Lian Xi - Blood Letters - Little, Brown Book Group

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Blood Letters

The Untold Story of Lin Zhao, a Martyr in Mao's China

By Lian Xi

  • Hardback
  • £25.00

The staggering story of the most influential Chinese political dissident of the Mao era, a devout Christian who was imprisoned, tortured, and executed by the regime

The staggering story of the most influential Chinese political dissident of the Mao era, a devout Christian who was imprisoned, tortured, and executed by the regime

Blood Letters tells the astonishing tale of Lin Zhao, a Chinese poet and journalist arrested by the regime in 1960 and executed eight years later, at the height of the Cultural Revolution. Alone among the victims of Mao's dictatorship, she maintained a stubborn and open opposition during the years she was imprisoned. She rooted her dissent in her Christian faith--and expressed it in long, prophetic writings done in her own blood, and at times on her clothes and on cloth torn from her bedsheets.

Miraculously, Lin Zhao's prison writings survived, though they have only recently come to light. Drawing on these works and others from the years before her arrest, as well as interviews with friends, family, and classmates, Lian Xi paints an indelible portrait of courage and faith in the face of unrelenting evil.

Biographical Notes

Lian Xi is a professor of world Christianity at Duke Divinity School. The author Redeemed by Fire and The Conversion of Missionaries, he lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781541644236
  • Publication date: 26 Apr 2018
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: Basic Books
Hachette Australia

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Hachette Australia

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Abacus

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