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  • Lucifer Falls

    By Colin Falconer
    Authors:
    Colin Falconer
    A killer stalks the streets of London . . . When a priest is found crucified in a derelict North London chapel, it makes a dramatic change for DI Charlie George and his squad at Essex Road. The brutal murder could not be further from their routine of domestic violence and stabbings on the estates. And that's only the beginning . . .On Christmas Eve, a police officer goes missing and his colleagues can't help but anticipate the worst. It turns out they're right to when eventually the body is found and they discover he's been stoned to death. As tensions rise, it's up to Charlie and his team to venture into the city's cold underbelly to try and find an answer to the madness . . . before anyone else dies a martyr's death.Praise for Colin Falconer:'Once you read [a] Colin Falconer [book], you'll want to read everything he's ever written' Crystal Book Reviews'Falconer's grasp of period and places is almost flawless ... He's my kind of writer' Peter Corris, TheAustralian'Falconer demonstrates exceptional characterisation' Bookgeeks
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    The Lies You Tell

    By B. E. Jones
    Authors:
    B. E. Jones
    The Secret History meets The Life and Loves of a She-Devil in a gripping thriller that subverts chick lit clichés in a trail of blood and jealousy. Friendship, freedom, booze, and student loans: the glory days of university. For Liz, Cora, Mike, and Stevie, students at Cardiff together, their circle was a surrogate family, bound together for three years in total trust. Or so it seemed. Post-graduation the group "stays in touch", with growing distance, but eventually reunite when Mike and Cora, now married, return to live in Cardiff. The foursome paint the town, marking Stevie's birthday in an orgy of nostalgia, when from nowhere, a beautiful - and younger - flame-haired girl appears. "Jenny" seems to recognise them, knows their names, but her identity's a total mystery to them all. Or so Liz and Cora think. But then Jenny reappears the next day, as a corpse found in the river . . . Foul play is presumed and Liz, a journalist, is assigned to cover the story. Before long she finds herself caught up in an expanding web of lies as Jenny's death is traced back to that fateful night between friends. And the ancient secrets of their college days begin to catch up with them all . . .~ Previously published as Telling Stories ~Praise for B. E. Jones'Claustrophobic and infused with menace. B. E. Jones creates a sinister world of secrets, twists and revelations' Alison Bruce'I got completely sucked in by this . . . irresistible!' Catriona McPherson'Bev Jones is a first class writer . . . I can thoroughly recommend this book' ***** Amazon Reviewer'A gripping summer must-read! Addictive!' ***** Amazon Reviewer'Twists and turns aplenty' ***** Amazon Reviewer
  • The Lies of Fair Ladies

    By Jonathan Gash
    Authors:
    Jonathan Gash
    Lovejoy has a new apprentice - the lovely, scatty and seriously rich Mrs Luna Carstairs. For Luna, Lovejoy is more than willing to give of his expertise in antiques, auctions and other, more intimate subjects. But just as things look to be getting rosy, a series of murders occur and the supply of antiques dries up. Behind it all lurks the threatening shadow of Miss R - a 'dollop broker', or harbourer of stolen booty - an evil genius who deals only with women. Trailing behind him an abandoned mistress and an assortment of police officers, Lovejoy must keep one step ahead of the law as he puzzles out the intricacies of his most complicated and potentially fatal case so far.Praise for Jonathan Gash: 'Irrepressible... bounteous entertainment' Sunday Times'Lovejoy is up to his old tricks again... compelling stuff' Today'Unabashedly amoral, witty and crammed with treasures of every sort... Pure, unadulterated Lovejoy' Publishers Weekly
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    Lucky Man

