Antonia White - As Once In May - Little, Brown Book Group

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As Once In May

By Antonia White

  • Paperback
  • £9.00

Antonia White's autobiography of her early years

Throughout her life, Antonia White struggled with a formidable writer's block: the FROST IN MAY quartet was thought to be her final achievement. Yet on her death, this extraordinary work - her autobiography up to the age of six - was discovered among her papers.

The freshness and vitality with which Antonia White recorded her much younger self is breathtaking. A writer with the phenomenal power of almost total recall, she recreates her capricious and extravagant mother and the indomitable father she both feared and adored, who taught Antonia the first line of the Iliad when she was three. Here, too, are perfect vignettes: the glorious bridesmaid's hat which her mother later appropriated; love at first sight in Kensington Gardens and games of Mr and Mrs John Barker in the nursery. Much more than an evocation of childhood, AS ONCE IN MAY illuminates the woman and writer Antonia White was to become. It is an essential and enthralling companion to her fiction.

Biographical Notes

Antonia White was born in 1899 and educated at in London at St. Paul's and RADA. She worked as a journalist and in the Foreign Office.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781844084180
  • Publication date: 26 Apr 2007
  • Page count: 160
  • Imprint: Virago
Her autobiography - on which Antonia White was working until the end of her life - is her final masterpiece — Sunday Telegraph
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