Nicholas Vincent - A Brief History of Britain 1066 - 1485 - Little, Brown Book Group

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A Brief History of Britain 1066 - 1485

By Nicholas Vincent

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

From the Norman Conquest to the Battle of Bosworth Field - how Britain was invaded and become a nation. The first volume in the stunning four volume Brief History of Britain series.

From the Battle of Hastings to the Battle of Bosworth Field, Nicholas Vincent tells the story of how Britain was born.

When William, Duke of Normandy, killed King Harold and seized the throne of England, England's language, culture, politics and law were transformed. Over the next four hundred years, under royal dynasties that looked principally to France for inspiration and ideas, an English identity was born, based in part upon struggle for control over the other parts of the British Isles (Scotland, Wales and Ireland), in part upon rivalry with the kings of France. From these struggles emerged English law and an English Parliament, the English language, English humour and England's first overseas empires.

In this thrilling and accessible account, Nicholas Vincent not only tells the story of the rise and fall of dynasties, but investigates the lives and obsessions of a host of lesser men and women, from archbishops to peasants, and from soldiers to scholars, upon whose enterprise the social and intellectual foundations of Englishness now rest.

This the first book in the four volume Brief History of Britain which brings together some of the leading historians to tell our nation's story from the Norman Conquest of 1066 to the present-day. Combining the latest research with accessible and entertaining story telling, it is the ideal introduction for students and general readers.

Biographical Notes

Nicholas Vincent has published half a dozen books and some fifty academic articles on various aspects of English and European history in the 12th and 13th centuries. He has studied at Oxford, Cambridge, Paris and Canterbury and now is professor at the University of East Anglia.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781845293963
  • Publication date: 23 Jun 2011
  • Page count: 560
  • Imprint: Robinson
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