    By Greg Lake
    Authors:
    Greg Lake
    Greg Lake first won acclaim as lead vocalist, bass guitarist and producer when, together with Robert Fripp, he formed King Crimson. Their first album, the landmark In the Court of the Crimson King, co-produced by Greg, featured the iconic song '21st Century Schizoid Man'. King Crimson pioneered progressive rock and paved the way for many famous bands that followed, from Yes and Genesis to the Red Hot Chilli Peppers.In 1970 Greg met fellow legend Keith Emerson during a North American tour; the two shared common bonds: European musical influences and a desire to reinterpret classical works while creating a new musical genre. After being introduced to drummer Carl Palmer, they formed the first progressive rock supergroup Emerson, Lake and Palmer.To date ELP has sold over 50 million records. Lake produced Emerson, Lake & Palmer, Tarkus, Pictures at an Exhibition, Trilogy, Brain Salad Surgery, Works Vol. 1 and 2, and two different live albums. All went platinum and featured a series of hit singles, most written and all sung by Lake. The three created a unique live theatrical performance which featured Emerson attacking his keyboards with knives, Palmer playing a 2.5 ton stainless steel kit and Lake performing on a £6,000 Persian rug which had its own roadie. One of their very first performances was at the historic Isle of Wight Festival in 1970 and they went on to headline California Jam, one of the biggest concerts of the 1970s, attended by 350,000 people.Probably the voice of his generation, Greg fronted the greatest rock supergroup of the 1970s but never held with the 'progressive' tag that attached itself to both the music and the excess. Lucky Man not only charts the highs and lows of a career in rock music but also reflects on the death of Keith Emerson last year, living with terminal cancer and the end of life. Greg can best be summed up by his now-famous line: 'Material wealth is a very fleeting pleasure ... when you can buy anything you want and do anything you want, you soon discover that you actually don't want any of it.'
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    Ludo and the Power of the Book

    By Richard Ingrams
    Authors:
    Richard Ingrams
    'Stirring' Roger Lewis, Daily Mail, BOOK OF THE WEEK'A warm and worthy tribute' The Times'Elegantly written, thought-provoking' The Lady'A lucid and affectionate portrait of one of the great journalists of his day' ObserverSir Ludovic Kennedy was a British journalist, television personality, humanist and author. Following a brief naval career, Ludo devoted his life to what he referred to as his 'lifelong obsession with miscarriages of justice' and he fought this cause tirelessly, until he died in 2009. He is best known for re-examining cases such as the kidnapping of American toddler Charles Lindbergh, about which he wrote his most ambitious book on injustice, The Airman and the Carpenter. Ludo's writings and work on other cases such as the murder convictions of Timothy Evans and Derek Bentley were unique in that they often dispelled the breeding ground for conspiracy theories and regularly heralded dramatic changes of public opinion. Ludo is considered to be hugely influential in the abolition of the death penalty in the UK as well as other legal reforms, most notably the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (1984) which obligated police to tape-record the questioning of suspects. His life story is one that deserves to be remembered and celebrated.Richard Ingrams first met Ludovic Kennedy in 1963 and the pair quickly bonded over their shared goal of exposing the fallible nature of the British justice system. Ingrams interweaves this biography with detailed analysis of the cases to which Ludo dedicated his life, vividly recapturing the spirit of his friend and colleague.
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    Lucky Lupin

    By Charlie Mortimer
    Authors:
    Charlie Mortimer
    Lucky Lupin is a poignant yet light-hearted story of survival against the odds, based on Charlie Mortimer's life with HIV/Aids during the early years (1984-1996), when there was neither treatment nor cure. Using a combination of good luck, gallows humour, Fray Bentos pies and copious quantities of Solpadeine, Charlie survived not only the illness but the hysteria that accompanied the so-called 'gay plague'. Anyone infected became a social pariah; had the local launderette got word of his illness they wouldn't have washed his sheets but burnt them. Whilst taking full responsibility for the consequences of his behaviour - 'The fact is you don't get AIDS from watching telly' - Charlie initially took to the sofa and prepared for death, but, in time, he found the inner strength required to confront his fatal diagnosis, becoming, among other things, an antiques dealer and contemporary art collector.With blistering and often hilarious candour Charlie also recounts his childhood where he developed a passion for cars, cultivated by his adventurous mother 'Nidnod', his dizzying array of careers and somewhat curious domestic arrangements including the 'adoption' of a bank robber for twelve years. He also confronts head on his experiences of coming to terms with confused sexuality, addiction, epilepsy and clinical depression before finding lasting contentment.Praise for Dear Lupin:'As well as being the funniest book I've read in ages, it's also extremely touching. A delight then, on every front.' The Spectator 'Very, very funny.' Sunday Times'Wry, trenchant, often extremely funny, but also charmingly forbearing and forgiving.' Country Life
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    A Life in Football: My Autobiography

