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I Did It for Us

By Alison Bruce
Authors:
Alison Bruce
'Unpredictable, challenging and compelling' Sophie HannahFrom the first time I saw them together I knew it felt wrong. I didn't like the way he touched her or the self-conscious way he played with Molly and Luke. Joanne saw none of it of course. So I did it to prove to her that she was wrong. I did it for us.Emily's instincts tell her that best friend Joanne's new boyfriend is bad news. Emily fears for Joanne. Fears for Joanne's children. But Joanne won't listen because she's in love. So Emily watches, and waits . . . and then she makes a choice. But Emily has a past, and secrets too. And is she really as good a friend to Joanne as she claims?'Never before have I read such a compelling, chilling read that kept me intrigued from beginning to end . . . If you adore psychological thrillers and books such as The Girl on the Train, then this is a must read!' Red Headed Book Lover Blog 'I Did It For Us held me from the off. It's compelling, slickly plotted and brilliantly written' Amanda Jennings
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  • In Prior's Wood

    By G.M. Malliet
    Authors:
    G.M. Malliet
    Newly returned from investigating a murder in Monkslip-super-Mare, handsome Max Tudor wants nothing more than to settle back into his predictable routine as vicar of St. Edwold's Church in the village of Nether Monkslip. But the flow of his sermon on Bathsheba is interrupted when the lady of the local manor house is found in a suicide pact with her young lover.Lady Duxter's husband rallies quickly from the double tragedy - too quickly, it is murmured in the village. Lord Duxter has already offered his manor house to a motley crew of writers, including Max's wife Awena, for his writers' retreat, and he insists the show must go on.But when a young girl goes missing and a crime writer becomes a target, DCI Cotton asks Max to lend his MI5 expertise to the investigation.Many suspects emerge as the scope of the investigation widens beyond the writers to villagers who had crossed swords with the insufferably smug crime author. But Max begins to wonder: was the attack on the writer only part of a broader conspiracy of silence?Praise for G. M. Malliet:'G.M. Malliet has brought the village cosy into the twenty first century.' Charles Todd'There are certain things you want in a village mystery: a pretty setting, a tasteful murder, an appealing sleuth... Malliet delivers all that.' New York Times Book Review'G. M. Malliet has crafted the English village of our dreams.' Charlaine Harris
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  • In Strangers' Houses

    By Elizabeth Mundy
    Authors:
    Elizabeth Mundy
    There are some crimes you can't sweep under the carpet...Lena Szarka, a Hungarian cleaner working in London, knows all too well about cleaning up other people's messes. When her friend Timea disappears, she suspects one of her clients is to blame. However, the police don't share her suspicions and it is left to Lena to turn sleuth and find her friend. Searching through their houses as she scrubs their floors, Lena desperately tries to find out what has happened. Only Cartwright, a police constable new to the job, believes that this will lead to the truth - and together they begin to uncover more of Islington's seedy underbelly than they bargained for. But Lena soon discovers it's not just her clients who have secrets. And as she begins to unravel Timea's past she starts to wonder if she really knew her friend at all.Praise for Elizabeth Mundy:'Terrific and heartwarming; a charming debut' Daisy Waugh'A warmly-crafted crime debut, perfect for our multicultural age' Vaseem Khan'I loved In Strangers' Houses - poignant, funny and races effortlessly along. Lena is a wonderfully unusual heroine and I can't wait for her next adventure' Elodie Harper'Lena's tenacity and common sense illuminate this engaging story' Daily Mail'Beautiful writing, a fine debut' The Sun
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    I Had to Survive

    By Dr. Roberto Canessa, Pablo Vierci
    Authors:
    Dr. Roberto Canessa, Pablo Vierci
    On 12 October 1972, a Uruguayan Air Force plane carrying members of the 'Old Christians' rugby team (and many of their friends and family members) crashed into the Andes mountains. I Had to Survive offers a gripping and heartrending recollection of the harrowing brink-of-death experience that propelled survivor Roberto Canessa to become one of the world's leading paediatric cardiologists.Canessa, a second-year medical student at the time, tended to his wounded teammates amidst the devastating carnage of the wreck and played a key role in safeguarding his fellow survivors, eventually trekking with a companion across the hostile mountain range for help.This fine line between life and death became the catalyst for the rest of his life.This uplifting tale of hope and determination, solidarity and ingenuity gives vivid insight into a world famous story. Canessa also draws a unique and fascinating parallel between his work as a doctor performing arduous heart surgeries on infants and unborn babies and the difficult life-changing decisions he was forced to make in the Andes. With grace and humanity, Canessa prompts us to ask ourselves: what do you do when all the odds are stacked against you?
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    It's One For The Money

    By Clinton Heylin
    Authors:
    Clinton Heylin
    Song publishing is the one constant in the carousel of recorded music now spanning the past century, and has been the way that song-credits and publishing revenue have caused ructions and recriminations, and inspired writers by making them poor and lawyers rich. Whether it be Procul Harum going to court to decide who really wrote 'Whiter Shade of Pale' or the Moody Blues wanting their fair share of 'Nights of White Satin', when the song-credits get divvied up, a parting of the ways citing 'musical differences' is almost inevitable. So here are some choice examples of poplore held up to the light,some familiar to music fans others not, designed to prove that Dylan knew of what he wrote when he suggested, 'Money doesn't talk, it swears'. Between them, they provide the unvarnished story of popular song from the days jukeboxes and radio replaced wax cylinders and piano rolls to the era of digital downloads, legal and illegal...
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    I'll Tell You What...

