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Twenty-Six Seconds

By Alexandra Zapruder
Authors:
Alexandra Zapruder
On November 22, 1963, Abraham Zapruder left his office hoping for a glimpse of President John F. Kennedy's motorcade as it passed by Dealey Plaza. A Russian Jewish immigrant who wholeheartedly loved his home in America, Abe thrilled at the chance to see the young president in person--and perhaps to bring back a home movie of this once-in-a-lifetime moment for his family. The twenty-six seconds of Abraham Zapruder's footage depicting the JFK assassination is now iconic, forever embedded in American culture and identity. The first major instance of citizen journalism, this amateur film forced Abraham Zapruder to face unprecedented dilemmas: How to handle his unexpected ownership of a vitally important yet unspeakably terrible piece of American history? How to aid the U.S. government and, at the same time, fend off the swarm of reporters grasping to purchase the film? How to make the best decisions to ensure the film was safeguarded--but never exploited? Now Abraham's granddaughter, Alexandra Zapruder, uses previously sealed archival sources, her family's personal records, and interviews to delve into the film's fraught history--its chance beginning, the frantic moments and crucial decisions following the assassination, its controversial ownership by LIFE Magazine, its use in the major assassination investigations, the persistent battles over control of the images, and its impact on American art, film, and literature. Zapruder traces issues of ownership, privacy, and ethics through the decades, as the film sparked debates on the public representation of violence, the media's role in disseminating information, and how personal property becomes public legacy. Throughout this complex history, Zapruder traces the intertwined lives of the film and her family, fusing the private and public to create a complete narrative of the Zapruder film for the first time. She shows how twenty-six seconds of footage changed her family and, at the same time, challenged American society, media, and culture, raising new questions that came to define our age.
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Lincoln's Notebooks

By Dan Tucker
Authors:
Dan Tucker
In addition to being one of the most admired and successful politicians in history, Abraham Lincoln was a gifted writer whose speeches, eulogies, and addresses are quoted often and easily recognized all around the world. The writings in this collection span from his early years in Indiana, to his time as a lawyer and a congressman in Illinois, to his final years in the White House. Arranged chronologically into topics such as family and friends, the law, politics and the presidency, story-telling, religion, and morality, Abraham Lincoln's Notebooks includes his famous letters to Ulysses S. Grant, Horace Greeley, and Henry Pierce as well as personal letters to Mary Todd Lincoln and his note to Mrs. Bixby, the mother who lost five sons during the Civil War. Also included are full texts of the Gettysburg Address, the Emancipation Proclamation, both of Lincoln's inaugural addresses, and his famous "A House Divided" speech. Rarely seen writings like poetry he composed as teenager, candid notes he left on the back of letters (sometimes displaying humor or even annoyance), and scraps of notes that he kept in the inside lining of his top hats (particularly during his years as a lawyer in Illinois) give insight into Lincoln's personality and private life.

Confidential Source Ninety-Six

By Roman Caribe, Rob Cea
Authors:
Roman Caribe, Rob Cea
C. S. 96 recounts the harrowing life he's lead as the most successful confidential informant in the history of U.S. law enforcement. A onetime mastermind narcotics distributor, C.S. 96 first saw the tragedies caused by the drug trade with his own eyes as he got to know the women involved with his business partner and the children that they raised. By the time C.S. 96 was arrested in a drug bust, he had made up his mind to get out of the business for good. Rather than beat the charges as his lawyer advised him to, he would confess, flip sides, and work for the federal government. He has spent the two decades since working for a web of federal agencies, leveraging inside information and connections gained while living his own criminal past to launch audacious operations that no other undercover agent would dream of. While projecting the swagger of a druglord, C.S. 96 get inside the minds of the gang and cartel leaders he goes toe to toe with. He becomes an actor risking everything to perform every night--one minor slip in his character and C.S. 96 and his family may disappear forever. And when leaders of Mexico's Sinalao Cartel that he was trying to ensnare tracked down C.S. 96's home and visited his wife and children there unannounced, he was forced to unroot them and confront the unthinkable dangers that he brought into their lives.Unfolding in Southern California mansions, makeshift DEA trailers set up in the middle of the Redwoods and the anonymous fast food parking lots where kilograms of cocaine and heroin changed hands, CS 96 is the epic saga of one man's quest to redeem himself in the eyes of his family and a thrilling, intimate look at the law enforcement battle that rages on beneath our noses.

Mandela, The Graphic Novel

By Umlando Wezithombe
Authors:
Umlando Wezithombe
Freedom fighter, fugitive, celebrated prisoner, president: the hero of a nation. Nelson Mandela was called a terrorist, forced into hiding, captured, threatened with the death penalty and eventually thrown into prison for 27 years, but nothing could stop him from fighting to liberate his country from the infamous sytem of apartheid, which for so many years sought to separate people by race in South Africa. A hero in the struggle, he never gave up. Even when he was a prisoner, he worked secretly with his comrades to undermine South Africa's oppressive government. This is the exciting, true story of a young herd-boy who grew up to become a lawyer, a figher for justice, South Africa's first democratically elected president and the beloved grandfather of a nation.

