collabourators, Roosevelt pushed a series of military expansions through Congress that nearly doubled the size of the US Navy and Army, and increased production of the arms, tanks, bombers, and warships that would allow America to prevail in the coming fight.Highlighting Roosevelt's deft management of the strong personalities within his cabinet and his able navigation of the shifting tides of war, No End Save Victory is the definitive account of America's preparations for and entry into World War II. As Kaiser shows, it was Roosevelt's masterful leadership and prescience that prepared the reluctant nation to fight,and gave it the tools to win.

The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong

By Anne F Thurston, Gyalo Thondup
Authors:
Anne F Thurston, Gyalo Thondup
Shortly before midnight on March 17, 1959, the Dalai Lama, without his glasses and dressed as an ordinary Tibetan solider, slipped out of his summer residence with only four aides at his side. At that moment, he became the symbolic head of the Tibetan government in exile, and Gyalo Thondup, the only one of the Dalai Lama's brothers not to don the robes of a Buddhist monk, became the fulcrum for the independence movement. The Noodle Maker of Kalimpong tells the extraordinary story of the Dalai Lama's family, the exile of the spiritual leader of Tibetan Buddhism from Tibet, and the enduring political crisis that has seen remote and bleakly beautiful Tibet all but disappear as an independent nation-state.For the last sixty years, Gyalo Thondup has been at the at the heart of the epic struggle to protect and advance Tibet in the face of unreliable allies, overwhelming odds, and devious rivals, playing an utterly determined and unique role in a Cold War high-altitude superpower rivalry. Here, for the first time, he reveals how he found himself whisked between Chiang Kai-shek, Zhou Enlai, Jawaharlal Nehru, and the CIA, as he tried to secure, on behalf of his brother, the future of Tibet.

The Nazi and the Psychiatrist

By Jack El-Hai
Authors:
Jack El-Hai
In 1945, after his capture at the end of the Second World War, Hermann Göring arrived at an American-run detention centre in war-torn Luxembourg, accompanied by sixteen suitcases and a red hatbox. The suitcases contained all manner of paraphernalia: medals, gems, two cigar cutters, silk underwear, a hot water bottle, and the equivalent of 1 million in cash. Hidden in a coffee can, a set of brass vials housed glass capsules containing a clear liquid and a white precipitate: potassium cyanide. Joining Göring in the detention centre were the elite of the captured Nazi regime,Grand Admiral Dönitz armed forces commander Wilhelm Keitel and his deputy Alfred Jodl the mentally unstable Robert Ley the suicidal Hans Frank the pornographic propagandist Julius Streicher,fifty-two senior Nazis in all, of whom the dominant figure was Göring.To ensure that the villainous captives were fit for trial at Nuremberg, the US army sent an ambitious army psychiatrist, Captain Douglas M. Kelley, to supervise their mental well-being during their detention. Kelley realized he was being offered the professional opportunity of a lifetime: to discover a distinguishing trait among these arch-criminals that would mark them as psychologically different from the rest of humanity. So began a remarkable relationship between Kelley and his captors, told here for the first time with unique access to Kelley's long-hidden papers and medical records.Kelley's was a hazardous quest, dangerous because against all his expectations he began to appreciate and understand some of the Nazi captives, none more so than the former Reichsmarshall, Hermann Göring. Evil had its charms.

The New York Times The Times Of The Sixties

By John Rockwell, The New York Times
Authors:
John Rockwell, The New York Times
There is no better record of events than The New York Times, and now The Times of the Sixties captures the history, culture, and personalities of the decade through hundreds of articles and original commentary in this unique and fascinating book.Whether we lived through them or learned of them after the fact, the events of the 1960s? the beginning of the Vietnam War, the moon landing, the hippie movement, to name just a few?resonate strongly in our culture today.The Times of the Sixties represents one of the most fascinating, extensive, and well-rounded portraits of one of modern history's most tumultuous decades. More than 400 articles have been culled from the archives of The New York Times and brilliantly curated by staff writer John Rockwell.Articles feature coverage of historic events like the Cuban missile crisis, Martin Luther King's I Have A Dream speech, the assassination of President Kennedy; cultural highlights such as the British Invasion, movie reviews of Psycho, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and The Graduate, and features on music groups like the Supremes; plus pieces on pivotal political figures like John F. Kennedy, Mao Zedong, and Che Guevara, as well as influential personalities such as Muhammad Ali, Marilyn Monroe, and Betty Friedan.Rockwell guides readers through the articles he's selected, putting the events into historical context and exploring the far-reaching impact of these events and individuals. The book also includes hundreds of black-and-white and color photographs from the Times and other sources.Also available: The New York Times: The Times of the Seventies (978-1-57912-945-3) and The New York Times: The Times of the Eighties (978-1-57912-933-0).

