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Maps of the World

By Enrico Lavagno, Sacco and Vallarino
Authors:
Enrico Lavagno
Illustrated by:
Sacco and Vallarino
Covering every continent, country, even outer space, MAPS OF THE WORLD is a vibrant and comprehensive atlas that children of all ages will love to explore. The dozens of colorful, detailed maps are filled with charming, educational icons representing the aboriginal people in Australia, giant tortoises in the Galapagos, the Gold Rush in California, traditional dress in Mali, and even James Bond in England. Flip the next page in the book, and the corresponding icon key explains hundreds of these cultural, environmental, and societal illustrations. Organized by continent, the atlas also includes details on populations, language, agricultural, politics, and other bite-size facts. Each map includes a link allowing kids to download a version of them on computers and tablets to explore even further. Captivating and comprehensive, MAPS OF THE WORLD will entice even the most reluctant young explorer.

Messages

By Matthew McKay, Martha Davis, Patrick Fanning
Authors:
Matthew McKay, Martha Davis, Patrick Fanning
Many people assume that good communicators possess an intrinsic talent for speaking and listening to others, a gift that can't be learned or improved. The reality is that communication skills are developed with deliberate effort and practice, and learning to understand others and communicate your ideas more clearly will improve every facet of your life.Messages has already helped thousands of people build communication skills and cultivate better relationships with friends, family members, coworkers, and partners. With this fully revised and updated fourth edition, you'll discover new skills to help you communicate your ideas more effectively and become a better listener. Learn how to:- Read body language- Develop skills for couples communication- Negotiate and resolve conflicts- Communicate with family members- Handle group interactions- Talk to children- Master public speaking- Prepare for job interviewsThis new edition features a much-needed chapter on digital communication. Effective communication can easily be compromised when you're not able to read your conversation partner's body language, facial expression, or vocal tone. This chapter teaches you how to express yourself well via phone, email, texting, and video-all the skills you need to thrive in the digital age.

How Things Are Made

By Sharon Rose, Andrew Terranova
Authors:
Sharon Rose, Andrew Terranova
What are bulletproof vests made of? How do manufacturers get lipstick into the tube? How much brass does it take to make a trumpet? The answers-and so much more fascinating information-can be found in How Things Are Made, a behind-the-scenes look at the production everyday objects of all kinds, from guitars, sunscreen, and seismographs to running shoes, jetpacks, and chocolate.Each page of How Things Are Made features informative step-by-step text along with detailed but easy-to-follow illustrations, diagrams, and sidebars to tell the stories behind the things we sometimes take for granted but often wonder about. Did you know that Edison didn't really invent the light bulb? Or that the first bar code was on a pack of Wrigley Spearmint gum? Or that a maple seed inspired the design for the helicopter? Discover these fascinating anecdotes and much more in How Things Are Made.

Language at the Speed of Sight

By Mark Seidenberg
Authors:
Mark Seidenberg
According to a leading cognitive scientist, we've been teaching reading wrong. The latest science reveals how we can do it right.In 2011, when an international survey reported that students in Shanghai dramatically outperformed American students in reading, math, and science, President Obama declared it a "Sputnik moment": a wake-up call about the dismal state of American education. Little has changed, however, since then: over half of our children still read at a basic level and few become highly proficient. Many American children and adults are not functionally literate, with serious consequences. Poor readers are more likely to drop out of the educational system and as adults are unable to fully participate in the workforce, adequately manage their own health care, or advance their children's education.In Language at the Speed of Sight, internationally renowned cognitive scientist Mark Seidenberg reveals the underexplored science of reading, which spans cognitive science, neurobiology, and linguistics. As Seidenberg shows, the disconnect between science and education is a major factor in America's chronic underachievement. How we teach reading places many children at risk of failure, discriminates against poorer kids, and discourages even those who could have become more successful readers. Children aren't taught basic print skills because educators cling to the disproved theory that good readers guess the words in texts, a strategy that encourages skimming instead of close reading. Interventions for children with reading disabilities are delayed because parents are mistakenly told their kids will catch up if they work harder. Learning to read is more difficult for children who speak a minority dialect in the home, but that is not reflected in classroom practices. By building on science's insights, we can improve how our children read, and take real steps toward solving the inequality that illiteracy breeds.Both an expert look at our relationship with the written word and a rousing call to action, Language at the Speed of Sight is essential for parents, educators, policy makers, and all others who want to understand why so many fail to read, and how to change that.
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Reading Allowed

