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1-2-3, You Love Me

By Jill Howarth
Authors:
Jill Howarth
From one bear hug to twelve pretty red roses, 1-2-3, You Love Me will foster lots of hugs, kisses, and affection between parent and child while teaching young ones to count from one to twelve. With charming love-filled illustrations, sturdy pages, and clever rhyming text, this is the perfect gift for baby for Valentine's Day or any time of year. Sipping on yummy shakes, cuddling puppies, counting the colors in a rainbow, and making music with friends are all ways that children can express their love for their friends and family with Jill Howarth's delightful new board book.

10 Little Kisses

By Taylor Garland
Authors:
Taylor Garland
This Valentine's Day, everyone from puppies to polar bears is saying "I love you!" Share hugs and kisses--and an easy counting lesson--with baby in this sing-along board book full of sweet animal photography.

The 12 Days of Christmas

By Jill Howarth
Authors:
Jill Howarth
Share the joy of the holiday season with the classic Christmas carol, "The Twelve Days of Christmas." Readers will sing along with adorable woodland animals as they recount all the extravagant gifts they've received each day from their true loves.Featuring fun, retro-inspired illustrations on thick, sturdy pages, The 12 Days of Christmas is a must-have to complete any Christmas celebration year after year!

46 Pages

By Scott Liell
Authors:
Scott Liell
Thomas Paine, a native of Thetford, England, arrived in America's colonies with little in the way of money, reputation, or prospects, though he did have a letter of recommendation in his pocket from Benjamin Franklin. Paine also had a passion for liberty in all its forms, and an abiding hatred of tyranny. His forceful, direct expression of those principles found voice in a pamphlet he wrote entitled Common Sense , which proved to be the most influential political work of the time. Ultimately, Paine's treatise provided inspiration to the second Continental Congress for the drafting of the Declaration of Independence. 46 Pages is a dramatic look at a pivotal moment in our country's formation, a scholar's meticulous recreation of the turbulent years leading up to the Revolutionary War, retold with excitement and new insight.

50 People Who Buggered Up Britain

By Quentin Letts
Authors:
Quentin Letts
Which fifty people made Britain the wreck she is? From ludicrous propagandist Alastair Campbell to the Luftwaffe's allies, the modernist architects, it's time to name the guilty.Quentin Letts sharpens his nib and stabs them where they deserve it, from TV gardener Alan Titchmarsh, the dumbed-down buffoon who put the 'h' in Aspidistra, to the perpetrators of the 'Credit Crunch'. Margaret Thatcher ruptured our national unity. The creators of EastEnders trashed our brand over high tea. Thus, he argues, are the people who made our country the ugly, scheming, cheating, beer-ridden bum of the Western world. Here are the fools and knaves and vulgarians who ripped down our British glories and imposed the tawdry and the trite. In a half century we have gone from end-of-Empire to descent-into-Hell.
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Accel World, Vol. 1 (Novel)

By Reki Kawahara
Authors:
Reki Kawahara
Even in the future, all the advances and innovation in the world can't change the dynamics of the school playground. And for Haruyuki Arita, a fat kid in junior high, that means he's destined to always be at the bottom of the food chain, prime pickings for the school bullies. But when he encounters the beautiful Kuroyukihime, an avatar in the virtual world where he relaxes, Haruyuki's life is turned on its head as he dives into Brain Burst, a mysterious computer program, and the Accelerated World with her help. And it's in the Accel World that Haruyuki casts off his depressing reality and takes hold of the chance to become a Burst Linker, a knight to protect his princess!

Accel World, Vol. 2 (Novel)

By Reki Kawahara
Authors:
Reki Kawahara
Even in the future, all the advances and innovation in the world can't change the dynamics of the school playground. And for Haruyuki Arita, a fat kid in junior high, that means he's destined to always be at the bottom of the food chain, prime pickings for the school bullies. But when he encounters the beautiful Kuroyukihime, an avatar in the virtual world where he relaxes, Haruyuki's life is turned on its head as he dives into Brain Burst, a mysterious computer program, and the Accelerated World with her help. And it's in the Accel World that Haruyuki casts off his depressing reality and takes hold of the chance to become a Burst Linker, a knight to protect his princess!

The Accidental Superpower

By Peter Zeihan
Authors:
Peter Zeihan
In the bestselling tradition of The World Is Flat and The Next 100 Years comes a contrarian and eye-opening assessment of American power.In THE ACCIDENTAL SUPERPOWER, international strategist Peter Zeihan examines how the hard rules of geography are eroding the American commitment to free trade; how much of the planet is aging into a mass retirement that will enervate capital supplies; and how it is the ever-ravenous American economy that is rapidly approaching energy independence. Combined, these factors are overturning the global system and ushering in a new (dis)order. For most, that is a disaster-in-waiting, but not for the Americans. The shale revolution allows Americans to sidestep a dangerous energy market. Only the U.S. boasts a youth population large enough to escape the sucking maw of global aging. Geography will matter more than ever in a de-globalizing world, and America's geography is simply sublime.
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Advance Australia...Where?

By Hugh Mackay
Authors:
Hugh Mackay
Sixteen years ago, Hugh Mackay wrote the bestseller Reinventing Australia that analysed, with forensic skill, what was happening to Australianr society. Now, in Advance Australia...Where? he takes another long, hard look at Australian society. While Australia enjoys unprecedented levels of prosperity and the promise of more to come, it is still battling an epidemic of depression, taking on record levels of debt, and yearning for a deeper sense of meaning. While many Australians complain about feeling powerless and isolated, Mackay sees some encouraging signs that Australians are learning how to absorb the impact of the revolutionary changes that have reshaped it.This is a book for anyone who cares about Australia, from the pen of Australia's most highly respected social researcher.

