Daphne Du Maurier - Vanishing Cornwall - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780748114672
    • Publication date:20 Oct 2016
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Vanishing Cornwall

By Daphne Du Maurier

  • Paperback
  • £16.99

Beautiful, mysterious, Cornwall exerts a potent spell on all who visit it.

'There was a smell in the air of tar and rope and rusted chain, a smell of tidal water. Down harbour, around the point, was the open sea. Here was the freedom I desired, long sought-for, not yet known. Freedom to write, to walk, to wander, freedom to climb hills, to pull a boat, to be alone . . . I for this, and this for me.'

Daphne du Maurier lived in Cornwall for most of her life. Its rugged coastline, wild terrain and tumultuous weather inspired her imagination, and many of her works are set there, including Rebecca, Jamaica Inn and Frenchman's Creek. In Vanishing Cornwall she celebrates the land she loved, exploring its legends, its history and its people, eloquently making a powerful plea for Cornwall's preservation.

Biographical Notes

Daphne du Maurier (1907-89) was born in London, the daughter of the famous actor-manager Sir Gerald du Maurier and granddaughter of George du Maurier, the author and artist. In 1931 her first novel, The Loving Spirit, was published. A biography of her father and three other novels followed, but it was the novel Rebecca that launched her into the literary stratosphere and made her one of the most popular authors of her day. In 1932, du Maurier married Major Frederick Browning, with whom she had three children.
Many of du Maurier's bestselling novels and short stories were adapted into award-winning films, including Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now. In 1969 du Maurier was awarded a DBE. She lived most of her life in Cornwall, the setting for many of her books.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781844088539
  • Publication date: 08 Mar 2012
  • Page count: 212
  • Imprint: Virago
This classic evocation of du Maurier's beloved home ranks as a work of art ... Reissued with handsome photos by Daphne's son, these glorious accounts, all set against superbly sketched landscapes, still cast their eerie spell — Independent
An eloquent elegy on the past of a county she loved so much — The Times
Hachette Audio

Outrages

Naomi Wolf
Authors:
Naomi Wolf

The bestselling author of Vagina illuminates a dramatic history - how a single English law in 1857 led to a maelstrom, with reverberations lasting down to our day. That law was the Obscene Publications Act and it was a crucial turning point. Why? Because dissent and morality; 'deviancy' and 'normalcy'; unprintable and printable were suddenly lawful concepts in the modern sense. This new law effectively invented modern obscenity. Before 1857 it wasn't 'homosexuality' - a term that didn't yet exist - that was a crime, but simply the act of sodomy. But in a single stroke, not only was love between men illegal, but anything referring to this love also became obscene, unprintable, unspeakable. And writers, editors and printers became the gatekeepers with a responsibility to uphold the morals of the society - followed by serious criminal penalties if they didn't. And as the act evolved, joined by other laws against sexual representation and speech, making their way to courts, the authors' or artists' intentions were deemed immaterial. What mattered was if the work in question had a 'tendency . . . to deprave and corrupt those whose minds are open to such immoral influences, and into whose hands a publication of this sort may fall'. Wolf paints the dramatic ways this set of laws and consolidation of what we would call homophobia and censorship, played out among a bohemian group of sexual dissidents, including Walt Whitman in America and the homosexual English critic John Addington Symonds - in love with Whitman's homoerotic voice in Leaves of Grass - decades before the infamous 1895 trial of Oscar Wilde. She retrieves forgotten history of men and even young teenage boys, executed at the Old Bailey for 'sodomy' or even 'the attempt'. Algernon Charles Swinburne, Dante and Christina Rossetti, Walter Pater and painter Simeon Solomon, were among the writers and artists, and countless booksellers and printers, whose lives were shadowed with jeopardy from this emerging network of laws against speech and love. She depicts both a fascinating story and, crucially, an important way of understanding how we arrived at our ideas of 'normalcy' and 'deviancy' - and the idea of the state's purported need and right to police speech - ideas which are with us to this day. Most powerfully, Wolf recounts how a dying Symonds helped write the book on 'sexual inversion' that created our modern understanding of homosexuality. She argues that his secret memoir, mined and explained here fully for the first time, together with a secretly published essay, evolved into what would become the first mainstream gay rights manifesto in the west - proving that the literature of love will ultimately triumph over censorship.

