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Talk

By Elizabeth Stokoe
Authors:
Elizabeth Stokoe
We spend much of our days talking. Yet we know little about the conversational engine that drives our everyday lives. We are pushed and pulled around by language far more than we realize, yet are seduced by stereotypes and myths about communication.This book will change the way you think about talk. It will explain the big pay-offs to understanding conversation scientifically. Elizabeth Stokoe, a social psychologist, has spent over twenty years collecting and analysing real conversations across settings as varied as first dates, crisis negotiation, sales encounters and medical communication. This book describes some of the findings of her own research, and that of other conversation analysts around the world. Through numerous examples from real interactions between friends, partners, colleagues, police officers, mediators, doctors and many others, you will learn that some of what you think you know about talk is wrong. But you will also uncover fresh insights about how to have better conversations - using the evidence from fifty years of research about the science of talk.
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She Walks in Beauty

By Caroline Kennedy
Authors:
Caroline Kennedy
A priceless resource--and gift--for anyone seeking a deeper understanding and appreciation of what it means to be a woman.In SHE WALKS IN BEAUTY, Caroline Kennedy has marshaled the gifts of our greatest poets to pay a personal tribute to the human experience, this time to the complex and fascinating subject of womanhood. Inspired by her own reflections on more than fifty years of life as a young girl, woman, wife and mother, She Walks in Beauty draws on poetry's eloquent wisdom to ponder the many joys and challenges of being a woman. Kennedy has divided the collection into sections that signify to her the most notable milestones in a woman's life, and she begins each with an introduction where she explores and celebrates the most important elements of life's journey.

What the Dickens?!

By Bryan Kozlowski
Authors:
Bryan Kozlowski
GRAB A BUMPER, FORGET YOUR FANTEEGS, AND ROAM AT A FOOT-PACE THROUGH THE TWISTY ALLEYWAYS OF THE VICTORIAN VERNACULAR!What larks! Dive into the world of literature's ultimate wordsmith, Charles Dickens, in this literary romp through his finest quips, barbs, and turns of phrase.Featuring 200 of Dickens' best-loved words, drawn from his fifteen novels and hundreds of short stories, What the Dickens?! is full of period-appropriate definitions, pithy commentary, and charming illustrations. Perfect for word nerds and book lovers of all ages, this volume will have you dragging your friends to the hippo-comedietta and bonneting your anti-Pickwickian adversaries like a proper Victorian in no time!

Words and Rules

By Steven Pinker
Authors:
Steven Pinker
How does language work? How do children learn their mother tongue? Why do languages change over time, making Shakespearean English difficult for us and Chaucer's English almost incomprehensible? Why do languages have so many quirks and irregularities? Are they all fundamentally alike? How are new words created? Where in the brain does language reside?In Words and Rules , Steven Pinker answers these and many other questions. His book shares the wit and style of his classic, The Language Instinct , but explores language in a completely different way. In Words and Rules , Pinker explains the profound mysteries of language by picking a deceptively simple phenomenon and examining it from every angle. The phenomenon,regular and irregular verbs,connects an astonishing array of topics in the sciences and humanities: the history of languages, the theories of Noam Chomsky and his critics the attempts to simulate language using computer simulations of neural networks the illuminating errors of children as they begin to speak the nature of human concepts the peculiarities of the English language major ideas in the history of Western philosophy the latest techniques in identifying genes and imaging the living brain.Pinker makes sense of all of this with the help of a single, powerful idea: that language comprises a mental dictionary of memorized words and a mental grammar of creative rules. The idea extends beyond language and offers insight into the very nature of the human mind. This is a sparkling, eye-opening and utterly original book by one of the world's leading cognitive scientists.

Eat What You Love-Everyday! (QVC)

By Marlene Koch
Authors:
Marlene Koch

BiblioTech

By John Palfrey
Authors:
John Palfrey
Libraries today are more important than ever. More than just book repositories, libraries can become bulwarks against some of the most crucial challenges of our age: unequal access to education, jobs, and information. In BiblioTech , educator and technology expert John Palfrey argues that anyone seeking to participate in the 21st century needs to understand how to find and use the vast stores of information available online. And libraries, which play a crucial role in making these skills and information available, are at risk. In order to survive our rapidly modernizing world and dwindling government funding, libraries must make the transition to a digital future as soon as possible,by digitizing print material and ensuring that born-digital material is publicly available online. Not all of these changes will be easy for libraries to implement. But as Palfrey boldly argues, these modifications are vital if we hope to save libraries and, through them, the American democratic ideal.

Jedburgh Justice and Kentish Fire

By Paul Anthony Jones
Authors:
Paul Anthony Jones
Did you know that Jedburgh Justice is 'executing someone first, then giving them a trial'? Or that Kentish Fire is 'applauding sarcastically to silence your opponents'? From the author of Haggard Hawks and Paltry Poltroons, this is a fascinating collection of curious phrases and expressions from the English language, together with the stories of their etymology and anecdotes about their use in history. Where Haggard Hawks focused on lists of ten words of a particular kind, this collection instead focuses on lists phrases and expressions, also arranged by their quirky and specific origins. The contents will include: 10 PHRASES DERIVED FROM PLACES IN BRITAIN (Jedburgh justice, Kentish fire, Scarborough warning.) 10 PHRASES DERIVED FROM PLACES IN LONDON (A draught on the pump at Aldgate, Kent Street ejectment.) 10 PHRASES DERIVED FROM PLACES IN AMERICA (Hollywood yes, Michigan bankroll, Chicago Overcoat.) 10 LATIN PHRASES USED IN ENGLISH (Quid pro quo, nunc est bibendum.) 10 FRENCH PHRASES USED IN ENGLISH (La vie en rose, C'est la guerre, Revenons à nos moutons.) 10 SHAKESPEAREAN EXPRESSIONS (Gild the lily, Salad days, All that glitters is not gold.) 10 LITERARY EXPRESSIONS (A thing of beauty is a joy forever, Abandon hope all ye who enter here.) 10 PHRASES FROM COMICS & CARTOONS (Keep up with the Joneses, Mutt and Jeff.) 10 PHRASES FROM SONGS (Miss Otis regrets, The birds and the bees, Potato po-tah-to.) 10 WAYS OF SAYING 'WOW' (Great Scott, My stars, Mamma mia.)
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Sundays at Eight