    By Ian Wright
    Authors:
    Ian Wright
    THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER'Wrighty's characteristic honesty means his book is far more engrossing than most bland football memoirs' Sunday TimesIan Wright, Arsenal legend, England striker and TV pundit extraordinaire, is one of the most interesting and relevant figures in modern football.His journey from a South London council estate to national treasure is everybody's dream. From Sunday morning football directly to Crystal Palace; from 'boring, boring Arsenal' to inside the Wenger Revolution; from Saturday afternoons on the pitch to Saturday evenings on primetime television; from a week in prison to inspiring youth offenders, Ian will reveal all about his extraordinary life and career.Ian will also frankly discuss how retirement affects footballers, why George Graham deserves a statue, social media, why music matters, breaking Arsenal's goal-scoring record, racism, the unadulterated joy of playing alongside Dennis Bergkamp and, of course, what he thinks of Tottenham.Not a standard footballer's autobiography, Ian Wright's memoir is a thoughtful and gripping insight into a Highbury Hero and one of the greatest sports stars of recent years.
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  • The Lanimer Bride

    By Pat McIntosh
    Authors:
    Pat McIntosh
    How could the heavily-pregnant bride of the lanimer-man vanish into thin air?Young Mistress Audrey Madur is missing and her husband, responsible for maintaining boundaries and overseeing land use in the burgh of Lanark, is strangely reluctant to search for her.Gil Cunningham, answering the frantic appeal of Audrey's mother, finds himself searching the burgh and the lands round about, questioning family and neighbours. He and Alys uncover disagreements, feuds, adultery and murder, and encounter once again the flamboyant French lady Olympe Archibecque, who is not at all what she seems.And then another lady goes missing . . .Praise for Pat Macintosh:'Will do for Glasgow in the fifteenth century what Ellis Peters and her Brother Cadfael did for Shrewsbury in the twelfth' Mystery Reader's Journal.
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  • The Lazarus Curse

    By Tessa Harris
    Authors:
    Tessa Harris
    The 18th-century meets the sharp blade of forensic science...In 1780s London, American anatomist Dr. Thomas Silkstone is plunged into a swirling cauldron of sorcery, slavery, and cold-blooded murder...When the sole survivor of an ill-fated scientific expedition to Jamaica goes missing upon his return to London, Dr Thomas Silkstone - entrusted with cataloging the expedition's New World specimens - feels compelled to investigate. There are rumours of a potion that has the power to raise the dead - and the formula is suspected to be in the private journal that has disappeared along with the young botanist. As Dr Silkstone searches for clues to the man's whereabouts, he is drawn deeper into a dark and dangerous world of vengeance, infidelity, murder and the trafficking of corpses for profit. Without the support of his beloved Lady Lydia Farrell - from whom he has been forcibly separated by law - he must confront the horrors of slavery, as well the very depths of human wickedness. And after a headless corpse is discovered, Dr. Silkstone begins to uncover the sinister motives of those in power who would stop at nothing to possess the Lazarus potion...Praise for Tessa Harris:'A densely plotted yarn about a crafty 18th-century poisoner wreaking havoc on the Oxfordshire estate of a noble family . . . we await - indeed, demand - the sequel' New York Times Book Review'Harris' research is meticulous. The results are a historical CSI with a romance and excellent mystery' Romantic Times'Populated with real historical characters and admirably researched, Harris's novel features a complex and engrossing plot' Library Journal'The author will have you flipping the pages at each unexpected turn in the plot. The novel is an absorbing read with a shocking twist at the end' Historical Novel Society'Well-rounded characters, cleverly concealed evidence, and an assured prose style point to a long run for this historical series' Publishers Weekly Starred Review'The exceptionally strong historical background in this 1780s London-set novel makes it impossible to put down. With each book, the mysteries have become stronger . . . Silkstone is an admirable character and he captures readers' emotional interest' RT Book ReviewsThe Dr Thomas Silkstone Mysteries:The Anatomist's ApprenticeThe Dead Shall Not RestThe Devil's BreathThe Lazarus CurseShadow of the RavenSecrets in the Stones
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    Living in the Sound of the Wind

    By Jason Wilson
    Authors:
    Jason Wilson
    W. H. Hudson was brought up on the pampas, where he learnt from gauchos about frontier life. After moving to London in 1874, Hudson lived in extreme poverty. Like his friend Joseph Conrad, Hudson was an exile, adapting to England. He never returned to Argentina.Wilson unravels Hudson's English dream, his natural history rambles, and his work to protect birds. He remains both a complex witness to his homeland before mass immigration and to his England of the mind, before the urban sprawl.Praise for Jason Wilson: Tireless, shrewd, erudite Jason Wilson, mixing hard fact and anthology, provides the perfect outfit of allusion and comparative experience - Jonathan Keates, ObserverPut his treasure trove into your pocket. - Anthony Sattin, Sunday TimesThe idea is so simple that it must be original. This inaugural book might prove to be a landmark. - Nicholas Shakespeare, Daily Telegraph
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  • The Last Illusion