    By Robbie Savage
    Authors:
    Robbie Savage
    'A brilliant take on the modern game - Robbie tells it like it is' Rio FerdinandRobbie Savage is one of Britain's most recognisable football pundits. Incisive, forthright and bold, Savage never holds back where the beautiful game is concerned.No Premier League footballer has ever divided opinion quite like Robbie Savage. Mr Marmite, as he was often known (among other things), rampaged his way through almost 350 games in the Premier League and along the way picked up more yellow cards than Gary Lineker has crisps and more enemies than Joey Barton and Neil Warnock put together.In his explosive new book, I'll Tell You What..., Savage lifts the lid on all aspects of the modern game. Managers, players, the Premiership, the European game, the FA Cup, kids' football, and pushy football parents are just a few of the topics that Savage takes on in his inimitable provocative style.Robbie tells us why:* Brian Clough, not Sir Alex Ferguson, is the best Manager the world has ever known· * As a player, he would have complimented any one of Jose Mourinho's teams· · * Vanity should not be confused with 'Good Grooming'· * You simply can't knock on Mark Hughes' door and invite him for a game of golf - even if he invites you· * Drinking wine does not win you football matches· Coaching badges are ridiculous· * He could never become a manager. Or could he?· * Football is easy· * Good manners should come before diamond earrings· * The League Cup has the edge over the FA CupRobbie Savage's straight-talking common sense is only the start of it. I'll Tell You What is a modern-day guide to life, and should be read by anyone who has an interest in anything at all, especially football. Few may actually agree with him, but everyone listens.
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  • In a Gilded Cage

    By Rhys Bowen
    Authors:
    Rhys Bowen
    Irish immigrant Molly Murphy and her New York City P.I. business are in the midst of a sweeping influenza epidemic and a fight for women's suffrage that lands her in jail. Her betrothed, Police Captain Daniel Sullivan, finds her, but he hardly has time to bail her out, what with Chinese gangs battling for control of a thriving opium trade. The only consolation Molly can take from her vexing afternoon in the clink is that it made her some new friends among the Vassar suffragists---and brought her a pair of new cases.For the first, Emily Boswell is convinced her miserly uncle stole her inheritance and wants Molly to uncover the truth behind her parents' lives and deaths. Second, Emily's college roommate Fanny Poindexter wants Molly to find proof of her husband's philandering so that she can leave him without one red cent. But when Fanny dies and her husband claims she's a victim of the epidemic, it's more than Molly's conscience can take.
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  • In Like Flynn

    By Rhys Bowen
    Authors:
    Rhys Bowen
    Molly's sixth sense is warning her - danger and death lie ahead!A woman private eye in a man's world, Molly Murphy is having a hard time succeeding in running her detective agency in New York. That's why she agrees to go undercover for the NYPD to expose a pair of spiritualist sisters as con artists. even though the offer of work has come from police captain Daniel Sullivan. Sullivan had once won Molly's heart - until she discovered he has a socialite fiancée and an upcoming society wedding. Still, needs must, and so Molly finds herself posing as an Irish cousin at the uptown mansion of Senator Barney Flynn. Flynn's invalid wife hopes the psychic sisters can contact her dead son, kidnapped and lost in a sensational crime, and after a spooky séance, Molly isn't so sure the sisters are fake. but she's certain the police bungled the kidnapping case. But very soon her questions are leading her to danger. and it doesn't take a psychic to tell Molly that if she continues she may very well end up dead!
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  • In Dublin's Fair City

    By Rhys Bowen
    Authors:
    Rhys Bowen
    When New York theatre impresario Tommy Burke asks Molly Murphy to help him take care of some family business back in Ireland, Molly is happy to oblige. Tempted by the prospect of going home for the first time in years (and putting her fledging detective agency on firm financial ground), Molly throws caution to the wind and climbs aboard the White Start Liner Majestic with hopes of sneaking on and off the isle without raising a peep. Until one passenger, who happens to be a famous Broadway actress goes missing-and another turns up dead. So much for smooth sailing . . .
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    Incarnation