The Noir Forties

By Richard Lingeman
Authors:
Richard Lingeman
Richard Lingeman vividly recreates the momentous years between VJ Day in 1945 and the beginning of the Korean War in 1950,America's postwar period, the age of anxiety" characterized by the onset of the Red Scare and a nascent resistance to the growing Cold War consensus.The psychological hangover of World War II merged with burgeoning anti-communist paranoia and created a dark mood, a postwar noir" phenomenon. The Noir Forties saw the arrival of McCarthyism and a bleak distortion of American political culture. Lingeman traces the attitudes, hopes and fears, prejudices, and collective dreams and nightmares of the times, as reflected in the media, popular culture, political movements, opinion polls, and psychological studies.Richard Lingeman has created a memorable portrait of what the American people lived, dreamed, and thought during the period that became the crucible in which the destiny of the next forty years was settled.

New York Times The Times Of The Seventies

By Clyde Haberman, The New York Times
Authors:
Clyde Haberman, The New York Times
There is no better record of events then The New York Times, and now, The Times of the Seventies captures the history, culture, and personalities of the decade through hundreds of hand-selected articles and compelling original commentary in this unique and fascinating book.The New York Times: The Times of the Seventies is a brilliant time capsule containing all of the greatest, most important, and most memorable moments and events from the decade. Organized by sections such as national news, business, science & health, sports, arts & entertainment, life & style, the articles include coverage of historic events like the Watergate scandal, the end of the Vietnam War, the 1973 oil crisis, and the Iranian Revolution of 1979; cultural highlights like the break-up of the Beatles, the rise of disco, reviews of movies like Star Wars, The Godfather, Jaws, and Saturday Night Fever, and features on musicians like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, the Bee Gees, and Patti Smith; plus pieces on influential personalities such as Gloria Steinem, Bobby Fischer, and Farrah Fawcett and pivotal political figures like Richard Nixon, Pol Pot, and Augusto Pinochet.The stories are written by the great Times writers, including Murray Schumach, Nan Robertson, Craig Claiborne, Mimi Sheraton, Meyer Berger, R.W. Apple, Jr., John Rockwell, Clive Barnes, and John Russell. Editor Clyde Haberman has selected each and every article and guides readers through the stories, putting the events into historical context and exploring the impact these events and individuals eventually had on the future. Also included are hundreds of color photographs from the Times and other sources.Also available from Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers is The New York Times: The Times of the Eighties (978-1-57912-933-0)

New York Times: The Times Of The Eighties

By The New York Times, William Grimes
Authors:
The New York Times, William Grimes
From our nation's best source of in-depth daily reporting comes this sweeping retrospective of the news, culture, and personalities of the decade of the 1980s, as told through hundreds of handselected articles and compelling original commentary in this unique and fascinating book.There is no better record of history than the archives of The New York Times. Now, more than 200 articles from the great decade of the 1980s are culled from these archives and carefully curated, by editor and Times writer William Grimes, to create one complete, compelling, historical and nostalgic collection.Organized by sections such as politics, business, science & health, sports, arts & entertainment, food, obituaries, and more, The Times of the Eighties covers the biggest stories that shaped the 1980s. Articles include coverage of historic events like Wall Street's 'Black Monday,' the Iran-Contra scandal, Tiananmen Square, the Challenger disaster, the Human Genome Project, the collapse of communism, and the introduction of the personal computer by IBM; cultural highlights like the launch of MTV, Ted Turner's establishment of CNN, the Cabbage Patch doll craze, reviews of movies like E.T., Terminator, Raging Bull, and Tootsie, and features on musicians like Michael Jackson, Joan Jett, U2, Wham, Blondie, and more; plus pieces on personalities like Mikhail Gorbachev, Princess Diana, Ronald Reagan, Margaret Thatcher, Pete Rose, Bill Cosby, and more.The stories are penned by well-known Times writers like William Safire, Frank Rich, Anna Quindlen, Serge Schmemann, Russell Baker, Nan C. Robertson, Thomas L. Friedman, Linda Greenhouse, Bill Keller, Clyde Haberman, Paul Goldberger, Francis X. Clines, John Noble Wilford, Nicholas Kristof, Fox Butterfield, John Rockwell, Anthony Lewis, and many more.Grimes guides readers through the articles he's selected with commentary that puts the stories into historical context and explores the impact that these events and individuals eventually had on the future.Hundreds of color photographs from the Times and other sources illuminate the stories throughout.

