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"Mr. President"

By Harlow Giles Unger
Authors:
Harlow Giles Unger
In this startling look at the birth of American government, award-winning author Harlow Giles Unger shows how George Washington transformed the presidency from a ceremonial post into the most powerful office on earth. Washington combined political cunning, daring, and sheer genius to seize ever-widening powers and impose law and order on the young nation while ensuring individual freedom for its citizens.

1-2-3, You Love Me

By Jill Howarth
Authors:
Jill Howarth
From one bear hug to twelve pretty red roses, 1-2-3, You Love Me will foster lots of hugs, kisses, and affection between parent and child while teaching young ones to count from one to twelve. With charming love-filled illustrations, sturdy pages, and clever rhyming text, this is the perfect gift for baby for Valentine's Day or any time of year. Sipping on yummy shakes, cuddling puppies, counting the colors in a rainbow, and making music with friends are all ways that children can express their love for their friends and family with Jill Howarth's delightful new board book.

10 Little Kisses

By Taylor Garland
Authors:
Taylor Garland
This Valentine's Day, everyone from puppies to polar bears is saying "I love you!" Share hugs and kisses--and an easy counting lesson--with baby in this sing-along board book full of sweet animal photography.

The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century

By Peter Dreier
Authors:
Peter Dreier
A hundred years ago, any soapbox orator who called for women's suffrage, laws protecting the environment, an end to lynching, or a federal minimum wage was considered a utopian dreamer or a dangerous socialist. Now we take these ideas for granted, because the radical ideas of one generation are often the common sense of the next. We all stand on the shoulders of earlier generations of radicals and reformers who challenged the status quo of their day. Unfortunately, most Americans know little of this progressive history. It isn't taught in most high schools. You can't find it on the major television networks. In popular media, the most persistent interpreter of America's radical past is Glenn Beck, who teaches viewers a wildly inaccurate history of unions, civil rights, and the American Left. The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century , a colourful and witty history of the most influential progressive leaders of the twentieth century and beyond, is the perfect antidote.

100 Headlines That Changed The World

By James Maloney
Authors:
James Maloney
Newpapers are a form of instant history, capturing forever the awe and fascination that great historical events inspire. They are also an intriguing source to return to as they reveal the contemporary view of world-changing events, before it can be shaped by subsequent developments. While newspapers have been around for centuries, it was only when the Industrial Revolution encouraged mass production that newspapers with attention-grabbing banner headlines began to be commonplace. Now that newspapers seem to be in decline, we can look back at the period from the late 19th to early 21st century as the heyday of the newspaper, as well as a period in which the world changed beyond recognition.Journalist James Maloney details the stories behind the 100 most momentous headlines, including:Abraham Lincoln Assassinated in 1865.Jack the Ripper (1888).Boer War begins (11 Oct 1899). Russian Revolution (1917).Wall Street Crashes in 1929.Hitler Sweeps to Power' in 1933.Britain declares war with Germany 3 Sept 1939).Japan declares war on US/ Attack on Pearl Harbor (7 December 1941). Communist China founded by Mao Tse-tung (1 October 1949).Watson and Crick discover DNA structure (1953).Cuban missile crisis (1962). J.F. Kennedy Assassinated (22 Nov 1963).First man on the moon/Apollo 11 (21 July 1969).Scientists identify AIDS (1981). Chernobyl (April 26 1986).Mandela (age 75) freed from jail (1990). Death of Princess Diana (31 Aug 1997).911 terror attacks (2001).Saddam Hussein's capture (13 Dec 2003).Bin Laden Shot Dead. in 2011.Death of Steve Jobs/Apple (5 October 2011).

100 Military Inventions that Changed the World

By Philip Russell
Authors:
Philip Russell
Nothing ensures the rapid development of new technology like the involvement of the military. From the trebuchet and the cannon to the tank and the ballistic missile, military research programmes have produced the most devastating weapons imaginable, but military masterminds are responsible for a number of surprises along the way as well.Radar, walkie-talkies and the jet engine are more obvious examples of military inventions that are now in everyday use around the world, but there are plenty of items with which all of us come into contact on a daily basis that have been developed from military technology. Rod Green describes how the microwave oven in your kitchen, the sat-nav in your car or the Internet that you use every day all owe their existence to the military as he takes us on a highly entertaining voyage of discovery through the world of military inventions ancient and modern.
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The 12 Days of Christmas

By Jill Howarth
Authors:
Jill Howarth
Share the joy of the holiday season with the classic Christmas carol, "The Twelve Days of Christmas." Readers will sing along with adorable woodland animals as they recount all the extravagant gifts they've received each day from their true loves.Featuring fun, retro-inspired illustrations on thick, sturdy pages, The 12 Days of Christmas is a must-have to complete any Christmas celebration year after year!

The 12-year Reich

By Richard Grunberger
Authors:
Richard Grunberger
How did people talk during the Third Reich? What films could they see? What political jokes did they tell? Did Nazi ranting about the role of women (no make-up, smoking, or dieting) correspond with reality? What was the effect of the regime on family life (where fathers were encouraged to inform on sons, and children on parents)? When the country embraced National Socialism in 1933, how did that acceptance impact the churches, the civil service, farmers, housewives, businessmen, health care, sports, education, "justice," the army, the arts, and the Jews? Using examples that range from the horrifying to the absurd, Grunberger captures vividly the nightmarish texture of the times and reveals how Nazis effectively permeated the everyday lives of German citizens. The result is a brilliant, terrifying glimpse of the people who dwelt along the edges of an abyss,often disappearing into it.