    By Rhys Bowen
    Authors:
    Rhys Bowen
    Irish immigrant and private detective Molly Murphy is thrilled to have a ticket to see world-famous illusionist Harry Houdini. But before he can even take the stage, the opening act goes horribly wrong - and the sensational Signor Scarpelli's lovely assistant is sawed in half. In the aftermath, Scarpelli accuses Houdini of tampering with his equipment. Who else but the so-called Handcuff King could have got a hold of his trunk of tricks, which he keeps under lock and key?And it seems the maestro Scarpelli's not the only one critical of Houdini. Now that he's raised the stakes to such a perilous level, lesser acts are being put out of business. With everyone on edge, Houdini's wife hires Molly to watch his back. But how can she protect a man who literally risks his life every night? Now it's up to Molly to keep an eye on Houdini and find out whether these masters of illusion are simply up to their tricks - or if there truly is something much more treacherous going on...'Delightful... as ever, Bowen does a splendid job of capturing the flavour of early twentieth-century New York and bringing to life its warm and human inhabitants.' Publishers Weekly'Molly grows ever more engaging against a vibrant background of New York's dark side at the turn of the century.' Kirkus Reviews
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  • London Calling

    By Sara Sheridan
    Authors:
    Sara Sheridan
    1952, Brighton and London. When seventeen-year-old debutante Rose Bellamy Gore goes missing in a seedy Soho jazz club the prime suspect is black saxophone player, Lindon Claremont, the last person seen talking to her. Under suspicion, Lindon heads straight for Brighton and his childhood friend, Vesta Churchill who works with ex-Whitehall backroom girl Mirabelle Bevan, now in charge of McGuigan & McGuigan debt recovery. When Lindon is taken into custody the two women dive into London's underworld of smoky night clubs, smart cars and lethal cocktails to establish the truth.
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    The Last Goodbye

    By Matt Potter
    Authors:
    Matt Potter
    History is written by the winners. It's the faithful servants, the insiders, the ones who stick around, who can adapt to almost any condition that get to write the official histories. They publish the memoirs, park in the directors' spots, erect the statues, form the new governments, wipe out the pockets of resistance, recruit the new starters, set the agendas, talk on the documentaries and retrospectives. Yet theirs - the official version - is never the whole story. The quitter's tale offers a far more compelling, and often a more honest version of history. The Last Goodbye, Matt Potter collects the pithiest, angriest, most hilarious messages of resignation throughout history, including those whose exits were a springboard to eventual success, such as Steve Jobs, George Orwell and Charlie Sheen.It's full of self-deception, bloody knives, betrayal, honour, disgrace, disgust, thwarted ambition and shattered hopes, and sometimes a wicked sting in the tail . . .
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    The Lost

    By Jonathan Aycliffe
    Authors:
    Jonathan Aycliffe
    British born Michael Feraru, scion of a long line of Romanian aristocrats, leaves his country of birth and his love, to reclaim his heritage - a Draculian castle deep in the heart of Transylvania. He plans to turn his inheritance into an orphanage in the new post-Ceausescu, post-communist country. There he enlists the help of a young local lawyer, Liliana Popescu, to search for the missing Feraru millions, and battle through the complex maze of old bureaucracy in the scam-rich, newly-born state.Feraru describes his journey into the heart of the Romanian countryside, wasted by years of neglect and caught in a time-warp, as though the twentieth century had never reached it. When he eventually arrives at his inheritance, he finds the castle of the Ferarus, in a sunless valley in the Carpathian Mountains, is home to much more than memories...Aycliffe conjures a feeling of dread that deepens with each unsettling incident.'TIME OUT'Aycliffe has a fine touch.'INDEPENDENT'Should ultimately be ranked among the greats.'INTERZONE'There are echoes of the great ghost writer of them all, Edgar Allan Poe, in the poised and elegant bookishness of the prose.'SCOTSMAN'Sends chills down the spine. Read him and you'll never forget him.'YORKSHIRE GAZETTE
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    The Lunatics Have Taken Over the Asylum