Rivals Unto Death

By Rick Beyer
Authors:
Rick Beyer
The day was hot and sticky. The man in the rowboat was an impetuous hothead. His row across the choppy Hudson that morning led to a confrontation that has burned bright in the American mind for more than two hundred years.When the most notorious duel in American history took place, Alexander Hamilton was 49, a former Treasury Secretary whose meteoric political rise had flamed out in the wake of a humiliating sex scandal. Vice President Aaron Burr, was just a year younger than Hamilton, at the top of a meteoric rise of his own in the nation's fledgling government. Though the duel is famous, the fascinating three-decade dance that led to it is far less known. Rivals Unto Death will explore that dance, vividly sketching the key episodes that led to its violent end. It will start with the preliminaries of that fateful morning in 1804, then retrace the rivalry back to the earliest days of the American Revolution, when both men, brilliant, restless, and barely twenty years old, elbowed their way onto the staff of General George Washington. It will follow them as they launch their competitive legal practices in New York City, the new country's bustling commercial center of thirty thousand people, through the insanity of the election of 1800, when Hamilton threw his support behind Thomas Jefferson in an effort to knock Burr out of the running for president, and through countless surprising moments in their past, such as when Burr saved Hamilton from capture and possible death at the hands of the British.Sharply realized and compellingly written, Rivals Unto Death transports readers to the era of Hamilton and Burr and explores how what was once considered the New World ended up being too small for the both of them.

The Contender

By Michael Shnayerson
Authors:
Michael Shnayerson
The story of Andrew Cuomo's political life reads like a novel and for the first time that story will be told in THE CONTENDER. In many ways, Cuomo's rise, fall and rise again is an iconic narrative: the story of the young American politician of vaunting ambition, aiming for nothing less than the presidency. Like many other politicians, Cuomo had to come back from seeming political death and reinvent himself. He did so, brilliantly, by running to become New York's attorney general and compiling a record of significant cases that focused on public corruption. He then ran for, and won, the governorship in 2010, promising to clean up America's most dysfunctional legislature. In THE CONTENDER Shnayerson also digs deep into Cuomo remains one of the country's most potent and impressive political leaders, about whom pundits tend to agree that the White House is not a question of whether, but when. With Cuomo's reelection this November, everyone is going to be buzzing that he is a rising star for 2016. We are publishing to capitalise on this national interest at what will be kickoff of the next Presidential election.
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Mandela

By Rod Green
Authors:
Rod Green
There can't be many people who have never heard of Nelson Mandela. His has become a household name, a name respected by everyone everywhere, from grandmothers to schoolchildren. Not so many people would recognise his other names, and he is a man who has been known by many names throughout his life. Nelson Rolihlahla Dalibhunga Mandela came from what most people would regard as a poor background, yet his family were aristocrats among the Xhosa people of the Transkei in South Africa. From the time he was a boy he was destined, as his father before him had been, to become an advisor at the court of the Xhosa king, but no one could have predicted that young Rolihlahla would one day become an outlaw known as 'The Black Pimpernel' or a statesman of international standing - President Mandela.This is a fully illustrated life story of Nelson Mandela with a unique collection of photographs from throughout his life.
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Rose Kennedy's Family Album

By Caroline Kennedy
Authors:
Caroline Kennedy
A selection of more than 400 photos collected by Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, most never seen before, featuring the beloved and revered Kennedy family: This remarkable history dates from 1878 through 1946 - up to the aftermath of WWII and the beginning of JFK's political career - and covers everything from the family's first home to beach vacations, from children's birthdays to first Communions. The images capture the formative years of a uniquely American dynasty, imparting a glowing nostalgia to the period and detailing the family's progress as it grows from a pair of turn-of-the-century newlyweds into a populous, vibrant clan of hopeful young men and women on the brink of their brilliant destinies. This is a piece of Americana that readers will treasure.

Five Chiefs

By John Paul Stevens
Authors:
John Paul Stevens
When he resigned in June 2010, Justice John Paul Stevens was the third-longest-serving Supreme Court justice in American history. As a lawyer and on the court, he worked with five chief justices: as a law clerk during Fred Vinson's tenure, a practicing lawyer when Earl Warren was chief, a circuit judge and junior justice during Warren Burger's term, a contemporary colleague of William Rehnquist, and a colleague of current Chief Justice John Roberts. FIVE CHIEFS is his personal account of the workings of the court from his personal experiences with these men, and the controversial cases they deliberated over, from freedom of speech and affirmative action to capital punishment and sovereign immunity. Written with humility and grace, and packed with interesting anecdotes, FIVE CHIEFS is an unprecedented and historically significant look at the highest court in the United States.

