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  • The Killing Connection

    By T.F. Muir
    Authors:
    T.F. Muir
    How well do you know the person you love? A woman's body is washed up on the rocks by the castle ruins in St Andrews with evidence of strangulation, and no ID. Two days into the case, a call from another woman claiming to be the victim's friend could be DCI Andy Gilchrist's first solid lead. But when she fails to turn up for an interview, Gilchrist fears the worst. The next day, they find her battered body. Gilchrist's focus centres on his prime suspect, a local handyman with the reputation of being a ladies' man, who seems to have no history beyond three years - the length of time he's been living in the East Neuk. But before Gilchrist can bring him in for questioning, he vanishes. Would you trust the person you love with your life? If you do, they might just take it.Praise for T.F. Muir:'A truly gripping read.' Mick Herron'Everything I look for in a crime novel.' Louise Welsh'Rebus did it for Edinburgh. Laidlaw did it for Glasgow. Gilchrist might just be the bloke to put St Andrews on the crime fiction map.' Daily Record'Gripping and grisly, with plenty of twists and turns that race along with black humour.' Craig Robertson'Muir exposes the dark underbelly of a well-heeled university town with knuckle-gnawing tension, whipcrack plot twists and grisly set-pieces shot through with black humour.' Neil Broadfoot
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  • Kill Switch

    By James Phelan
    Authors:
    James Phelan
    'Jed Walker is right there in Reacher's rear-view mirror.' Lee ChildJed Walker has 48 hours to save the world.The countdown has begun ...The world is under cyber attack. The secretive terror outfit, known as Zodiac, are preparing to unleash chaos. The options for the hackers are endless. From massive data breaches, take-downs of critical infrastructure, and commandeering military hardware, nothing networked is safe. Knowing where they will strike is half the battle. The only thing certain is their intent to create a devastating global catastrophe. The US President has the power to enact the Internet Freedom Act - the 'Kill Switch'. Turning off the Net will stop the attacks. But it's not that simple. The US will plummet into pandemonium if electronic communications cease. The rest of the world will follow. One man, ex-CIA operative Jed Walker, has 36 hours to stop the terrorists. But for Jed, Zodiac isn't the only thing he has to worry about. To protect the future he must reconnect with a woman from his past. No matter which way he turns, he has tough choices to make. Not everyone will get out alive. For Walker the countdown starts now . . .Praise for James Phelan:'James Phelan has produced a big, juicy, rollicking tale in the spirit of Robert Ludlum. We haven't seen an international thriller like this for a long time' Jeffery Deaver'A fast and furious ride through a complicated maze of timely political intrigue. James Phelan has earned a new avid fan' Steve Berry'A corker ... Phelan writes in swift, gritty prose, never wasting a word. An espionage novel with grunt.' Sydney Morning Herald
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    Knowing the Score

    By David Papineau
    Authors:
    David Papineau
    'A tour de force that provides fresh insight not only into the nature of sport, but cooperation, the mind, altruism, teamwork, leadership, tribalism and ritualism. It's a book that every sports fan should read, and every sports writer should absorb' Matthew Syed'David Papineau's book is an important contribution to our thinking about sports, society, psychology, and moral philosophy. But it is also much more than that. Gripping from start to finish, it is a terrific read full of humour and good sense. You don't even have to like sports to enjoy it' Ian BurumaWhy do sports competitors choke? How can Roger Federer select which shot to play in 400 milliseconds? Should foreign-born footballers be eligible to play for England? Why do opposing professional cyclists help each other? Why do American and European golfers hate each other? Why does test cricket run in families? Why is punching tolerated in rugby but not in soccer?These may not look like philosophical questions, but David Papineau shows that under the surface they all raise long-standing philosophical issues. To get to the bottom of these and other sporting puzzles, we need help from metaphysics or ethics, or from the philosophy of mind or political philosophy, as well as numerous other philosophical disciplines. Knowing the Score will be an entertaining, fact-filled and erudite book that ranges far and wide through the sporting world. As a prominent philosopher who is also an enthusiastic amateur sportsman and omnivorous sports fan, David Papineau is uniquely well-placed to show how philosophy can illuminate sporting issues. By bringing his philosophical expertise to bear, he will add a new dimension to the way we think about sport.
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  • A Killer Ball at Honeychurch Hall

    By Hannah Dennison
    Authors:
    Hannah Dennison
    In this delightful new mystery our heroine Kat Stanford stumbles upon a hidden room in an abandoned wing at Honeychurch Hall.However, Kat's initial excitement soon ends in horror. There, lying on the cold, stone floor, Kat comes across the body of a young woman dressed in an Egyptian toga and wearing a tawdry fairground trinket around her broken neck. Suspicion falls on some of those who live at the Hall - both upstairs and down - and even those who are just had been passing through. Matters come to a head as a killer lurks amid the aristocracy . . . Downton Abbey fans will want more Killer Balls at Honeychurch Hall.Praise for Hannah Dennison:The perfect classic English village mystery but with the addition of charm, wit and a thoroughly modern touch. (Rhys Bowen)Downton Abbey was yesterday. Murder at Honeychurch Hall lifts the lid on today's grand country estate in all its tarnished, scheming, inbred, deranged glory. (Catriona McPherson)A fun read (Carola Dunn)Sparkles like a glass of Devon cider on a summer afternoon. (Elizabeth Duncan)
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  • The King's Corrodian

