Melissa Katsoulis - The Secret Life of Husbands - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781472129918
    • Publication date:16 May 2019

The Secret Life of Husbands

Everything You Need to Know About the Man in Your Life

By Melissa Katsoulis

  • Hardback
  • £12.99

A journey of discovery about the modern-day husband, The Secret Life of Husbands will tell you everything you need to know about the man in your life.

What do our husbands talk about with their friends? How do they feel about #MeToo? What do they think about when they're chopping onions? What do they really do online? Do they obsessively reflect on relationships past, present and future? Are they bored at weddings? Do they fancy Fiona Bruce?

Journalist Melissa Katsoulis is dying to find out. Now, with masculinity in crisis (again), it's more relevant than ever to understand the secret lives of husbands. Couldn't our gender power-struggles be better understood if we listened, impartially, to how the world looks from inside a man's head? Do they feel sad at the thought of never falling in love again? Would they ever admit that their partner's cooking is worse than their mother's?

Melissa's mission in this book is not to find the perfect husband, or the worst. She wants to talk to married men and understand their world. We are inundated with statistical research about gender and domestic politics but it doesn't tell us how things really feel to real men. Melissa will interview ordinary men everywhere, taking us on a whistle-stop tour of husbands through history, and covering topics such as husbands in the nursery and husbands down the aisle, to husbands and their friends and husbands on holiday. A journey of discovery about the modern-day husband, The Secret Life of Husbands will tell you everything you need to know about the man in your life.

Biographical Notes

Melissa Katsoulis is a journalist, and the author of Telling Tales: A History of Literary Hoaxes. Since joining The Times books desk twenty years ago, she has continued to be a regular reviewer for various national newspapers.
She divides her time between London, where she lives with her beloved cat (and husband and children), and Greece, where she spends several months each year complaining about the heat, and getting back to her roots by watching telly all day and shouting at dogs.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781472129932
  • Publication date: 16 May 2019
  • Page count: 192
  • Imprint: Constable
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