1619

By James Horn
Authors:
James Horn
1619 offers a new interpretation of the significance of Jamestown in the long trajectory of American history. Jamestown, the cradle of American democracy, also saw the birth of our nation's greatest challenge: the corrosive legacy of slavery and racism that have deepened and entrenched stark inequalities in our society. After running Jamestown under martial law from 1610-1616, the Virginia Company turned toward representative government in an effort to provide settlers with more control over their own affairs and more incentive to invest further in the colony. Governor Edwin Sandys dreamed of creating a real commonwealth, to provide for the interests of settlers and Indians alike. Thus, in late July 1619, the newly-formed General Assembly gathered to introduce "just Laws for the happy guiding and governing of the people." It was the first legislature in America, and history has cast it as the foundation of American freedom and democracy. From that moment on, propertied white colonists became accustomed to freedoms that would have been unthinkable in England with its layers of customs and hierarchy of courts and regulations, and these expanding political and economic freedoms attracted countless British immigrants and other Europeans to Virginia and the American colonies. But those very freedoms also permitted the wholesale and largely unchecked exploitation of poor white laborers and non-European peoples. More than nine-tenths of all those arriving in Virginia at this time were brought in some form of servitude or labor contract. In a cruel irony, 1619 also saw the arrival of the first African slaves in Virginia. The establishment of the General Assembly did nothing to ameliorate these disparities, but rather put ever more power in the hands of local grandees. Sandys's dream of creating a commonwealth in the interests of settlers and Indians proved short-lived. But the twin pillars of democracy-the rule of law and representative government based on the consent of the people-survived and flourished. It was his greatest legacy to America. What was lost was his steadfast conviction that serving the common good served all. This is a pattern we recognize all too well in modern American society-opportunities are not shared, inequality is rampant, racism is systemic. We would like to think these are problems that can be solved by expanding representative democracy; Jamestown teaches us, instead, that these are problems have long been created and encouraged by American democracy. Casting a skeptical eye on deeply-cherished myths, 1619 will be essential reading for anyone struggling to understand the paradox of American freedom.

1789

By David Andress
Authors:
David Andress
In 1789 the world stood at the threshold of the modern age. While the French Revolution and the election of George Washington seemed to herald a new global order, Britain stood shocked at the new world unfolding before her. Two documents were drafted which would change the very meanings of citizens and statehood: the US Bill of Rights and the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen. The age of royal despotism had ended.But beneath this veneer of progress, darker forces were at work: the French Revolution spiralled out of control, American slavery expanded and the armed forces of the British Empire were unleashed in India. From 'mad' King George III to J.J. Rousseau and Thomas Paine, from Pitt the Younger to Robespierre, David Andress illuminates a world on the brink through the men who held its future in their hands.

1812

By George C. Daughan
Authors:
George C. Daughan
When war broke out between Britain and the United States in 1812, America's prospects looked dismal. British naval aggression made it clear that the ocean would be the war's primary battlefield,but America's navy, only twenty ships strong, faced a practiced British fleet of more than a thousand men-of-war. Still, through a combination of nautical deftness and sheer bravado, a handful of heroic captains and their stalwart crews managed to turn the tide of the war, besting the haughty skippers of the mighty Royal Navy and cementing America's newly won independence. In 1812: The Navy's War , award-winning naval historian George C. Daughan draws on a wealth of archival research to tell the amazing story of this tiny, battletested team of Americans and their improbable yet pivotal victories. Daughan thrillingly details the pitched naval battles that shaped the war, and shows how these clashes proved the navy's vital role in preserving the nation's interests and independence. A stunning contribution to military and national history, 1812: The Navy's War is the first complete account in more than a century of how the U.S. Navy rescued the fledgling nation and secured America's future.

1836 Facts About The Alamo And The Texas War For Independence

By Mary Deborah Petite
Authors:
Mary Deborah Petite
This handy paperback in the Savas "Facts About" series covers all aspects of the famous campaign in surprising detail, with much hard-to-find information on the background of the participants, the Mexican viewpoint, and the continuing mystery of possible survivors. Contains bibliography and update on recent research.

1848: Year Of Revolution

By Mike Rapport
Authors:
Mike Rapport
In 1848, Europe was engulfed in a firestorm of revolution. The streets of cities from Paris to Bucharest and from Berlin to Palermo were barricaded and flooded by armed insurgents proclaiming political liberties and national freedom. The conservative order which had held sway since the fall of Napoleon in 1815 crumbled beneath the revolutionary assault. This book narrates the breathtaking events which overtook Europe in 1848, tracing brilliantly their course from the exhilaration of the liberal triumph, through the fear of social chaos to the final despair of defeat and disillusionment. The failures of 1848 would scar European history with the contradictions of authoritarianism and revolution until deep into the twentieth century.
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