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  • Nurturing Young Minds

    By Ramesh Manocha
    Authors:
    Ramesh Manocha
    Being a teenager has never been easy, but the digital age has brought with it unique challenges for young people and the adults in their lives. Nurturing Young Minds: Mental Wellbeing in the Digital Age collects expert advice on how to tackle the terrors of the twenty-first century and is a companion to Growing Happy, Healthy Young Minds. A comprehensive and easily accessible guide for parents, teachers, counsellors and health care professionals, this book contains important advice about managing online behaviour, computer game addiction and cyberbullying, as well as essential information on learning disorders, social skills and emotional health. This volume includes up-to-date information on:Understanding Teen Sleep and Drowsy Kids Emotions and Relationships Shape the Brain of Children Understanding the Teenage Brain Healthy Habits for a Digital Life Online Time Management Problematic Internet Use and How to Manage It Computer Game Addiction and Mental Wellbeing Sexting: Realities and Risks Cyberbullying, Cyber-harassment and Revenge Porn The 'Gamblification' of Computer Games Violent Video Games and Violent Behaviour Talking to Young People about Online Porn and Sexual Images Advice for Parents: Be a Mentor, Not a Friend E-mental Health Programs and Interventions Could it be Asperger's? Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties Friendship and Social Skills The Commercialisation of Childhood Sexualisation: Why Should we be Concerned? Porn as a Public Health Crisis How Boys are Travelling and What They Most Need Understanding and Managing Anger and AggressionUnderstanding Boys' Health Needs
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    Naples

    By Desmond Seward
    Authors:
    Desmond Seward
    Many Italian cities look back with pride to the days when they were independent republics: Naples, on the contrary, remembers its days as a royal capital, the brilliant administrative and political centre of The Kingdom of The Two Sicilies, ruled over successively by the house of Anjou, Aragon and Bourbon. Once 'the third city of Europe', today it is one of the least visited of the continent's great cities. The same bustling lively atmosphere and magnificent buildings that one finds in Paris or London exist here.This book is a topographical anthology which recreates for today's tourist the drama, the history and the life of a city in buildings and locations that still exist today. An indispensable companion, it brings the past of Naples vividly to life for the traveller of the present. Extracts from chronicles, memoirs, biographies, letters and novels refer to the most important and beautiful buildings in and around Naples, as well as the lives of travellers to and residents of this famous city.This is a guide to the vanished glories of royal Naples: the departure of the Borbone King Francis II in 1860 as the Risorgimento movement brought about unification of Italy. It records the turbulent and bloodstained days of the Angevin Queens Giovanna I and II, and the revolt led by the young fisherman Masaniello; the artistic life of the city that Petrarch knew, where Caravaggio, Ribera and Giordano painted, and which attracted such diverse visitors as Nelson and Lady Hamilton, Casanova, Goethe, Mozart, John Evelyn and Angelica Kauffman among countless others. The dazzling world of the royalty - their palaces overlooking the legendarily beautiful Bay of Naples, their court balls and ceremonies - is described as well as the pulsing, overcrowded slums of the Spanish quarter and the seafront with its tarantella-dancers, iced-melon vendors, pickpockets and throbbing Neopolitan songs.Naples is still, as it always has been, a city of challenging contrasts: sunlight and squalor, grandeur and decay, gaiety and despair. Its slums and its crime-rate have deterred many, but those who persist will discover, through this illuminating guide, the hidden glories of this famous city.
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    Norse Myths and Legends