By Chris Paling
Authors:
Chris Paling
'Paling's deftly drawn vignettes are frequently funny, sometimes sad and occasionally troubling . . . Borrow a copy from your local library, if you still have one. Better yet, buy it' Neil Armstrong, Mail on Sunday'Not only was I captivated by Paling's lovingly wrought series of pen portraits, I was amused, moved and - perhaps most surprising of all - uplifted' John Preston, Daily Mail'There are many detractors who question whether libraries are still relevant in the digital age. Paling's keenly and kindly observed account of his encounters offers a gentle insight as to why they still are' Helen Davies, Sunday TimesChris works as a librarian in a small-town library in the south of England. This is the story of the library, its staff, and the fascinating group of people who use the library on a regular basis. We'll meet characters like the street-sleepers Brewer, Wolf and Spencer, who are always the first through the doors. The Mad Hatter, an elderly man who scurries around manically, searching for books. Sons of Anarchy Alan, a young Down's Syndrome man addicted to the American TV drama series. Startled Stewart, a gay man with a spray-on tan who pops in most days for a nice chat, sharking for good-looking foreign language students. And Trish, who is relentlessly cheerful and always dressed in pink - she has never married, but the marital status of everybody she meets is of huge interest to her.Some of the characters' stories are tragic, some are amusing, some are genuinely surreal, but together they will paint a bigger picture of the world we live in today, and of a library's hugely important place within it. Yes, of course, people come in to borrow books, but the library is also the equivalent of the village pump. It's one of the few places left where anyone, regardless of age or income or background, can wander in and find somebody to listen to their concerns, to share the time of day. Reading Allowed will provide us with a fascinating portrait of a place that we all value and cherish, but which few of us truly know very much about ...
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Rally Point

By Chris Gibson
Authors:
Chris Gibson
A smart and surprising political inventory for how America can reunite and revitalize in a time of crisis.Written by an admired leader of the Republican party, RALLY POINT: Five Tasks to Unite the Country and Revitalize the American Dream looks past the 2016 election, past the finger pointing and conventional political thinking, to focus on clear, primary principles that conservatives must debate and defend to protect the future of America.Raised in a working-class family in upstate New York, the first in his family to go to college, paid for in part by his service in the National Guard, Chris Gibson rose from Private to Colonel in the Army, including combat command in the storied 82nd Airborne Division. RALLY POINT is his story: what he's learned from the "School of Hard Knocks" and how he's applied those precious life lessons during his service in Iraq and in Congress.Drawn from a deep appreciation of history and American exceptionalism, Gibson provides incisive and frank analysis of the current political environment, including President Trump, and provides a roadmap based on time-tested Founding principles to help unite our country and revitalize the American Dream. RALLY POINT is a thoughtful, compelling, enjoyable read - a must for serious-minded Americans looking for answers in this challenging political environment.

Good For Nothing

By Abigail Marsh
Authors:
Abigail Marsh
Titled The Fear Factor in the USA'A riveting ride through your own brain' - Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of OriginalsWINNER of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology's book prize for 'The Promotion of Social and Personality Science'If humans are fundamentally good, why do we engage in acts of great cruelty? If we are evil, why do we sometimes help others at a cost to ourselves? Whether humans are good or evil is a question that has plagued philosophers and scientists for as long as there have been philosophers and scientists.Many argue that we are fundamentally selfish, and only the rules and laws of our societies and our own relentless efforts of will can save us from ourselves. But is this really true? Abigail Marsh is a social neuroscientist who has closely studied the brains of both the worst and the best among us-from children with psychopathic traits whose families live in fear of them, to adult altruists who have given their own kidneys to strangers. Her groundbreaking findings suggest a possibility that is more optimistic than the dominant view. Humans are not good or evil, but are equally (and fundamentally) capable of good and evil.In Good for Nothing Marsh explores the human capacity for caring, drawing on cutting edge research findings from clinical, translational and brain imaging investigations on the nature of empathy, altruism, and aggression and brings us closer to understanding the basis of humans' social nature.'You won't be able to put it down' - Daniel Gilbert, New York Times bestselling author of Stumbling on Happiness'[It] reads like a thriller... One of the most mind-opening books I have read in years' - Matthieu Ricard, author of Altruism
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Yowamushi Pedal, Vol. 6

