Derek Wilson - A Brief History of the English Reformation - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781845296469
    • Publication date:21 Jun 2012
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A Brief History of the English Reformation

By Derek Wilson

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Derek Wilson retells the story of how the Tudor monarchs transformed the English religion and why it still matters today

Religion, politics and fear: how England was transformed by the Tudors.

The English Reformation was a unique turning point in English history. Derek Wilson retells the story of how the Tudor monarchs transformed English religion and why it still matters today. Recent scholarly research has undermined the traditional view of the Reformation as an event that occurred solely amongst the elite. Wilson now shows that, although the transformation was political and had a huge impact on English identity, on England's relationships with its European neighbours and on the foundations of its empire, it was essentially a revolution from the ground up. By 1600, in just eighty years, England had become a radically different nation in which family, work and politics, as well as religion, were dramatically altered.

Praise for Derek Wilson:

'Stimulating and authoritative.' John Guy.

'Masterly. [Wilson] has a deep understanding of . . . characters, reaching out across the centuries.' Sunday Times.

Biographical Notes

Derek Wilson is a renowned Tudor historian. He is the author of over 30 books including BHO the Circumnavigators, The Uncrowned Kings of England for Constable as well as recent biographies of Charlemaigne and Holbein (Pimlico). He is the founder of the Cambridge History festival and we are publishing Francis Walsingham in 2007.

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  • ISBN: 9781849018258
  • Publication date: 21 Jun 2012
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  • Imprint: Robinson
Constable

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