Our Sarah

By Chuck Heath, Sr., Chuck Heath, Jr.
Authors:
Chuck Heath, Sr., Chuck Heath, Jr.
From her early years in the Alaskan wilderness to the electrifying excitement of the campaign trail to her bright future as a star of the Tea Party movement, Sarah Palin's story is truly a remarkable one. In SARAH, her parents, siblings, best friends, college roommates, professional associates and many more open up like never before to reveal the heart and soul of the woman behind the podium. Through personal stories and photos dating back to her childhood, readers will see a side of Palin previously unknown. Friends and family will share the source of Palin's faith, determination and the persuasive powers that have been used to confront and win over her most vocal critics.Although Palin's early political heartache necessitated the growing of a thicker skin, she is still a woman of heart who loves her God, family, and country. SARAH is an insider's look at what makes one of the world's most recognized female leaders great
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Hester: The remarkable life of Dr Johnson's 'Dear Mistress'

By Ian McIntyre
Authors:
Ian McIntyre
Hester Salusbury was a child prodigy. Later, as Hester Thrale, her wit, learning and vivacity would attract the greats of the day, Joshua Reynolds, Fanny Burney, Boswell, David Garrick and Edmund Burke to the household at Streatham Park. She published to great popularity and acclaim on Johnson, irritating the hell out of Boswell, and remains one of our most perceptive sources. One of our first female historians, a feminist without knowing it, she also broke new ground in politics and business. When her husband died, rumours flew that she'd wed Johnson. Instead, she ran off with an Italian music teacher. The scandal consumed London society ­-- and her relationship with her daughters. But Hester was passionately in love (it was a love that nearly killed her). This is a brightly lit portrait of an exceptional woman whose life, loves and letters make a vivid and important contribution to our understanding of Georgian England.Praise for Ian McIntyre's Dirt & Deity: A Life of Robert Burns'If you read Burns, then buy this. If you don't read Burns, then start.' Economist'A shrewd, clear, comprehensive and wonderfully readable portrait of Burns as fallible man and gifted poet.' A.C. Grayling, Financial TimesFor Joshua Reynolds:'Stunning and richly entertaining...superlative. Philip Hensher, The Times.

Mary Seacole

By Jane Robinson
Authors:
Jane Robinson
The 'Greatest Black Briton in History' triumphed over the Crimea and Victorian England. "The Times" called her a heroine, Florence Nightingale called her a brothel-keeping quack, and Queen Victoria's nephew called her, simply, 'Mammy' - Mary Seacole was one of the most eccentric and charismatic women of her era. Born at her mother's hotel in Jamaica in 1805, she became an independent 'doctress' combining the herbal remedies of her African ancestry with sound surgical techniques. On the outbreak of the Crimean War, she arrived in London desperate to join Florence Nightingale at the Front, but the authorities refused to see her. Being black, nearly 50, rather stout, and gloriously loud in every way, she was obviously unsuitable. Undaunted, Mary travelled to Balaklava under her own steam to build the 'British Hotel', just behind the lines. It was an outrageous venture, and a huge success - she became known and loved by everyone from the rank and file to the royal family. For more than a century after her death this remarkable woman was all but forgotten. This, the first full-length biography of a Victorian celebrity recently voted the greatest black Briton in history, brings Mary Seacole centre stage at last.

Madame de Stael

By Maria Fairweather
Authors:
Maria Fairweather
The influence of the salons of Paris on the thought and culture of the eighteenth century would be difficult to overstate. They were both intellectual powerhouses and also assemblies where the latest and most extreme fashion was displayed. 'Young gallants...wearing silk waistcoats embroidered with Chinese pagodas, making love to ladies reclining negligently against the cushions...or accepting small cups of chocolate from the hands of Negro pages', thus Harold Nicolson describes the drawings of the time in his book "The Age of Reason". These meeting places for the vanguard of society were presided over by a succession of brilliantly clever women, the salonieres, and the most brilliant and clever of all of them was Madame de Stael. Although she died at the age of 51 she filled her life to the brim, and enjoyed a hugely influential role among the great names of the day. Born Germaine Necker, in Paris on 22 April 1766, her father was a powerful banker and her mother a Swiss pastor's daughter who never got over her good fortune in marrying a rich man. In 1786 Germaine was married to a secretary in the Swedish embassy called de Stael, but although she thought him 'a perfect gentleman' she also found him dull and clumsy. She began to take lovers - the Vicomte de Narbonne and possibly Talleyrand - and then Benjamin Constant, in whom she at last met her intellectual equal. In 1806 her novel "Delphine" was published. It was an instant success and praised by Goethe and Byron, among others. Her salon thronged with glittering visitors including The Tsar, Talleyrand,and Wellington. Maria Fairweather gives an entrancing account of this vanished world, so merciless to outsiders, but for those of the inner circle incomparably glamorous and exciting.
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