    By Daniel Easterman
    Authors:
    Daniel Easterman
    A fast-paced thriller combining the forces of fear, love, heroism and extraordinary adventure. 'In northern India a twelve-year-old boy is being interrogated by three intelligence officers. A tape-recorder turns; there is no air conditioning, no fan. Everyone but the boy is sweating: his tale is so incredible that none dares believe it.' The child appears to be the reincarnation of a dead British secret agent: his knowledge is that of a grown man, Matthew Hyde, who disappeared in China's Sinkiang province whilst investigating the links between Iraqi nuclear scientists and Chinese research bases. Somewhere -- and only the boy knows the secret -- there is a massive conspiracy to supply Saddam Hussein with a weapon against which there can be no defence. From the corridors of power in London to the lost cities of the Taklamakan desert, this crackling novel encompasses fear, love, heroism and extraordinary adventure.
  • The Inspector and Mrs Jeffries

    By Emily Brightwell
    Authors:
    Emily Brightwell
    This charming series of Victorian murder mysteries features mild-mannered Inspector Witherspoon of Scotland Yard and, more importantly, Mrs Jeffries, his housekeeper. A policeman's widow herself, her quick wits allow her to nudge the Inspector in the right direction to solve the crime. When a doctor is discovered dead in his own office, Mrs Jeffries is on the look-out for a prescription for murder, determined to discover the culprit, despite how her employer feels about interviewing suspects . . . "He hated questioning people. He could never tell whether or not someone was actually lying to him, and he knew, shocking as it was, that there were some people who lied to the police on a regular basis."
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    Instructions in Gardening for Ladies

    By Jane C Loudon
    Authors:
    Jane C Loudon
    Having married a gardening expert, it seemed to Jane C Loudon, that everyone around her knew far more about plants and gardening than she did, but she quickly learned the art of horticulture from her husband and decided to pass his teachings on to other ladies to help them enjoy the delights of the garden. Gardening for Ladies was, and still is, an entirely practical book that describes how a lady can make the most of her garden in a clear and precise way. Digging over a flowerbed might have been work for a rough-handed, rope-muscled garden worker, but Jane explained how a lady could tackle the job without undue strain, and explained why it was necessary. The advice and instruction in this classic gardening book is as relevant today as it was when it was written 180 years ago.
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    I Used to Say My Mother Was Shirley Bassey

    By Stephen K Amos
    Authors:
    Stephen K Amos
    Growing up in a large Nigerian family in South London, Stephen K. Amos learnt early on to find the humour in every situation. Raised by his parents and extended family of 'aunts' and 'uncles', I Used to Say My Mother was Shirley Bassey tells the story of Stephen's chaotic upbringing in the carnival atmosphere of the late seventies and early eighties. Stephen describes his awkward beginnings as the only black kid in his class, where he told everyone his mum was Shirley Bassey to break the ice. Then, as a middle child in a large family, Stephen learnt stage presence by vying for attention and performing at family parties. Now a world-renowned comedian and performer, regularly selling out venues like the Hammersmith Apollo, Stephen looks back at his earlier life and the incidents which shaped him and continue to inspire his performances.Poignant, funny, and with the narrative gift Stephen is famous for, I Used to Say My Mother was Shirley Bassey is a memoir of a life fitting in, standing out, and (almost) always laughing.

    I've Said It Before...

    By Andrew Simpson
    Authors:
    Andrew Simpson
    'I read that a woman has left her husband and children to go and live with a Red Indian she met on the internet. Could it be said that her marriage was going through a bad Apache?'Thousands of letters to the Daily Mail go unpublished every week - until now. Included in this collection of 'the best of the rest' are pithy notes from grammar pedants, serious contributions to debates of the day and hilarious misunderstandings, observations and experiences.Corresponding on themes as diverse as Australian tree frogs, the legalisation of cannabis and Camilla Parker-Bowles, the letters of these Daily Mail readers chronicle life in an unmistakeably British way. Some were too oddball, some too polemical, obscure, outrageous or whimsical for initial publication, but all are remarkable for their unique insights into the way we live now...

    I'm With the Brand

    By Rob Walker
    Authors:
    Rob Walker
    Brands are dead. Advertising no longer works. Weaned on cable TV, the Internet, and other emerging technologies, the short-attention-span generation has become immune to marketing. Or so we're told.New York Times Magazine columnist Rob Walker argues that we're experiencing a more important and lasting shift in the dynamic between consumer and consumed than these reductive conclusions would suggest. Technology has created the possibility of advertising anywhere and everywhere, and people are embracing brands more than ever before - creating brands of their own, and participating in marketing campaigns for their favourite brands in unprecedented ways. Increasingly, motivated consumers are pitching in to spread the gospel "virally", whether by creating Internet video ads for Converse All Stars or "tagging" public structures with logos of skatewear companies. In the process, they have begun to funnel their cultural, political, and community activities through their connections with brands. In I'm with the Brand, Walker introduces us to the creative marketers, entrepreneurs and artists who have found a way to thrive in this changing cultural landscape. Using profiles of brands old and new, including Timberland, Apple, Red Bull, iPod, and Nike, Walker demonstrates the ways in which buyers adopt products, not just as consumer choices, but as conscious expressions of their identities. I'm With the Brand tells the story of how what we buy has increasingly has come to define who we are.
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