Charles Allen - Coromandel - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781408705407
    • Publication date:02 Nov 2017

Coromandel

A Personal History of South India

By Charles Allen

  • Hardback
  • £25.00

A fascinating exploration of the roots of Indian history by the acclaimed author of Ashoka.

COROMANDEL. A name which has been long applied by Europeans to the Northern Tamil Country, or (more comprehensively) to the eastern coast of the Peninsula of India.

This is the India highly acclaimed historian Charles Allen visits in this fascinating book. Coromandel journeys south, exploring the less well known, often neglected and very different history and identity of the pre-Aryan Dravidian south.

During Allen's exploration of the Indian south he meets local historians, gurus and politicians and with their help uncovers some extraordinary stories about the past. His sweeping narrative takes in the archaeology, religion, linguistics and anthropology of the region - and how these have influenced contemporary politics.

Known for his vivid storytelling, for decades Allen has travelled the length and breadth of India, revealing the spirit of the sub-continent through its history and people. In Coromandel, he moves through modern-day India, discovering as much about the present as he does about the past.

Biographical Notes

Charles Allen is the author of a number of bestselling books about India and the colonial experience elsewhere. He is a traveller, historian and master storyteller.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781408705391
  • Publication date: 02 Nov 2017
  • Page count: 432
  • Imprint: Little, Brown
Coromandel is lively and its stories well chosen — The Economist
An engaging and meaningful account of a very long and complex history — Times Literary Supplement
A writer whom India as well as Britain should be proud to call its own, this account is seductive and convincing — Literary Review
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