Lian Xi - Blood Letters - Little, Brown Book Group

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds

Blood Letters

The Untold Story of Lin Zhao, a Martyr in Mao's China

By Lian Xi

  • Hardback
  • £25.00

The staggering story of the most influential Chinese political dissident of the Mao era, a devout Christian who was imprisoned, tortured, and executed by the regime

The staggering story of the most influential Chinese political dissident of the Mao era, a devout Christian who was imprisoned, tortured, and executed by the regime

Blood Letters tells the astonishing tale of Lin Zhao, a Chinese poet and journalist arrested by the regime in 1960 and executed eight years later, at the height of the Cultural Revolution. Alone among the victims of Mao's dictatorship, she maintained a stubborn and open opposition during the years she was imprisoned. She rooted her dissent in her Christian faith--and expressed it in long, prophetic writings done in her own blood, and at times on her clothes and on cloth torn from her bedsheets.

Miraculously, Lin Zhao's prison writings survived, though they have only recently come to light. Drawing on these works and others from the years before her arrest, as well as interviews with friends, family, and classmates, Lian Xi paints an indelible portrait of courage and faith in the face of unrelenting evil.

Biographical Notes

Lian Xi is a professor of world Christianity at Duke Divinity School. The author Redeemed by Fire and The Conversion of Missionaries, he lives in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781541644236
  • Publication date: 26 Apr 2018
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: Basic Books
Hachette Australia

HMAS Sydney

Tom Frame
Authors:
Tom Frame
Hachette Australia

The Suitcase Baby

Tanya Bretherton
Authors:
Tanya Bretherton

True history that is both shocking and too real, this unforgettable tale moves at the pace of a great crime novel.In the early hours of Saturday morning, 17 November 1923, a suitcase was found washed up on the shore of a small beach in the Sydney suburb of Mosman. What it contained - and why - would prove to be explosive.The murdered baby in the suitcase was one of many dead infants who were turning up in the harbour, on trains and elsewhere. These innocent victims were a devastating symptom of the clash between public morality, private passion and unrelenting poverty in a fast-growing metropolis.Police tracked down Sarah Boyd, the mother of the suitcase baby, and the complex story and subsequent murder trial of Sarah and her friend Jean Olliver became a media sensation. Sociologist Tanya Bretherton masterfully tells the engrossing and moving story of the crime that put Sarah and her baby at the centre of a social tragedy that still resonates through the decades.

Hachette Books

Keep Marching

Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner
Authors:
Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner
Virago

The Seventh Cross

Anna Seghers
Authors:
Anna Seghers

Seven prisoners escape from Westhofen concentration camp. Seven crosses are erected and the commander vows to capture the fugitives within seven days. Six are caught quickly, but George Heisler slips through his pursuers' fingers and it becomes a matter of pride to track him down, no matter what. The net is closing in. Who can George trust?; who will betray him? The years have changed those he knew best: his little brother is now an SS officer; his ex-wife's house is constantly watched. Whoever aids in his escape will pay with their life. Hunted, injured and desperate, time is running out and George needs to find someone he can trust.The Seventh Cross is a powerful novel documenting the insidious beginnings of Nazi rule: the sudden imprisonments and seething paranoia.The Seventh Cross was written during the Second World War by one of the most important German writers of the twentieth century - a German Jew living in exile. Her aim, she said, was to write, 'A tale that makes it possible to get to know the many layers of fascist Germany through the fortunes of a single man.' She had four copies of the manuscript: one was destroyed in an air raid; a friend lost the second copy while fleeing the Nazis; another was found by the Gestapo; and only the fourth copy survived, sent to her publisher in America, as the writer fled from France. Published in 1942, The Seventh Cross became an immediate bestseller and is one of the only depictions of concentration camps during the Second World War.

