Buy Fiction, Non-Fiction Books & e-books Little, Brown Book Group

Search Our Books

Book Title

Filter By

Clear all
Our books

Messages

By Matthew McKay, Martha Davis, Patrick Fanning
Authors:
Matthew McKay, Martha Davis, Patrick Fanning
Many people assume that good communicators possess an intrinsic talent for speaking and listening to others, a gift that can't be learned or improved. The reality is that communication skills are developed with deliberate effort and practice, and learning to understand others and communicate your ideas more clearly will improve every facet of your life.Messages has already helped thousands of people build communication skills and cultivate better relationships with friends, family members, coworkers, and partners. With this fully revised and updated fourth edition, you'll discover new skills to help you communicate your ideas more effectively and become a better listener. Learn how to:- Read body language- Develop skills for couples communication- Negotiate and resolve conflicts- Communicate with family members- Handle group interactions- Talk to children- Master public speaking- Prepare for job interviewsThis new edition features a much-needed chapter on digital communication. Effective communication can easily be compromised when you're not able to read your conversation partner's body language, facial expression, or vocal tone. This chapter teaches you how to express yourself well via phone, email, texting, and video-all the skills you need to thrive in the digital age.
  • More

How Things Are Made

By Sharon Rose, Andrew Terranova
Authors:
Sharon Rose, Andrew Terranova
What are bulletproof vests made of? How do manufacturers get lipstick into the tube? How much brass does it take to make a trumpet? The answers-and so much more fascinating information-can be found in How Things Are Made, a behind-the-scenes look at the production everyday objects of all kinds, from guitars, sunscreen, and seismographs to running shoes, jetpacks, and chocolate.Each page of How Things Are Made features informative step-by-step text along with detailed but easy-to-follow illustrations, diagrams, and sidebars to tell the stories behind the things we sometimes take for granted but often wonder about. Did you know that Edison didn't really invent the light bulb? Or that the first bar code was on a pack of Wrigley Spearmint gum? Or that a maple seed inspired the design for the helicopter? Discover these fascinating anecdotes and much more in How Things Are Made.
  • More

Language at the Speed of Sight

By Mark Seidenberg
Authors:
Mark Seidenberg
According to a leading cognitive scientist, we've been teaching reading wrong. The latest science reveals how we can do it right.In 2011, when an international survey reported that students in Shanghai dramatically outperformed American students in reading, math, and science, President Obama declared it a "Sputnik moment": a wake-up call about the dismal state of American education. Little has changed, however, since then: over half of our children still read at a basic level and few become highly proficient. Many American children and adults are not functionally literate, with serious consequences. Poor readers are more likely to drop out of the educational system and as adults are unable to fully participate in the workforce, adequately manage their own health care, or advance their children's education.In Language at the Speed of Sight, internationally renowned cognitive scientist Mark Seidenberg reveals the underexplored science of reading, which spans cognitive science, neurobiology, and linguistics. As Seidenberg shows, the disconnect between science and education is a major factor in America's chronic underachievement. How we teach reading places many children at risk of failure, discriminates against poorer kids, and discourages even those who could have become more successful readers. Children aren't taught basic print skills because educators cling to the disproved theory that good readers guess the words in texts, a strategy that encourages skimming instead of close reading. Interventions for children with reading disabilities are delayed because parents are mistakenly told their kids will catch up if they work harder. Learning to read is more difficult for children who speak a minority dialect in the home, but that is not reflected in classroom practices. By building on science's insights, we can improve how our children read, and take real steps toward solving the inequality that illiteracy breeds.Both an expert look at our relationship with the written word and a rousing call to action, Language at the Speed of Sight is essential for parents, educators, policy makers, and all others who want to understand why so many fail to read, and how to change that.
  • More