Fleet

The Burning Girl

Claire Messud
Authors:
Claire Messud

A bracing and hypnotic portrait of the complexities of female friendship from the New York Times bestselling author of The Woman Upstairs.Julia Robinson and Cassie Burnes have been friends since nursery school. They have shared everything, including their desire to escape the stifling limitations of their birthplace, the quiet town of Royston, Massachusetts. But as the two girls enter adolescence, their paths diverge: while Julia comes from a stable, happy, middle-class family, Cassie never knew her father, who died when she was an infant, and has an increasingly tempestuous relationship with her single mother, Bev. When Bev becomes involved with the mysterious Anders Shute, Cassie feels cruelly abandoned. Disturbed, angry and desperate for answers, she sets out on a journey that will put her own life in danger, and shatter her oldest friendship. Compact, compelling, and ferociously sad, The Burning Girl is at once a story about childhood, friendship and community, and a complex examination of the stories we tell ourselves about childhood and friendship. Claire Messud brilliantly mixes folklore and Bildungsroman, exploring the ways in which our made-up stories, and their consequences, become real.

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Quicksilver

HRH Princess Michael of Kent
Authors:
HRH Princess Michael of Kent

From HRH Princess Michael of Kent, bestselling author of The Queen of Four Kingdoms, comes the eagerly-anticipated third volume in the Anjou trilogy.The final volume of the Anjou trilogy focuses on merchant Jacques Coeur, a man of humble beginnings but fiercely ambitious, who became one of the richest and most powerful men in fifteenth century France. HRH Princess Michael of Kent vividly re-enacts the life of Jacques Coeur as he becomes trusted confidante and champion of the Anjou royal family, particularly of his beloved patroness Yolande, Queen of the Four Kingdoms, and, of course, the beautiful and captivating Agnes Sorel who Jacques comes to know and understand as a friend.As Jacques's star shines brighter and brighter, his story runs parallel to that of Yolande and Agnes Sorel until the three interlink in devastating fashion and Jacques's ambition and generosity become his downfall. Meticulously researched and powerfully evoked, HRH Princess Michael of Kent unveils a seldom told story, enriched by her own insider's perspective of royal life.

Sphere

Cleopatra's Shadows

Emily Holleman
Authors:
Emily Holleman
Virago

Don't Look Now And Other Stories

Daphne Du Maurier
Authors:
Daphne Du Maurier
Virago

The Birds And Other Stories

Daphne Du Maurier
Authors:
Daphne Du Maurier

'How long he fought with them in the darkness he could not tell, but at last the beating of the wings about him lessened and then withdrew . . . 'A classic of alienation and horror, 'The Birds' was immortalised by Hitchcock in his celebrated film. The five other chilling stories in this collection echo a sense of dislocation and mock man's sense of dominance over the natural world. The mountain paradise of 'Monte Verità' promises immortality, but at a terrible price; a neglected wife haunts her husband in the form of an apple tree; a professional photographer steps out from behind the camera and into his subject's life; a date with a cinema usherette leads to a walk in the cemetery; and a jealous father finds a remedy when three's a crowd . . .

Virago

The Praise Singer

Mary Renault
Authors:
Mary Renault
Virago

The Blunderer

Patricia Highsmith
Authors:
Patricia Highsmith
Virago

Edith's Diary

Patricia Highsmith
Authors:
Patricia Highsmith

'Edith's fall takes the form of a psychological chiller, but there is also something larger, the poignancy of her struggle not to go under. She is betrayed by such ordinary dreams' New York TimesEdith Howland's diary is her most precious possession, and as she is moving house she is making sure it's safe. A suburban housewife in fifties America, she is moving to Brunswick with her husband Brett and her beloved son, Cliffie, to start a new life for them all. She is optimistic, but most of all she has high hopes for her new venture with Brett, a local newspaper, the Brunswick Corner Bugle. Life seems full of promise, and indeed, to read her diary, filled with her most intimate feelings and revelations, you would never think otherwise. Strange, then, that reality is so dangerously different . . .

ATOM

Unspeakable

Abbie Rushton
Authors:
Abbie Rushton
Sphere

Native Stranger

Alastair Scott
Authors:
Alastair Scott

After ten years of wanderlust which took him to nearly seventy countries around the world, Alastair Scott decided it was time to make 'home' his destination. Resolving to explore Scotland and the Scottish people in as much depth and breadth as possible, the author drew up an itinerary which would take him from the outermost isle to the innermost city, sampling the experiences of modern Scotland in all their diversity. Encompassing issues of the land, eccentrics in castles, the state of the Gaidheal, homelessness in Edinburgh, and all the idiosyncrasies of history, development and decline in between, Scott's journey covered four thousand miles of island, mountain and lowland. The variety of place and circumstance was exceeded only by that of the characters encountered en route. The result is a detailed and engrossing portrait of contemporary Scotland, and of one man's rediscovery of his native land.