By Wataru Watanabe
Authors:
Wataru Watanabe

Curation

By Michael Bhaskar
Authors:
Michael Bhaskar
'A terrific and important book . . . it's a great, fresh take on how the 21st century is transforming the way we select everything from food to music' David Bodanis, author of E=MC2In the past two years humanity has produced more data than the rest of human history combined. We carry a library of data in our pockets, accessible at any second. We have more information and more goods at our disposal than we know what to do with. There is no longer any competitive advantage in creating more information. Today, value lies in curation: selecting, finding and cutting down to show what really matters.Curation reveals how a little-used word from the world of museums became a crucial and at times controversial strategy for the twenty-first century. Today's most successful companies - Apple, Netflix, Amazon - have used curation to power their growth, by offering customers more tailored and appropriate choices.Curation answers the question of how we can live and prosper in an age of information overload. In the context of excess, it is not only a sound business strategy, but a way to make sense of the world.
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This is What a Librarian Looks Like

By Kyle Cassidy
Authors:
Kyle Cassidy
In 2014, author and photographer Kyle Cassidy published a photo essay on Slate.com called "This is What A Librarian Looks Like," a montage of portraits and a tribute to librarians. Since then, Cassidy has made it his mission to remind us of how essential librarians and libraries are to our communities. His subjects are men and women of all ages, backgrounds, and personal style-from pink hair and leather jackets to button-downs and blazers. In short, notnecessarily what one thinks a librarian looks like. The nearly 220 librarians photographed also share their personal thoughts on what it means to be a librarian. This is What A Librarian Looks Like also includes original essay by some of our most beloved writers, journalists, and commentators including Neil Gaiman, George R.R. Martin, Nancy Pearl, Cory Doctorow, Paula Poundstone, Amanda Palmer, Peter Sagal, Jeff VanderMeer, John Scalzi, Sara Farizan, Amy Dickinson, and others. Cassidy also profiles a handful of especially influential librarians and libraries

Brave

By Svetlana Chmakova
Authors:
Svetlana Chmakova
Still on high alert about the looming threat of sunspots, Jensen of the art club reaches out to the school newspaper to spread his message. But when Jenny and Akilah discover that Berrybrook's resident bullies have set their sights on Jensen, the girls are determined to use their positions on the school paper to shine a light on the issue.When a different incident causes a rift in their friendship, though, working together for the sake of the story may be impossible...As the bullying escalates, will Jensen be left to face this fate worse than sunspots entirely on his own??The charming world of Berrybrook Middle School gets a little bigger in this follow-up to Svetlana Chmakova'sAwkward!
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Baseball's Best 1000 (Fourth Revised Edition)

By Derek Gentile, Timothy Cebula, Jack Passetto, Brian Sullivan
Authors:
Derek Gentile, Timothy Cebula, Jack Passetto, Brian Sullivan
Using various (and completely subjective) criteria including lifetime statistics, personal and professional contributions to the game at large, sportsmanship, character, popularity with the fans, and more, sports writer Derek Gentile ranks the best players of all time from 1 to 1,000. The selection spans the generations from Edward "Cocky" Collins (1906-1930) to Miguel Cabrera (2003-present). Dozens of Negro league players are also included, as well as sidebars on the greatest Japanese players, women players, and "pre-historic" players from the time before stats and other information was formally recorded. Each entry includes the player's name, positions played, teams played for, and years played, as well as lifetime stats and a biography of the player including his great (and not-so-great) moments and little-known facts. Baseball's Best 1,000 is sure to spark controversy and debate among fans.
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Yowamushi Pedal, Vol. 5

By Wataru Watanabe
Authors:
Wataru Watanabe
The nation's fiercest competitors gather at Hakone in a flurry of rampaging muscle for the inter-high!Throwing Japan's strongest high school cyclists together, the inter-high tournament begins with a clash of hearts and bodies ready for battle! Passions run high and old rivalries reignite - Kinjou and Fukutomi, Imaizumi and Midousuji...and Sakamichi and Sangaku!! And when the action-packed sprinting stage of the competition gets underway, Naruko and Tadokoro have their own war to wage as they lose ground on Hakone Academy's "Sprinting Machine," Izumida!! With the title of "Fastest Rider" on the line, who will come out on top?!