Reading Allowed

By Chris Paling
Authors:
Chris Paling
'Paling's deftly drawn vignettes are frequently funny, sometimes sad and occasionally troubling . . . Borrow a copy from your local library, if you still have one. Better yet, buy it' Neil Armstrong, Mail on Sunday'Not only was I captivated by Paling's lovingly wrought series of pen portraits, I was amused, moved and - perhaps most surprising of all - uplifted' John Preston, Daily Mail'There are many detractors who question whether libraries are still relevant in the digital age. Paling's keenly and kindly observed account of his encounters offers a gentle insight as to why they still are' Helen Davies, Sunday TimesChris works as a librarian in a small-town library in the south of England. This is the story of the library, its staff, and the fascinating group of people who use the library on a regular basis. We'll meet characters like the street-sleepers Brewer, Wolf and Spencer, who are always the first through the doors. The Mad Hatter, an elderly man who scurries around manically, searching for books. Sons of Anarchy Alan, a young Down's Syndrome man addicted to the American TV drama series. Startled Stewart, a gay man with a spray-on tan who pops in most days for a nice chat, sharking for good-looking foreign language students. And Trish, who is relentlessly cheerful and always dressed in pink - she has never married, but the marital status of everybody she meets is of huge interest to her.Some of the characters' stories are tragic, some are amusing, some are genuinely surreal, but together they will paint a bigger picture of the world we live in today, and of a library's hugely important place within it. Yes, of course, people come in to borrow books, but the library is also the equivalent of the village pump. It's one of the few places left where anyone, regardless of age or income or background, can wander in and find somebody to listen to their concerns, to share the time of day. Reading Allowed will provide us with a fascinating portrait of a place that we all value and cherish, but which few of us truly know very much about ...
  • More

Good For Nothing

By Abigail Marsh
Authors:
Abigail Marsh
Titled The Fear Factor in the USA'A riveting ride through your own brain' - Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of OriginalsWINNER of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology's book prize for 'The Promotion of Social and Personality Science'If humans are fundamentally good, why do we engage in acts of great cruelty? If we are evil, why do we sometimes help others at a cost to ourselves? Whether humans are good or evil is a question that has plagued philosophers and scientists for as long as there have been philosophers and scientists.Many argue that we are fundamentally selfish, and only the rules and laws of our societies and our own relentless efforts of will can save us from ourselves. But is this really true? Abigail Marsh is a social neuroscientist who has closely studied the brains of both the worst and the best among us-from children with psychopathic traits whose families live in fear of them, to adult altruists who have given their own kidneys to strangers. Her groundbreaking findings suggest a possibility that is more optimistic than the dominant view. Humans are not good or evil, but are equally (and fundamentally) capable of good and evil.In Good for Nothing Marsh explores the human capacity for caring, drawing on cutting edge research findings from clinical, translational and brain imaging investigations on the nature of empathy, altruism, and aggression and brings us closer to understanding the basis of humans' social nature.'You won't be able to put it down' - Daniel Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of Stumbling on Happiness'[It] reads like a thriller... One of the most mind-opening books I have read in years' - Matthieu Ricard, author of Altruism
  • More

BTOOOM!, Vol. 18

By Junya Inoue
Authors:
Junya Inoue
  • More

Curation

By Michael Bhaskar
Authors:
Michael Bhaskar
'A terrific and important book . . . it's a great, fresh take on how the 21st century is transforming the way we select everything from food to music' David Bodanis, author of E=MC2In the past two years humanity has produced more data than the rest of human history combined. We carry a library of data in our pockets, accessible at any second. We have more information and more goods at our disposal than we know what to do with. There is no longer any competitive advantage in creating more information. Today, value lies in curation: selecting, finding and cutting down to show what really matters.Curation reveals how a little-used word from the world of museums became a crucial and at times controversial strategy for the twenty-first century. Today's most successful companies - Apple, Netflix, Amazon - have used curation to power their growth, by offering customers more tailored and appropriate choices.Curation answers the question of how we can live and prosper in an age of information overload. In the context of excess, it is not only a sound business strategy, but a way to make sense of the world.
  • More

