Malachy McCourt and Brian McDonald - Death Need Not Be Fatal - Little, Brown Book Group

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Death Need Not Be Fatal

By Malachy McCourt and Brian McDonald

  • Hardback
  • £20.99

Before he runs out of time, Irish bon vivant MALACHY MCCOURT shares his views on death - sometimes hilarious and often poignant - and on what will or won't happen after his last breath is drawn.

In his book, DEATH NEED NOT BE FATAL, McCourt explores the role death has played and continues to play in his life and in the world. From the dead babies and starving children in the Limerick of his childhood, to Angela's famous ashes, to the deaths of McCourt's brothers Frank and Mike - and McCourt's own impending demise - the Grim Reaper has been a constant companion and reminder of what is important, and what's not.

McCourt writes that, as he draws closer to death, his perception of death has become crystal clear. When it occurs, he does not plan to pass away, pass on, or cross over. He's not going to make the supreme sacrifice or come to an untidy end; he is not going to be laid to rest, meet his maker, or go to his eternal reward. He is not going to breath his last, bite the dust, kick the bucket, or buy the farm; he's not going to turn up his toes, join the silent majority, become a landowner, take a dirt nap, push up daisies, play a harp, take a taxi, give up his ghost, feed the worms, enter the sweet hereafter, or shuffle off the mortal coil.

He plans to die.

Biographical Notes

MALACHY MCCOURT was born in Brooklyn, New York in 1931, but grew up in Limerick, Ireland. He returned to the United States at the age of 20 where he says he "did a bit of dishwashing, long-shoring, military service, bartending, stage acting, and saloon owning." His greatest achievement of all is his 51-year marriage to his wife, Diana, who has blessed him with five children and eight grandchildren.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781478917069
  • Publication date: 27 Jul 2017
  • Page count: 288
  • Imprint: Center Street
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