By Brian Lamb, C-SPAN
Authors:
Brian Lamb, C-SPAN
For the last 25 years, Sunday nights at 8pm on C-SPAN has been appointment television for many Americans. During that time, host Brian Lamb has invited people to his Capitol Hill studio for hour-long conversations about contemporary society and history. In today's soundbite culture that hour remains one of television's last vestiges of in-depth, civil conversation.First came C-SPAN's Booknotes in 1989, which by the time it ended in December 2004, was the longest-running author-interview program in American broadcast history. Many of the most notable nonfiction authors of its era were featured over the course of 800 episodes, and the conversations became a defining hour for the network and for nonfiction writers.In January 2005, C-SPAN embarked on a new chapter with the launch of Q and A. Again one hour of uninterrupted conversation but the focus was expanded to include documentary film makers, entrepreneurs, social workers, political leaders and just about anyone with a story to tell.To mark this anniversary Lamb and his team at C-SPAN have assembled Sundays at Eight , a collection of the best unpublished interviews and stories from the last 25 years. Featured in this collection are historians like David McCullough, Ron Chernow and Robert Caro, reporters including April Witt, John Burns and Michael Weisskopf, and numerous others, including Christopher Hitchens, Brit Hume and Kenneth Feinberg.In a March 2001 Booknotes interview 60 Minutes creator Don Hewitt described the show's success this way: All you have to do is tell me a story." This collection attests to the success of that principle, which has guided Lamb for decades. And his guests have not disappointed, from the dramatic escape of a lifelong resident of a North Korean prison camp, to the heavy price paid by one successful West Virginia businessman when he won 314 million in the lottery, or the heroic stories of recovery from the most horrific injuries in modern-day warfare. Told in the series'signature conversational manner, these stories come to life again on the page. Sundays at Eight is not merely a token for fans of C-SPAN's interview programs, but a collection of significant stories that have helped us understand the world for a quarter-century.

A Miscellany for Word Lovers

By Robin Hosie, Vic Mayhew
Authors:
Robin Hosie, Vic Mayhew
More than 100 vocabulary-building quizzes make up the core of the book, with shorter sections on: * The fascinating origins of words * Quotes and misquotes* Slang, dialects and secret languages * Unforgettable Adverts, Famous Lines from Novels and Movies* Newspeak, Basic English, spelling reform* Malapropisms, politicians' blunders and 'mispeakings'* Mnemonics and other memory joggers* Palindromes and anagrams * Semaphore. Morse, tic-tac, hand gestures and other ways of speaking without wordsEntry after entry explores the byways, oddities and curiosities of the English language.
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Choose The Right Word

By Vic Mayhew, Robin Hosie
Authors:
Vic Mayhew, Robin Hosie
Whether applying for a job, writing a letter of complaint or simply talking with colleagues or friends, the people who get listened to are those with a confident command of language. Choose the Right Word is a fun guide to using English effectively and to avoiding common mistakes. It is both a valuable work of reference and an enjoyable read. While plotting a path through a minefield of rules and conventions, the book acknowledges that English is an ever-changing language and points out those rules that can at times be broken. 70 light-hearted quizzes show you how to use words that will make your point powerfully, and usage tips set you right on contextual issues. Curio Corners tell the fascinating stories behind dozens of everyday words and phrases. What's the difference between affect and effect; abjure and adjure? Does AD for Anno Domino come before or after the year - and the century? Should you write all right or alright; adviser or advisor? How did the word alcohol come into our language? Just how sure are you about your apostrophes?

Eat More of What You Love (QVC pbk)

By Marlene Koch
Authors:
Marlene Koch

Eat What You Love (QVC pbk)

By Marlene Koch
Authors:
Marlene Koch

Humblebrag

By Harris Wittels
Authors:
Harris Wittels
Something immediately annoyed writer Harris Wittels about Twitter. All of a sudden it was OK to brag, so long as those brags were ever-so-thinly masked in crappy, transparent humility. Once Harris identified this widespread issue, he decided to take action by naming this phenomenon and creating the twitter account called Humblebrag--solely dedicated to retweeting the humblebrags of others.Started less than a year ago, the Twitter feed is literally adding thousands of subscribers every day. A humblebrag, as defined by Harris, is a specific type of boast that allows the offender to broadcast their achievements without the necessary shame and guilt that should normally accompany such claims. Here are two examples: @JoshHighland tweets: "Just filed my taxes. Biggie was right, mo money mo problems."@glowyjoeybunny tweets: "I hate when I go into a store to get something to eat and the male staff are too busy hitting on me to get my order right :( so annoying!"Harris also shows us what humblebrags might look like from some of history's most notable names, as well as devoting an entire chapter to @TotesMcGotes, the greatest humblebraggart of them all.