BTOOOM!, Vol. 17

By Junya Inoue
Authors:
Junya Inoue
Soga's death crushes Ryouta, freeing him from whatever was subconsciously holding him back. With thoughts of kindness and humanity left by the wayside, he zeros in on what it will take to beat the game most efficiently. In the process, he faces off against the duo of Kira and Tougou. How will Kira handle having his back to the wall now that he's grown up a little?! The dust settles on the island following the rule change, and a new team is formed! And the veil is lifted on Oda's unspoken past, as a new arc begins and an old face from Oda's past joins the fray!
  • More

Baseball's Best 1000 (Fourth Revised Edition)

By Derek Gentile, Timothy Cebula, Jack Passetto, Brian Sullivan
Authors:
Derek Gentile, Timothy Cebula, Jack Passetto, Brian Sullivan
Using various (and completely subjective) criteria including lifetime statistics, personal and professional contributions to the game at large, sportsmanship, character, popularity with the fans, and more, sports writer Derek Gentile ranks the best players of all time from 1 to 1,000. The selection spans the generations from Edward "Cocky" Collins (1906-1930) to Miguel Cabrera (2003-present). Dozens of Negro league players are also included, as well as sidebars on the greatest Japanese players, women players, and "pre-historic" players from the time before stats and other information was formally recorded. Each entry includes the player's name, positions played, teams played for, and years played, as well as lifetime stats and a biography of the player including his great (and not-so-great) moments and little-known facts. Baseball's Best 1,000 is sure to spark controversy and debate among fans.
  • More

Mount Buggery to Nowhere Else

By Eamon Evans
Authors:
Eamon Evans
The stories behind Australia's many, many strange, inappropriate and downright hilarious place names.From Dismal Swamp to Useless Loop, Intercourse Island to Dead Mans Gully, Mount Buggery to Nowhere Else, Australia has some of the strangest, funniest, weirdest and most out-of-place names going - now described and explained in one humorous and fascinating book.Australia's vast spaces and irreverent, larrikin history have given us some of the best place names in the world. Ranging from the less than positive (Linger and Die Hill, NSW), to the indelicate (Scented Knob, WA), the idiotic (Eggs and Bacon Bay, TAS) to the inappropriate and the just plain fascinating, MOUNT BUGGERY TO NOWHERE ELSE is a toponymical journey through this nation of weird and wonderful places.'A hilarious and unusual tour of Australia and its history.' DAILY TELEGRAPH
  • More

BTOOOM!, Vol. 16

By Junya Inoue
Authors:
Junya Inoue
The equilibrium on the island has been greatly thrown off by Takanohashi's sudden announcement. There's only one day to go before the game is up, and only three people left who can beat it...leaving the players bewildered by this sudden rule change. But that bewilderment turns into anger and leads to suspicion, causing the bonds between players start to fray. And when Himiko is wandering around the island, looking for Ryouta, another stray catches sight of her...Will Himiko ever be reunited with Ryouta?! Meanwhile, Ryouta himself is assaulted by a tragedy born out of suspicion!!
  • More

School-Live!, Vol. 5

By Norimitsu Kaihou, Sadoru Chiba
Authors:
Norimitsu Kaihou, Sadoru Chiba
Yuki, Kurumi, Rii-san, and Mii-kun of the School Living Club are planning a school festival when suddenly...they receive a message from a survivor?! But that glimpse of hope is just the beginning of an unheard of danger looming over Megurigaoka High School...
  • More

Rainbow in the Cloud

By Maya Angelou
Authors:
Maya Angelou
Since the publication of her first autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou has been celebrated as one of America's most important writers and her words are indelibly imprinted on the hearts of millions.Inspired by the woman who has inspired us all, Rainbow in the Cloud offers nearly 300 of Dr Angelou's wonderful quotes, organised in themed sections (including art, love, spirituality, womanhood, and life in the American South) - from sage advice and beautiful stanzas to humorous quips and pointed observations - drawn from each of her published works and from her celebrated (and much shared) social media posts. This collection also features special words of wisdom she shared often with her family, chosen by her son, Guy Johnson.
  • More