    By Ian Hollingshead
    Authors:
    Ian Hollingshead
    Telegraph letter writers, that most astute body of political commentators, are probably not alone in thinking that politics has taken some strange turns in recent years. The first coalition government since 1945 has led the country from the subprime to the ridiculous, lumbering from Leveson to Libya, riots to referendums, pasty-gate to pleb-gate, Brooks to Bercow, the Bullingdon Club to the Big Society.Five years is a long time in politics. Fortunately for us, it has also been a most fertile period for the Telegraph's legion of witty and erudite letter writers, who have their own therapeutic way of dealing with the pain. An institution in their own right, theirs is a welcome voice of sanity in a world in which the lunatics appear finally to have taken over the asylum.
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  • The Love Match

    By M.C. Beaton
    Authors:
    M.C. Beaton
    By day she champions women's rights but by night she plots romance! No young lady can be more devoted to the teachings of the infamous blue stocking Mrs Waverley than Felicity, her adopted author. Yet Felicity leads a secret life: that of an author of a scandalous new novel - the tale of a lady "rake" and her passionate exploits. Yet there is one titled gentleman who is intrigued with this mysterious, headstrong young woman who is taking Society by storm -- and Felicity soon learns that real life is infinitely more interesting than fiction!
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  • The Last Kashmiri Rose

    By Barbara Cleverly
    Authors:
    Barbara Cleverly
    It is India 1922 and the wives of officers in the Bengal Greys have been dying violently, one each year and always in March. The only link between the bizarre but apparently accidental deaths is the bunches of small red roses that appear on the women's graves.When a fifth wife is found with her wrists cut in a bath of blood the Govenor rejects the verdict of suicide and calls in Joe Sandilands, an ex-soldier and Scotland Yard Detective. It becomes clear to Joe that the deaths are, indeed, a series of murders and they are have not yet run their course.Who will be the recipient of the next - and last - Kashmiri Roses? As he discovers the shocking truth Joe must work fast to unmask a killer whose motives are rooted in the dark history of India itself.
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    The Last Assassin

    By Daniel Easterman
    Authors:
    Daniel Easterman
    In an Iranian suburb, seven men meet a macabre and voluntary death. They choose to die rather than be captured and interrogated, leaving only one mysterious clue to their identities and mission. Seven more immediately take their place, to carry out the task of assassinating seven rulers, including the U.S. President. One thing stands in their way, CIA agent Peter Randall.

    The Lost Sock

    By Gillian Johnson
    Authors:
    Gillian Johnson
    When a man loses one of his favourite pair of socks at the laundromat, he sets out on a quest to find out what happens to lost socks, and why every sock drawer contains a plethora of single socks. On his eventful journey, he discovers why you always lose the sock you love, visits a sockiatrist who teaches him about the Planet of Lost Socks, and eventually finds his perfect partner at a puppet show. A wryly sweet story of love, loss and destiny.
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    The Living Years

    By Mike Rutherford
    Authors:
    Mike Rutherford
    "Now Michael, you're the son of a naval officer, you must behave like a naval officer at all times..."What Captain William Rutherford told his seven-year-old son Michael was to stay with him all his life. Born in 1950, Michael was truly his father's son, even serving in the naval section of the student cadet corps at one of England's top public schools, Charterhouse. Mike's future lay in the civil service: it was a subject that he discussed with his father at Captain Crawford's gentlemen's club. But then something happened. Mike discovered rock music. As one of the founder members of Genesis, Mike was to tour the world and achieve international fame. From unpromising beginnings - demonised by his teachers as a fomenter of revolution, driving to gigs in a bread van - Mike would go on to crisscross the globe with bandmates Peter Gabriel and, later, Phil Collins, playing to packed-out stadiums and achieving record sales of over 150 million. Swapping old school ties and Savile Row suits for flares and Afghan coats, Mike and Genesis would pioneer the pomp and theatricality of 1970s progressive rock before becoming household names in the 1980s with hits like Turn It On Again, Mama and Land of Confusion. There was drink, there were drugs; there were arguments and excess. But, in the background - and sometimes in the audience - there was also the loyal Captain Rutherford, earplugs at the ready, Melody Maker in hand. A proud father still.The Living Years spans the entire history of Genesis, from the earliest days as a school band to the triumphant 2007 reunion tour when Genesis played to over 500,000 people in Rome. But this is not just another rock 'n' roll memoir. This is also a book about two men whose lives and complex relationship reflect the seismic social and cultural shifts that took place during the twentieth century. A book for every father and son.
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