National Service

By Colin Shindler
Authors:
Colin Shindler
Permission to speak, Sah!In the aftermath of the Second World War, over two million men were conscripted to serve in Britain's armed services. Some were sent abroad and watched their friends die in combat. Others remained in barracks and painted coal white. But despite delivering such varied experiences, National Service helped to shape the outlook of an entire generation of young British males.Historian Dr Colin Shindler has interviewed a wide range of ex-conscripts, from all backgrounds, across all ranks, and spanning the entire fourteen years that peacetime conscription lasted, and captured their memories in this engrossing book. From them, we experience the tension of a postwar Berlin surrounded by Russians, the exotic heat and colour of Tripoli in 1948, the brief but intense flashpoint of the Suez Crisis, and the fear of the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya. But we also hear about the other end of the scale, the conscripts who didn't make it outside the confines of their barracks, or in one case, beyond his home town.Through these conversations we learn as much about the changing attitudes of servicemen as war became more of a distant memory as we do about the varied nature of their experiences. We see, too, the changing face of British society across these pivotal years, which span everything from the coronation of Elizabeth II, to the birth of rock 'n' roll, to the beginning of the end of the Empire. The stories within these pages are fascinating. And they deserve to be told before they are lost forever.
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New York Times: Disunion

By Clay Risen, George Kalogerakis, Ted Widmer, The New York Times
Authors:
Clay Risen, George Kalogerakis, Ted Widmer, The New York Times
A major new collection of modern commentary? from scholars, historians, and Civil War buffs?on the significant events of the Civil War, culled from The New York Times' popular Disunion on-line journal Since its debut on November 6, 2010, Disunion, The New York Times' acclaimed journal about the Civil War, has published hundreds of original articles and won multiple awards, including 'Best History Website' from the New Media Institute and the History News Network. Following the chronology of the secession crisis and the Civil War, the contributors to Disunion, who include modern scholars, journalists, historians, and Civil War buffs, offer ongoing daily commentary and assessment of the Civil War as it unfolded.Now, for the first time, this fascinating and historically significant commentary has been gathered together and organized in one volume. In The New York Times: Disunion, historian Ted Widmer, has selected more than 100 articles that cover events beginning with Lincoln's presidential victory through the Emancipation Proclamation. Topics include everything from Walt Whitman's wartime diary to the bloody guerrilla campaigns in Missouri and Kansas. Esteemed contributors include William Freehling, Adam Goodheart, and Edward Ayers, among others.The book also compiles new essays that have not been published on the Disunion site by contributors and well-known historians such as David Blight, Gary Gallagher, and Drew Gilpin Faust. Topics include the perspective of African-American slaves and freed men on the war, the secession crisis in the Upper South, the war in the West (that is, past the Appalachians), the war in Texas, the international context, and Civil War?era cartography. Portraits, contemporary etchings, and detailed maps round out the book.

New York at War

By Steven H. Jaffe
Authors:
Steven H. Jaffe
the need to try. Stretching from the colonial era to 9/11 and beyond, New York at War is that most rare of books: a work of history that is at once local and international, timely and timeless. Bringing a unique lens to bear on the world's most celebrated and contested city, Jaffe reveals the unimaginable ways the city has changed,and how it has stubbornly endured,under threats both external and internal.