Basic Books

The Heavens Might Crack

Jason Sokol
Authors:
Jason Sokol

Martin Luther King Jr today is an uncontroversial figure, and we tend to see him as a saint whose legacy is entirely uncomplicated. But in 1968, King was a polarizing figure, and his assassination was met with uncomfortably mixed reactions. At the time of his death, King was scorned by many white Americans, worshiped by a segment of African Americans and liberal whites, deemed irrelevant by the younger generation of African Americans, and beloved overseas. He was a hero to many. But to some, he was part of an old guard that was no longer relevant, and to others he was nothing more than a troublemaker and a threat to the Southern way of life. In The Heavens Might Crack, historian Jason Sokol traces the diverse range of reactions to King's death, exploring how Americans - as well as others across the globe--experienced King's assassination, in the days, weeks, and months afterward. He looks at everything from rioting in inner cities to turbulence in Germany, from celebrations in many parts of the South to the growing gun control movement. Across all these responses, we see one clear trend: with King gone and the cities exploding, it felt like a gear in the machinery of the universe had shifted. Just a few years prior, with the enactment of landmark civil rights laws, interracial harmony appeared conceivable; peaceful progress toward civil rights even seemed probable. In an instant, such optimism had vanished. For many, King's death extinguished that final flicker of hope for a multiracial America. With that hope gone, King's assassination would have an indelible impact on American sentiments about race, and the civil rights landscape.The Heavens Might Crack is a deeply empathetic portrait of country grappling with the death of a complicated man. By highlighting how this moment was perceived across the nation, Sokol reveals the enduring consequences King's assassination had for the shape of his own legacy, the course of the Civil Rights Movement, and race relations in America.

Abacus

Less

Andrew Sean Greer
Authors:
Andrew Sean Greer

WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE FOR FICTION 2018 A New York Times Notable Book of 2017A Washington Post Top Ten Book of 2017A San Francisco Chronicle Top Ten Book of 2017Longlisted for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence, the Lambda Award and the California Book Award'I recommend it with my whole heart' Ann Patchett'I could not love Less more' Ron Charles, Washington PostLess is the story of a 49-year-old writer, Arthur Less, who learns that his former boyfriend is about to get married. To avoid the wedding and heartbreak, he decides to embark on a trip around the world, accepting invitations to a series of half-baked lectures and literary events. From almost falling in love in Paris, almost falling to death in Berlin, to booking himself as the (only) writer on a residency in India, and an encounter in a desert with the last person on earth he wishes to see, Less is a novel about missteps, misunderstanding and mistakes.'You will sob little tears of joy' Nell Zink'Marvellously, unexpectedly, endearingly funny' Gary Shteyngart

Little, Brown

China's Great Wall of Debt

Dinny McMahon
Authors:
Dinny McMahon

The world has long considered China a juggernaut of economic strength, but since the global financial crisis, the country's economy has ballooned in size, complexity, and risk. Once dominated by four state-owned banks, the nation's financial system is a tangle of shadow banking entities, informal financial institutions, and complex corporate funding arrangements that threaten growth, stability, and reform efforts. The country has accumulated so much debt so quickly that economists increasingly predict a financial crisis that could make 'Brexit' or Greece's economic ruin seem minor, and could undermine China's ascent as a superpower. Earlier this year, President Xi Jinping issued an urgent call for reform that gives the country until 2020 to transform its economy - a vaguely-defined objective that most economists agree is unrealistic. Whether or not China will be responsible for the next global recession, as some experts forecast, the fate of its economy will have far-reaching consequences for the rest of the world. Yet the inner workings of China's financial system are still very much a mystery to most outsiders. Now more than ever, as the country's slowing economy is being felt around the globe, it is essential to understand how China allowed its economy to become so mired in debt. China's Great Wall of Debt is a penetrating examination of the country's opaque financial system and the complex factors - demographic shifts; urbanization; industrialization; a pervasive over-reliance on debt-fueled investments - that have brought the country to the brink of crisis. Anchored by stories of China's cities and its people; from factory workers and displaced farmers to government officials and entrepreneurs, the narrative will take readers inside the country's ghost cities, zombie companies, start-ups, and regulatory institutions as McMahon explains how things got so bad, why fixing the problems is so hard, and what the economic outlook means for China and for the rest of us.

Robinson

A Woman Lived Here

Allison Vale
Authors:
Allison Vale

'A pretty awesome present for the feminist in your life' - Caroline Criado Perez, OBE, author of Do It Like a WomanAt the last count, the Blue Plaque Guide honours 903 Londoners, and a walking tour of these sites brings to life the London of a bygone era. But only 111 of these blue plaques commemorate women.Over the centuries, London has been home to thousands of truly remarkable women who have made significant and lasting impacts on every aspect of modern life: from politics and social reform, to the Arts, medicine, science, technology and sport. Many of those women went largely unnoticed, even during their own lifetimes, going about their lives quietly but with courage, conviction, skill and compassion. Others were fearless, strident trail-blazers. Many lived in an era when their achievements were given a male name, clouding the capabilities of women in any field outside of the home or field. A Woman Lived Here shines a spotlight on some of these forgotten women to redress the balance. The stories on these pages commemorate some of the most remarkable of London's women, who set out to make their world a little richer, and in doing so, left an indelible mark on ours.