    By Martyn Whittock, Hannah Whittock
    Authors:
    Martyn Whittock, Hannah Whittock
    While the main focus of the book is on telling the stories, some scene-setting is provided at the beginning and each chapter also contains a section of commentary to explain what is going on and its significance.The Norse myths have gained widespread attention in the English-speaking world, partly through a Scandinavian diaspora, especially in the USA) and partly through a great interest in the myths and legends which lie behind Viking activity. Tolkien's 'Middle Earth', too, as seen in both The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit films is heavily indebted to Germanic/Norse mythology. The Whittock's book fills a gap in the market between academic publications and the interest-generating (but confusing) products of Hollywood and comic-culture. This is an accessible book, which both provides a retelling of these dramatic stories and also sets them in context so that their place within the Viking world can be understood. The book explores Norse myths (stories, usually religious, which explain origins, why things are as they are, the nature of the spiritual) and legends (stories which attempt to explain historical events and which may involve historical characters but which are told in a non-historical way and which often include supernatural events).
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    No Milk Today

    By Andrew Ward
    Authors:
    Andrew Ward
    Traditionally, in British society, the milkman has been a family friend, a sex symbol and a cheerful chappie. He has been the eyes and ears of the community, and his genetic legacy has supposedly passed into the lineage of housewives.This collection of folk tales about milkmen covers the history of the job and the milkman's everyday experience. The book is structured by the milkman's working day. It starts with the alarm-clock and ends with the milkman returning home in search of sustenance and tender loving care. The book is less about changes in the dairy industry and more about the work experiences of the people who have delivered milk. Many milkmen are featured: Chris Frankland delivered over eight million pints before he retired at seventy-four; Alistair Maclean drove two million miles across the north coast of Scotland in fifty years; and Tony Fowler, an award-winning Leicestershire milkman, helped to put over fifty people in prison.For more than thirty years the author has collected milkman stories through oral testimony, newspaper archives, anecdotes, diaries, books and more formal interviews.Praise for the author:Barnsley: A Study in Football, 1953-59 (with Ian Alister, Crowberry 1981)'A rare example of folk history . . . a work thankfully free of sick parrots, bulging nets and exclusive revelations.' (The Yorkshire Post)'riveting, dreamy, passionate, valuable and stuff of a past era which must not be forgotten . . . I read it in an all-night session.' (Frank Keating, Guardian)
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    Nicholas II, The Last Tsar

    By Michael Paterson
    Authors:
    Michael Paterson
    The character of the last Tsar, Nicholas II (1868-1918) is crucial to understanding the overthrow of tsarist Russia, the most significant event in Russian history. Nicholas became Tsar at the age of 26. Though a conscientious man who was passionate in his devotion to his country, he was weak, sentimental, dogmatic and indecisive. Ironically he could have made an effective constitutional monarch, but these flaws rendered him fatally unsuited to be the sole ruler of a nation that was in the throes of painful modernisation. That he failed is not surprising, for many abler monarchs could not have succeeded. Rather to be wondered at is that he managed, for 23 years, to hold on to power despite the overwhelming force of circumstances. Though Nicholas was exasperating, he had many endearing qualities. A modern audience, aware - as contemporaries were not - of the private pressures under which he lived, can empathise with him and forgive some of his errors of judgement. To some readers he seems a fool, to others a monster, but many are touched by the story of a well-meaning man doing his best under impossible conditions. He is, in other words, a biographical subject that engages readers whatever their viewpoint. His family was of great importance to Nicholas. He and his wife, Alexandra, married for love and retained this affection to the end of their lives. His four daughters, all different and intriguing personalities, were beautiful and charming. His son, the family's - and the nation's - hope for the future, was disabled by an illness that had to be concealed from Russia and from the world. It was this circumstance that made possible the nefarious influence of Rasputin, which in turn hastened the end of the dynasty.This story has everything: romance and tragedy, grandeur and misery, human frailty and an international catastrophe that would not only bring down the Tsar but put an end to the glittering era of European monarchies.
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    The Night of the Triffids