    By Pat McIntosh
    Authors:
    Pat McIntosh
    'The tale seems very improbable,' Gil Cunningham said. 'How should the Devil enter a religious house and carry off one of its members?'How indeed? But Arnold Fleming, the widely dislike pensioner, or corrodian, lodged in the Dominican's house in Perth, has vanished from a chamber, and a local knight and his mistress claim to have seen the Devil abroad that very same night. Three of the friars are accused by their fellows of involvement, documents found in Fleming's lodgings suggest he was blackmailing somebody, and when Gil is called in to investigate, he reveals theft, ancient murder - and more recent secrets.Then a body turns up - then a second one. Are these deaths connected to Fleming's disappearance, or to the victim of his blackmailing activities? Gil's questioning uncovers some of the truth, but it is Alys who discovers the answer, with the help of the Dominicans' redoubtable lay-brothers and the priory kitchens.Praise for Pat Macintosh:'Will do for Glasgow in the fifteenth century what Ellis Peters and her Brother Cadfael did for Shrewsbury in the twelfth.' Mystery Reader's Journal.
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    K

    By Daniel Easterman
    Authors:
    Daniel Easterman
    It is wartime and John Ridgeforth has been smuggled, his mission deadly secret, into a country which he thought he knew, thought he loved. It is a country where public lynchings are condoned; where concentration camps are rife; where neighbour spies on neighbour, and lovers are dangerous enemies; where Jews, Blacks, Communists are branded with the letter K. A country where K stands for kike; and for the Ku Klux Klan. K carries us into a nightmare world which is also uncannily close to truth and our worst fears, most haunting dreads. We have seen fanaticism; now we see what could so easily have been all our yesterdays.

    Kitchener

    By John Pollock
    Authors:
    John Pollock
    This enlightening biography, drawing on both official accounts and private letters, re-establishes Kitchener's reputation as a hero of the British Empire.When the Great War broke out, Kitchener, with the foresight lacking in many of his contemporaries, insisted that it would last at least three years and that he must raise an army of 3 million men. This began with an immediate recruitment of 100,000 volunteers, and the familiar poster campaign image of him with the line "Your country needs you".Major battles and initiatives of the Great War are recreated in a dramatic narrative history which does justice to Kitchener's masterly planning. This superb double volume biography will transform our view of Kitchener and the First World War.

    Kiwi Wars

    By Garry Douglas Kilworth
    Authors:
    Garry Douglas Kilworth
    This is a thrilling new military adventure for Captain Jack Crossman.Captain 'Fancy Jack' Crossman has been sent to New Zealand, where the Maori Wars are in progress. His remit is to map the bush country and to set up a network of spies. During conflict he finds that the Maori are an honourable and formidable enemy. However, nefarious Europeans are at work, enriching themselves as land agents.Jack becomes entangled with one of these agents, the brother of his lifetime burden Private Harry Wynter, and is in danger of being sucked down into a morass of evil affairs. When the final revelation comes, Jack realises just how heinous these crimes are, and he must hunt down and destroy these monstrous elements...

    Kasztner's Train

    By Anna Porter
    Authors:
    Anna Porter
    The true, heart-wrenching story of Rezsö Kasztner, a Hungarian lawyer and journalist, who rescued thousands of Jews during the last days of the Second World War - and the ultimate price he paid.Summer 1944 - Rezsö Kasztner meets with Adolf Eichmann, architect of the Holocaust, in Budapest. With the Final Solution at its terrible apex and tens of thousands of Hungarian Jews being sent to Auschwitz every month, the two men agree to allow 1,684 Jews to leave for Switzerland by train. The wealthy Jews of Budapest will pay an average of $1,500 for each family member to be included; the poor will pay nothing.In addition to those on the train, Kasztner negotiates with Eichmann to keep 20,000 Hungarian Jews alive - Eichmann called them 'Kasztner's Jews' or the 'Jews on ice' - for a deposit of approximately $100 per head. These deals would haunt Kasztner to the end of his life.After the war, Kasztner was vilified in an infamous Israeli libel trial for having 'sold his soul to the devil' in collaborating with the Nazis. In 1957, he was murdered while he awaited the Supreme Court verdict that eventually vindicated him.Kasztner's Train explores the nature of Kasztner: the cool hero, the proud Zionist, the man who believed that promises, even to the Nazis, had to be kept. The deals he made raise questions about moral choices that continue to haunt the world today.
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    The Korean War

    By Brian Catchpole
    Authors:
    Brian Catchpole
    Truman was reluctant to intervene, but two weeks later a UN resolution was passed setting up a unified command under the blue flag under General MacArthur. Thus began the struggle which did not end until the armistice in 1953. In this book Brian Catchpole recounts the military operations - the slogging war on the ground as well as the UN naval superiority and the importance of air power. He also explains the diplomatic background of international relations between China and the West, the communist propaganda in the north, the issue of prisoners-of-war, the talks leading to the armistice and the creation of the demilitarized zone. The war enabled the UN to act in an official capacity to defend a state under military attack - the only time during the Cold War it did so. But it did not enhance the reputation of the UN for resolving international disputes.
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