Thomas Crump - A Brief History of How the Industrial Revolution Changed the World - Little, Brown Book Group

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A Brief History of How the Industrial Revolution Changed the World

By Thomas Crump

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

The ideas, people and inventions that built the modern world

From the beginning of the eighteenth century to the high water mark of the Victorian era, the world was transformed by a technological revolution the like of which had never been seen before. Inventors, businessmen, scientists, explorers all had their part to play in the story of the Industrial Revolution and in this Brief History Thomas Crump brings their story to life, and shows why it is a chapter in English history that can not be ignored.

Previous praise for Thomas Crump's A Brief History of Science:

'A serious and fully furnished history of science, from which anyone interested in the development of ideas . . . will greatly profit.' A. C. Grayling, Financial Times

'Provides an enduring sense of the extraordinary ingenuity that defines our relationship with nature.' Guardian

'An excellent account . . Crump writes with authority.' TLS

Biographical Notes

Thomas Crump used to teach Anthropology at Amsterdam University. He is the author of A Brief History of Science and A Brief History of the Age of Steam.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781845298975
  • Publication date: 27 May 2010
  • Page count: 400
  • Imprint: Robinson
A clear and concise explanation of an unwieldy but fascinating subject. — Good Book Guide
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