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A Comprehensive Guide to Gamekeeping & Shoot Management

By J.C. Jeremy Hobson
Authors:
J.C. Jeremy Hobson
This book shows the reader how to perform all the tasks required of the modern gamekeeper, including how to rear and release game, and advises on many aspects of habitat improvement and conservation. It also covers important and sometimes controversial issues, such as public access on private land, the need for predator and pest control, and many other aspects which need to be considered by keepers, be they part-time or professional.
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The Complete Guide to Tracking

By Bob Carss
Authors:
Bob Carss
Discover how to track and stalk any living thing in any environment, including woodland, marsh, jungle and desert. The reader will learn how to:Interpret animal, human and vehicle signs.Preserve night vision. Use time frames to eliminate misleading signs. Detect quarry when they backtrack or circle around. Understand how time and weather affect signs. Spot intentionally misleading signs.The skills of observation, memory and analysis that a tracker employs are essential not only for the military and law enforcement agencies but are also invaluable for search and rescue teams, scouts, youth leaders, outdoor pursuit teachers, bird-watchers, ramblers, farmers, livestock owners and game keepers.
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Chomolungma Sings the Blues

By Ed Douglas
Authors:
Ed Douglas
If there is one mountain that is known across the whole world, it must be the highest - Everest. To the people who live at its feet she is Chomolungma, Goddess Mother of the World. The disappearance of George Mallory and Andrew Irvine close to the summit in 1924 lent the mountain a tragic romanticism, of young men risking everything for a dream. When Norgay Tenzing and Ed Hillary became the first men to stand on the summit in 1953, it was the crowning glory for the coronation of Elizabeth II.But nearly fifty years on, there are scores of ascents nearly every season. There are stories of bodies and heaps of garbage abandoned on the slopes, of the loss of cultural identity among the Sherpas and Tibetans who live at the foot of Everest. Ed Douglas spent parts of 1995 and 1996 travelling in Nepal and Tibet, talking to politicians and environmentalists, to mountaineers and local people. He found a poor region struggling to develop, and encountering environmental problems far greater than rubbish left by climbers. Local people are resourceful and cultured, reliant on the work the mountaineers and the mountain provide, but striving to find a balance between the new and the old.
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