Lauren Leader-Chivée - Crossing the Thinnest Line - Little, Brown Book Group

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Crossing the Thinnest Line

How Embracing Diversity - from the Office to the Oscars - Makes America Stronger

By Lauren Leader-Chivée

  • Paperback
  • £12.99

Will diversity be a source of growth, prosperity, and progress-or perpetual division and strife?

FROM THE VERY FOUNDING OF OUR NATION, diversity has been one of our greatest strengths but also the greatest source of conflict. In less than a generation, America will become "minority-majority," and the world economy, already interconnected, will be even more globalized. The stakes for how we handle this evolution couldn't be higher. Will diversity be a source of growth, prosperity, and progress-or perpetual division and strife?

America has the potential to realize huge gains economically and socially by more fully capitalizing on diversity, but significant challenges remain and it's a problem that all Americans should be focused on solving. Despite tremendous progress, women and minorities still face barriers to accessing the full promise of the American dream. It doesn't have to be this way. Many of the solutions are right in front of us, and many exceptional, committed Americans are doing their part to make a difference.

In the twenty-first century, nations will prosper only insofar as they embrace and celebrate the individuals, organizations, and collective efforts to advance every kind of diversity. Lauren Leader-Chivée believes America must lead the way. In CROSSING THE THINNEST LINE, she explores the state of our diverse union and shares important stories of progress and potential, highlighting those who are crossing dividing lines of race, gender, culture, and political party to build a more united and prosperous nation. Her revelations will transform the discussion and set the agenda for America's progress on these critical issues. A work of originality and ambition, CROSSING THE THINNEST LINE changes our understanding of diversity and offers lessons to change our lives and our country.

Biographical Notes

LAUREN LEADER-CHIVÉE is an author, activist, and an expert and advisor on diversity and women's issues. She was recently named one of Fortune's 50 Most Influential Women on Twitter. She is founder and CEO of All In Together, a nonprofit campaign dedicated to engaging American women in politics and civic action.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781455539048
  • Publication date: 28 Dec 2017
  • Page count: 336
  • Imprint: Center Street
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