Hachette Australia

Killer Caldwell

Jeffrey Watson
Authors:
Jeffrey Watson

Clive 'Killer' Caldwell was a natural and brilliant pilot, a superb shot, and a born leader. He saw action against the Germans, Italians and Japanese, and remains Australia's greatest ever fighter pilot - this is his definitive biography.Born and brought up in Sydney, it was obvious from an early age that nothing would stand in Caldwell's way. He bluffed his way into the RAAF, then made sure that he was posted exactly where he thought he should be.His ability was unquestioned by all those around him, and he devised the vital 'shadow shooting' technique which contributed so much to Allied success in the air in the North African campaign, and in northern Australia. But he was never afraid of voicing his opinions to all those above and below him, be it about the training of pilots, or the equipping of Spitfires for use against the Japanese - or trying to run the show his way.Caldwell ended his military career in the Morotai Mutiny in 1945, where he and a number of other Australian pilots tried to resign their commissions in protest at not being allowed by General MacArthur - and the RAAF - to take part in the main action. And then he was embroiled in the Barry inquiry into booze smuggling by him and other pilots. KILLER CALDWELL is a colourful portrait of this colourful Australian. Now part of the HACHETTE MILITARY COLLECTION.'an outstanding airman and a popular national hero.' Australian War Memorial

Hachette Australia

Dragon and Kangaroo

Robert Macklin
Authors:
Robert Macklin

The fascinating story of the Chinese presence in and influence on this country - our intertwined history from colonial times to today.Chinese 'presence' in Australia extends from well before the time of Captain Cook - trading with northern Australia long before Europeans came here - right through to the present day, with Chinese activities ranging from being the main customer for our iron ore, to their very extensive intelligence operations here. Robert Macklin, bestselling and critically acclaimed author of HAMILTON HUME and DARK PARADISE, has traced a new history of the two nations. Macklin's engrossing narrative reaches from pre-colonial times, to John Macarthur's 'coolie' shepherds, the only Chinese bushranger, Sam Pu, and the multiple atrocities committed against the Chinese in the gold rush; through to the 20th century, where the two Australians - 'Morrison of Peking' and William Donald - played a significant role in the downfall of the last Chinese emperor and the creation of the first republic, before World War II and decades of Cold War brinkmanship; to our current economic bonds and Australia's role in the dangerous geopolitics of the South China Sea. DRAGON AND KANGAROO is an absorbing account of a vastly underestimated part of Australia's story: this is our shared history, from an immensely important - and entirely new - angle.'A well-informed, instructive, highly readable and often entertaining narrative of Australia-China relations from before the beginnings of Australia to the present day.' Stephen FitzGerald, former Australian Ambassador to China'Macklin shows how China has been an integral part of our story from the beginning.' Professor Richard Rigby, Executive Director, China Institute, Australian National University

Dialogue Books

The Leavers

Lisa Ko
Authors:
Lisa Ko
Hachette Australia

The Rag Tag Fleet

Ian W. Shaw
Authors:
Ian W. Shaw

The unknown story of how a fleet of Australian fishing boats, trawlers and schooners supplied US and Australian forces in the Pacific - and helped turn the course of World War II.Mid-1942: from China to New Guinea, the Pacific belonged to the Japanese. In this desperate situation, a fleet of hundreds of Australian small ships is assembled, sailing under the American flag, and crewed by over 3000 Australians either too young or too old to join the regular armed forces. Their task: to bring supplies and equipment to the Allied troops waging bloody battles against Japanese forces across the South Pacific. THE RAG TAG FLEET is the unknown story of the final months of 1942 - when these men ran the gauntlet of Japanese air attacks, malaria and dysentery, reefs, and shallow, shark-infested waters to support the US and Australian troops that defeated the entrenched Japanese forces at Buna on the New Guinea coast, and so helped turn the war in the Allies' favour. Their bravery, ingenuity and mettle helped turn the tide of the war. For the first time, their story is told.'enthralling . . . makes for a fascinating read.' CANBERRA TIMES

