Daphne Du Maurier - Julius - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780748114603
    • Publication date:07 Jan 2010
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Julius

By Daphne Du Maurier

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

A chilling story of ambition, Daphne du Maurier's third novel has lost none of its ability to unsettle and disturb.

'His first instinct was to stretch out his hands to the sky. The white clouds seemed so near to him, surely they were easy to hold and to caress, strange-moving things belonging to the wide blue space of heaven . . . '

Julius Levy grows up in a peasant family in a village on the banks of the Seine. A quick-witted urchin caught up in the Franco-Prussian War, he is soon forced by tragedy to escape to Algeria. Once there, he learns the ease of swindling, the rewards of love affairs and the value of secrecy.

Before he's twenty, he is in London, where his empire-building begins in earnest, and he becomes a rich and very ruthless man. Throughout his life, Julius is driven by a hunger for power, his one weakness his daughter, Gabriel . . .

A chilling story of ambition, Daphne du Maurier's third novel has lost none of its ability to unsettle and disturb.

Biographical Notes

Daphne du Maurier (1907-89) was born in London, the daughter of the famous actor-manager Sir Gerald du Maurier and granddaughter of George du Maurier, the author and artist. In 1931 her first novel, The Loving Spirit, was published. A biography of her father and three other novels followed, but it was the novel Rebecca that launched her into the literary stratosphere and made her one of the most popular authors of her day. In 1932, du Maurier married Major Frederick Browning, with whom she had three children.
Many of du Maurier's bestselling novels and short stories were adapted into award-winning films, including Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now. In 1969 du Maurier was awarded a DBE. She lived most of her life in Cornwall, the setting for many of her books.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781844080687
  • Publication date: 04 Mar 2004
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: Virago
She wrote exciting plots, she was highly skilled at arousing suspense, and she was, too, a writer of fearless originality — Guardian
One of the last century's most original literary talents — Daily Telegraph
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