Piatkus

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Charlotte Betts
Authors:
Charlotte Betts

1792. As a teacher at her parents' Academy for Young Ladies in the heart of London, Madeleine Moreau has lived her life sheltered from the outside world. But on the night of a dazzling Masquerade, tragedy strikes and she is left alone in the world. Desperate to find the family she never knew, Madeleine impulsively travels to France in search of them. But with war around the corner, and fearing for Madeleine's safety, the enigmatic Comte Etienne d'Aubery offers her protection at his home, Chateau Mirabelle.Chateau Mirabelle enchants Madeleine with its startling beauty, but it is a place of dark and haunting secrets. As the Revolution gathers momentum and the passions of the populace are enflamed, Madeleine must take control of her own destiny and unravel events of the past in order to secure a chance of future happiness. The Chateau on the Lake is an enthralling historical novel set during the time of the French Revolution; rich, evocative and immersive. If you love Philippa Gregory and Joanne Harris, you will adore Charlotte Betts.

Corsair

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John Waters is putting his life on the line. Armed with wit, a pencil-thin mustache, and a cardboard sign that reads 'I'm Not Psycho', he hitchhikes across America from Baltimore to San Francisco, braving lonely roads and treacherous drivers. But who should we be more worried about, the delicate film director with genteel manners or the unsuspecting travelers transporting the Pope of Trash?Along the way, Waters fantasises about the best and worst possible scenarios: a friendly drug dealer hands over piles of cash to finance films with no questions asked, a demolition-derby driver makes a filthy sexual request in the middle of a race, a gun-toting drunk terrorizes and holds him hostage, and a Kansas vice squad entraps and throws him in jail. So what really happens when this cult legend sticks out his thumb and faces the open road? Laced with subversive humour and warm intelligence, Carsick is an unforgettable vacation with a wickedly funny companion - and a celebration of America's weird, astonishing, and generous citizens.

Constable

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Constable

A Gull on the Roof

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Authors:
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The first title in the Minack Chronicles, which tell the story of how Derek and his wife Jeannie left behind their London home to establish a flower farm on the coast of Cornwall. From inauspicious beginnings, this book includes tales of the couple's first animals, including Monty the ginger cat, and takes us through trials and tribulations until the arrival of a gull on the roof provides the first augury of better times to come.

Virago

Daphne du Maurier Omnibus 4

Daphne Du Maurier
Authors:
Daphne Du Maurier

Includes Rebecca and My Cousin Rachel. Rebecca, Daphne du Maurier's best-known and bestselling novel, is the classic tale of a young woman who marries handsome widower Maxim de Winter and moves to his great house at Manderley in Cornwall, only to find that all is not as it first seems . . . In My Cousin Rachel, Philip Ashley, an orphan raised by his benevolent cousin Ambrose, is drawn into the orbit of Ambrose's beautiful, mysterious new wife Rachel.

Virago

Daphne du Maurier Omnibus 3

Daphne Du Maurier
Authors:
Daphne Du Maurier
Virago

Daphne du Maurier Omnibus 2

Daphne Du Maurier
Authors:
Daphne Du Maurier

Includes The House on the Strand, Julius, The Loving Spirit and The Doll: Short Stories.Written in the tradition of Poe and Lovecraft, The House on the Strand is a gripping, time-travelling horror tale. The eponymous hero of Julius is a quick-witted urchin caught up in the Franco-Prussian war, who is soon on his way to seek a fortune in London. The Loving Spirit, Daphne du Maurier's first published novel, is the history of the lives, loves and hardships of a Cornish family at the turn of the twentieth century. This omnibus also includes The Doll, a collection of some of du Maurier's most thrilling short stories.

Virago

Daphne du Maurier Omnibus 1

Daphne Du Maurier
Authors:
Daphne Du Maurier
Virago

Rule Britannia

Daphne Du Maurier
Authors:
Daphne Du Maurier

It is rather awful, Emma thought as she walked across the fields down to the farm, how this business is leading us all into subterfuge and deception, and we can't really tell who is friend and who is enemy . . . 'Emma wakes up one morning to an apocalyptic world. The cosy existence she shares with her grandmother, a famous retired actress, has been shattered: there's no post, no telephone, no radio - and an American warship sits in the harbour. As the two women piece together clues about the 'friendly' military occupation on their doorstep, family, friends and neighbours gather round to protect their heritage. In this chilling novel of the future, Daphne du Maurier explores the implications of a political, economic and military alliance between Britain and the United States.