Black Dog & Leventhal

Eleanor Roosevelt: In Her Words

Eleanor Roosevelt, Nancy Woloch
Authors:
Eleanor Roosevelt, Nancy Woloch

Eleanor Roosevelt is considered by many to be the most fascinating, accomplished, and admired woman in American history. While she is best known as a politician, diplomat, humanitarian, UN delegate, activist, feminist, and First Lady she was also a prolific reporter and writer who changed the role of women in government.Roosevelt wrote twenty-seven books, more than 8,000 columns, and over 555 articles. She received an average of 175,000 letters a year while she served as first lady and delivered more than 75 speeches a year.Organized into sections like by sections like Becoming Eleanor Roosevelt, On Women, Diversity and Democracy, and the UN and Human Rights, In Her Words: Eleanor Roosevelt collects the most fascinating writings from her life including historical documents like the Universal Human Declaration of Rights, relevant commentary on sexism, racism, and immigration, intimate letters to Lorena Hickock and others, and witty self-help. Illustrated with dozens of photographs and documents, this is the perfect gift for history buffs, feminist, social activists, and anyone who is curious about the Roosevelt family.

Basic Books

Crucible of Faith

Philip Jenkins
Authors:
Philip Jenkins
Robinson

The Art of Business

Greg Clydesdale
Authors:
Greg Clydesdale

When we look at Chinese history for a guide to business, we commonly reach for Sun Tzu's The Art of War, but that is a military text. It focuses on an enemy, not a trading partner, and it certainly doesn't mention customers and their role in strategy.To come to terms with Chinese commerce, we don't need to know the Art of War. We need to know the art of business. This book explains Chinese business in history: its practices, values and achievements. As we explore business through time, we discover the strategies which enabled Chinese merchants to become rich and gain insights into how Chinese business evolved, and continues to evolve. The Art of Business goes beyond the Silk Road, Marco Polo and the opium trade to examine how the many different Chinese businesses made money. It asks how merchants mastered the spatial and temporal dimensions of the market and built substantial wealth in doing so. It explores the commercial revolutions that occurred in the Tang and Song dynasties and the late Ming, and reveals business practices carried into the Ching dynasty. It explores salt merchants, the porcelain industry, Huizhou and Shanxi merchant groups, and Howqua, who became the world's richest man. The evolving nature of world commerce will place new demands on tomorrow's businesses. By examining the past, we can better understand the future in which China will once again stand like a giant.

Robinson

Sugar

James Walvin
Authors:
James Walvin
Robinson

Nicholas II, The Last Tsar

Michael Paterson
Authors:
Michael Paterson

The character of the last Tsar, Nicholas II (1868-1918) is crucial to understanding the overthrow of tsarist Russia, the most significant event in Russian history. Nicholas became Tsar at the age of 26. Though a conscientious man who was passionate in his devotion to his country, he was weak, sentimental, dogmatic and indecisive. Ironically he could have made an effective constitutional monarch, but these flaws rendered him fatally unsuited to be the sole ruler of a nation that was in the throes of painful modernisation. That he failed is not surprising, for many abler monarchs could not have succeeded. Rather to be wondered at is that he managed, for 23 years, to hold on to power despite the overwhelming force of circumstances. Though Nicholas was exasperating, he had many endearing qualities. A modern audience, aware - as contemporaries were not - of the private pressures under which he lived, can empathise with him and forgive some of his errors of judgement. To some readers he seems a fool, to others a monster, but many are touched by the story of a well-meaning man doing his best under impossible conditions. He is, in other words, a biographical subject that engages readers whatever their viewpoint. His family was of great importance to Nicholas. He and his wife, Alexandra, married for love and retained this affection to the end of their lives. His four daughters, all different and intriguing personalities, were beautiful and charming. His son, the family's - and the nation's - hope for the future, was disabled by an illness that had to be concealed from Russia and from the world. It was this circumstance that made possible the nefarious influence of Rasputin, which in turn hastened the end of the dynasty.This story has everything: romance and tragedy, grandeur and misery, human frailty and an international catastrophe that would not only bring down the Tsar but put an end to the glittering era of European monarchies.

Basic Books

The Nazi Doctors (Revised Edition)

Robert Jay Lifton
Authors:
Robert Jay Lifton

In his most powerful and important book, renowned psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton presents a brilliant analysis of the crucial role that German doctors played in the Nazi genocide. Now updated with a new preface, The Nazi Doctors remains the definitive work on the Nazi medical atrocities, a chilling exposé of the banality of evil at its epitome, and a sobering reminder of the darkest side of human nature.

Basic Books

An Iron Wind

Peter Fritzsche
Authors:
Peter Fritzsche
Basic Books

America's Great Game

Hugh Wilford
Authors:
Hugh Wilford