    By Simon Clark
    Authors:
    Simon Clark
    In John Wyndham's classic bestsellerThe Day of the Triffids the world has been overwhelmed by killer plants that have blinded almost the entire population. As the novel ends, Wyndham's narrator scientist Bill Masen is escaping, with his wife and four-year-old son, to the Isle of Wight where a small colony of survivors is holding out. Simon Clark's sequels picks up the story twenty-five years on. The survivors are safe, for the time being at least, on their island, where they have continued efforts to combat the triffids, while also striving in various ways to build a new civilization - in a Mother House, for example, women spend their lives endlessly giving birth. Elsewhere in the world, similar colonies cling to survival, while the triffids persist in their attempts to destroy humanity. One morning Bill Masen's son, David, now grown up, wakes to a world plunged into darkness. Now, the triffids have an advantage over even sighted humanity. Simon Clark has written an inventive and fast-moving sequel to Wyndham's story, crafting an elegant and scary tale of humanity's ongoing fightback against the triffids.

    The New Laws of Psychology

    By Peter Kinderman
    Authors:
    Peter Kinderman
    This controversial new book describes how human behaviour - thoughts, emotions, actions and mental health - can be largely explained if we understand how people make sense of their world and how that framework of understanding has been learned. In this ground-breaking book, Peter Kinderman, presents a simple, but radical new model of mental well-being. Published following the publication of the new edition of the controversial, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, the author challenges notions such as 'mental illness' and 'abnormal psychology' as old-fashioned, demeaning and invalid, and argues that diagnoses such as 'depression' and 'schizophrenia' are unhelpful. Kinderman argues that one consequence of our current obsession with a medical approach to human well-being and distress, is that human problems are too often merely diagnosed and treated, rather than understood. Witten by an expert in his field, and accessible to all those interested in and affected by mental health issues, The New Laws of Psychology will change the way we define mental illness forever.
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  • The New Mammoth Book Of Pulp Fiction

    By Maxim Jakubowski
    Authors:
    Maxim Jakubowski
    Pulp fiction has been looked down on as a guilty pleasure, but it offers the perfect form of entertainment: the very best storytelling filled with action, surprises, sound and fury. In short, all the exhiliration of a roller-coaster ride. The 1920s in America saw the proliferation of hundreds of dubiously named but thrillingly entertaining pulp magazines in America - Black Mask, Amazing, Astounding, Spicy Stories, Ace-High, Detective Magazine, Dare-Devil Aces. It was in these luridly-coloured publications, printed on the cheapest pulp paper, that the first gems began to appear. The one golden rule for writers of pulp fiction was to adhere to the art of storytelling. Each story had to have a beginning, an end, economically-etched characters, but plenty going on, both in terms of action and emotions. Pulp magazines were the TV of their day, plucking readers from drab lives and planting them firmly in thrilling make-believe, successors to the Victorian penny dreadfuls of writers such as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Charles Dickens. These stories exemplify the best of crime and mystery pulp fiction - its zest, speed, rhythm, verve and commitment to straightforward storytelling - spanning seven decades of popular writing.
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    The New Curry Secret

    By Kris Dhillon
    Authors:
    Kris Dhillon
    Kris Dhillon's first book, The Curry Secret, revealed the secret of the basic curry sauce used by Indian restaurant chefs. Since that book's first publication, there has been an increase in the variety of new and vibrant Indian dishes served in restaurants. Now her second book, The New Curry Secret, shows how to create these wonderful new dishes easily and expertly. The mouthwatering recipes include Chicken Chettinad, Lamb Kalia, Balti Subzi, Beef Badami, Fish Ambotik, Malabar Prawn Biryani, to name just a few.The New Curry Secret also includes a new recipe for the curry sauce - which smells great even in the making! Plus labour-saving ideas and tips to make cooking your favourite Indian restaurant food at home even easier.

    Neptune and Surf (Modern Erotic Classics)

    By Marilyn Jaye Lewis
    Authors:
    Marilyn Jaye Lewis
    This trio of explicit novellas captures the unique character of love and sex in America in three different eras of its history. Neptune & Surf shows us a world of forbidden interracial sex in New York's infamous Coney Island in 1955; The Mercy Cure is a modern-day exploration of BDSM sex among de-frocked lesbian nuns; and Gianni's Girl is the infamous account of a haunting gangbang among Chicago's bootleggers in 1927. Hardcore, uncompromising, explicit and powerful: Neptune & Surf is a sensation.