Advice to War Presidents

By Angelo Codevilla
Authors:
Angelo Codevilla
War presidents" are hardly exceptional in modern American history. To a greater or lesser extent, every president since Wilson has been a War President. Each has committed our country to the pursuit of peace, yet involved us in a seemingly endless series of wars,conflicts that the American foreign policy establishment has generally made worse. The chief reason, argues Angelo Codevilla in Advice to War Presidents , is that America's leaders have habitually imagined the world as they wished it to be rather than as it is: They acted under the assumptions that war is not a normal tool of statecraft but a curable disease, and that all the world's peoples wish to live as Americans do. As a result, our leaders have committed America to the grandest of ends while constantly subverting their own goals. Employing many negative examples from the Bush II administration but also ranging widely over the last century, Advice to War Presidents offers a primer on the unchanging principles of foreign policy. Codevilla explains the essentials,focusing on realities such as diplomacy, alliances, war, economic statecraft, intelligence, and prestige, rather than on meaningless phrases like international community," peacekeeping" and collective security." Not a realist, neoconservative, or a liberal internationalist, Codevilla follows an older tradition: that of historians like Thucydides, Herodotus, and Winston Churchill,writers who analyzed international affairs without imposing false categories. Advice to War Presidents is an effort to talk our future presidents down from their rhetorical highs and get them to practice statecraft rather than wishful thinking, lest they give us further violence.

The Affirmative Action Debate

By George Curry
Authors:
George Curry
The Affirmative Action Debate collects the leading voices on all sides of this crucial dialogue. A provocative range of politicians, researchers, legal experts, and businesspeople dispute the best way to fight discrimination. Their essays explore such questions as, How did affirmative-action policies come to be? Who benefits most from them, and who suffers? How do these programs work in hiring, contracting, college admissions, and other fields? What will recent Supreme Court rulings and legislative initiatives mean? And, most fundamentally, does any race-conscious remedy simply perpetuate discrimination? Recognizing affirmative action as more than a black-and-white issue, this book includes the voices of women, Latinos, and Asian-Americans who are also affected but often ignored. A sourcebook of solid facts and surprising arguments, The Affirmative Action Debate is the one book you need to understand and discuss the nation's sharpest political divide.

After Empire

By Dilip Hiro
Authors:
Dilip Hiro
The United States' victory in the Cold War in 1991 led to triumphalist claims that humanity had reached the end of history," and that Washington would enjoy everlasting supremacy. Some years later, U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright called America the indispensable nation." And a senior aide to President George W. Bush crowed: We are an empire now." But by invading Iraq, Bush irreparably undermined U.S. credibility worldwide. And by curtailing Americans' civil liberties in the name of waging an endless war on terror," and resorting to torture in the prisons of occupied Iraq, Afghanistan, and Guantánamo Bay, his administration,as well as America,lost its claim to a moral high ground. Moreover, the 2008-2009 global fiscal meltdown, triggered by the sub-prime mortgage crisis on Wall Street, exposed a stark fact: The heavily indebted America had ceased to be the financial behemoth it had been since World War II. After Empire sketches the contours of a complex world system emerging during the late imperial phase of the U.S. It examines, critically, the events that prepared the ground for the world to move from the tutelage of the sole superpower, America, to a multipolar, post-imperial global order. Refreshingly, it does so from a distinctly non-Western perspective. Unlike other scholars, Dilip Hiro,one of the world's leading experts on the geopolitics of hydrocarbons as well as the Middle East and South and Central Asia,does not offer a comforting thesis that the U.S. is quite capable of accommodating the rising world powers like China, Russia, India, and the European Union while retaining its dominant position at the table. Neither does he frame global politics in a Manichean way,America versus China the West against Asia. The world, he suggests, is set to revisit the pre-World War I Europe, where rulers frequently changed allies and adversaries to achieve the shared aim of keeping the continent free of an overarching power,to date, a privilege enjoyed globally by America. With more than two trillion dollars in its foreign reserves, China's state-owned corporations are busily buying up companies worldwide. By surpassing Saudi Arabia in its oil output, Russia, the number one producer of natural gas, is now the world's foremost producer of hydrocarbons. Its nuclear arsenal is on par with America's. Elsewhere the hydrocarbon-rich nations of Venezuela and Iran are challenging the Washington-dominated status quo respectively in South America and the Middle East. Already, the 27-nation European Union of nearly 500 million has surpassed America as the globe's largest trading entity, and the euro has emerged as a strong rival to the U.S. dollar as a dominant reserve currency. After Empire is realistic and nuanced in its assessment of global politics. Shorn of an ideological bias or a soft corner for America, it abounds in unsettling and stimulating insights on politics, history, hard and soft power, political economy and democracy.

After the Empire

By Emmanuel Todd
Authors:
Emmanuel Todd
In 1975, Emmanuel Todd predicted the decline and fall of the Soviet Union, drawing on research from cultural anthropology and demography as well as economics. At the time his findings challenged a conventional wisdom that saw in the Communist world a dynamic and growing challenge to the West. Generations of Kremlinologists may not have known much, but they knew that Todd was wrong - until 1989, that is, when conventional wisdom retired hurt. Now Todd returns to the debate on the future of international power relations with another startling prediction. Far from being at the apogee of its power, the United States of America is now locked in the messy and disruptive logic of decline. Because the world has long relied on America as a source of stability, it is now desperately important for us to find a way to contain the shock waves from America's impending collapse as the sole superpower. This is not a book from an anti-American, and you will not find a smooth recitation of the standard arguments of Left or Right. It is that unfashionable thing - a determined and unembarrassed attempt to tell the truth.