    Neck And Back Pain

    By Chris Jenner
    Authors:
    Chris Jenner
    Chronic neck or back pain can seriously affect all aspects of daily life. This marvellous little book will empower the patient with self-knowledge and increased awareness of the treatment options available to bring about much needed relief. A must-read for all sufferers." How to manage your Neck and Back Pain by becoming an expert patient. Far from just being the curse of the elderly, neck and back pain affects the majority of the adult population at some point in their lives, as well as huge numbers of children and adolescents. Even in chronic cases, however, it does not have to mean the end of life as you once knew it. With the knowledge contained in this book and the right care, you can regain control and live a happy and productive life. In his reassuringly down-to-earth guide, Dr Chris Jenner describes the many causes of neck and back pain in easily understood laymen's terms. He then explores what it means to live with neck and back conditions in a practical sense, sets out your treatment options, and advises on how you can very greatly reduce your levels of pain and increase your quality of life.Contents: Preface; Part One: Understanding Neck and Back Pain; Part Two: Living with Neck and Back Pain; Part Three: Managing and Treating Neck and Back Pain; Part Four: The Medico-Legal Implications of Neck and Back Problems; Conclusion; Index.
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    Napoleon's Expedition to Russia

    By Chris Summerville
    Authors:
    Chris Summerville
    Napoleon's invasion of Russia in 1812 remains one of the greatest military and humanitarian disasters of all time. Within six months a million lives were lost, the largest army ever assembled was destroyed, and the Emperor himself transformed from the master of a continent to a fugitive.General Count de Segur's first-hand account remains our chief source of information about this most dramatic of military debacles. From the Grand Army's first steps on Russian soil, to its miraculous escape at the River Berezina, this must rank as one of the greatest war stories ever written.First published in 1824, it caused a sensation. The author, who had served on the Emperor's staff, dared to present him as a flawed genius, resulting in a duel with Napoleon's former aide-de-camp, General Gourgaud. The public blood-letting (de Segur was wounded) only heightened demand and it was translated into every major European language.

    Napoleon Bonaparte: England's Prisoner

    By Frank Giles
    Authors:
    Frank Giles
    On 13 July 1815, after Waterloo, Napoleon dictated his famous letter to the Prince Regent. Avoiding any hint of surrender, still less responsibility for the defeat, he said he came 'like Themistocles to throw myself upon the hospitality of the British people.' But his idea of living peacefully in the English countryside was a pipedream: the island of St Helena was desolate and unappealing. The Governor, Sir Hudson Lowe, has been reviled by historians, but Giles gives a fresh perspective on Lowe, as on other aspects of the Emperor's exile.

    Nazi Hunter

    By Alan Levy
    Authors:
    Alan Levy
    Simon Wiesenthal spent four and a half years in Mauthausen concentration camp during World War II. With the exception of his wife, all his immediate family were exterminated, and he himself ended the war a living skeleton. Since then, he has achieved international reknown for his tireless and successful tracking down of Nazi war criminals, including notorious figures such as Eichmann, the 'desk murderer' who masterminded Hitler's Final Solution; Stangl the overlord of Treblinka; and the Mengele of Auschwitz, the dreaded 'Angel of Death'. To this day his work continues, his motivation simply expressed in the words: 'Justice, not vengeance'. This work provides an account of Wiesenthal's inspired detective work.
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    The Nature of Unhappiness

    By David Smail
    Authors:
    David Smail
    David Smail's books work to a central theme - that psychological distress arises not from 'illness' or personal failure but as a response to damaging influences from the outside world. He believes that such distress can be alleviated by care and understanding from our fellows. He also examines how the dominant values of society and politics can have devastating effects on the individual, and consequently that counsellors and therapists can have limited success in treating such problems - that in fact it is the circumstances and not the individual, that need to be altered.
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