Jane Harper - The Lost Man - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9781408711835
    • Publication date:07 Feb 2019
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    • Publication date:07 Feb 2019
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    • ISBN:9781408708224
    • Publication date:23 Oct 2018

The Lost Man

By Jane Harper
Read by Stephen Shanahan

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Three brothers. One death. No answers.

The Sunday Times Top Ten Bestseller

The 'gripping, atmospheric and ultimately deeply satisfying' (Val McDermid) new novel from Jane Harper, author of the Sunday Times top ten bestsellers - with combined sales of over a half a million copies - The Dry and Force of Nature.

He had started to remove his clothes as logic had deserted him, and his skin was cracked. Whatever had been going through Cameron's mind when he was alive, he didn't look peaceful in death.

Two brothers meet at the remote border of their vast cattle properties under the unrelenting sun of the outback. In an isolated part of Australia, they are each other's nearest neighbour, their homes hours apart.

They are at the stockman's grave, a landmark so old that no one can remember who is buried there. But today, the scant shadow it casts was the last hope for their middle brother, Cameron. The Bright family's quiet existence is thrown into grief and anguish.

Something had been troubling Cameron. Did he choose to walk to his death? Because if he didn't, the isolation of the outback leaves few suspects...

What readers are saying:

'Jane Harper is an incredible story teller'

'So good I couldn't put it down and finished it too quickly!'

'I could almost taste the dust and feel the relentless heat'

'Take a duvet day off work and read it cover to cover. You won't be disappointed!'



Biographical Notes

Jane Harper is the author of the international bestsellers The Dry and Force of Nature. Her books are published in more than 36 territories worldwide, and The Dry is being made into a major film starring Eric Bana. Jane has won numerous top awards including the CWA Gold Dagger Award for Best Crime Novel, the British Book Awards Crime and Thriller Book of the Year, the Australian Book Industry Awards Book of the Year and the Australian Indie Awards Book of the Year. Jane worked as a print journalist for thirteen years both in Australia and the UK and now lives in Melbourne.

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  • ISBN: 9781405535175
  • Publication date: 23 Oct 2018
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Hachette Audio
Harper secures her place as queen of outback noir with this haunting family mystery — Sunday Times Crime Club, star pick
In just a couple of years, Jane Harper has soared into the first rank of contemporary crime writers. The Lost Man... returns to the parched landscape she used to such powerful effect in her debut, The Dry... Three generations of women - the dead man's mother, wife and daughters - struggle to come to terms with terrible events, and the family's shocking history holds the key to this superb murder mystery — Sunday Times
Another splendid slice of outback noir...Fabulously atmospheric, the book starts slowly and gradually picks up pace towards a jaw-dropping denouement — Guardian, Best Recent Crime and Thrillers
A third superb novel from the author of bestseller The Dry . . . Harper's intricate, beautifully woven mystery...sucks you into a world where nothing is ever what it seems and everyone has secrets . . . Told with mesmerising skill, it is a compelling portrait of isolation and the strain it exerts on even the strongest character. A little masterpiece — Daily Mail
Like its precursors, The Dry and Force of Nature, The Lost Man is a gripping mystery that drips with atmosphere (and sweat). This time, though, Harper has added an emotional heft that is deeply moving. It is her best book yet — Evening Standard
A riveting, deeply atmospheric read — Mail on Sunday
Harper's writing creates a vivid sense of place . . . She tells a disturbing tale, not just of death but also of domestic violence, sexual abuse, hidden secrets and shattered families — Daily Express
The very definition of a slow burn, this is much like the land in which it is set - spartan, atmospheric, and really quite beautiful — Heat Magazine, Read of the Week
Harper's crisp, evocative writing expertly reveals the secrets that have been festering too long in the scorching Australian sun — Metro
Harper's The Lost Man is storytelling at its finest — Daily Mail USA
I read it in 24 hours. It's gripping, atmospheric and ultimately deeply satisfying — Val McDermid
I absolutely loved The Lost Man. I devoured it in a day. Her best yet! — Liane Moriarty
The very definition of a slow burn, this is much like the land in which it is set - spartan, atmospheric, and really quite beautiful — Heat
Another splendid slice of outback noir . . . Fabulously atmospheric, the book starts slowly and gradually picks up pace towards a jaw-dropping denouement — Guardian (Books of the Month)
An evocative, sharply written and expertly plotted novel, subtle in how it navigates its themes of misogyny, retribution and guilt — Irish Independent
Even better than The Dry. It's so compelling and hypnotic. The setting, the heat, the characters and the pace at which it unravels - just so, so good — Sabine Durrant
I don't have words for how much I loved it. Her other two books were amazing, but this is in a different league. It totally transcends genre, and it should win all the prizes — Marian Keyes
A compelling psychological thriller set against the remorseless sun of the Australian outback, I read it in one sitting, completely immersed in the building tension as a man confronts his family's dark past after the discovery of his brother's body — Harriet Tyce, author of Blood Orange
The Lost Man is wonderful. Even better than The Dry, making brilliant use of the parched outback as well as an isolated family over an Australian Christmas. Hugely recommended - though be warned, it's even more addictive than Lee Child — Amanda Craig
The Lost Man is a compulsive, gripping read from start to finish with an atmosphere you can cut with a knife. I was absolutely blown away by it — Kate Hamer
The novel shimmers with the heat of the Australian outback. I was mesmerised by this extraordinary vast brutal place and Harper's minutely observed, subtle and nuanced story within it — Rosamund Lupton
I loved this hugely atmospheric thriller with beautifully-drawn characters — Laura Marshall
Jane Harper certainly nails the Australian Outback - you can feel the heat come off the page in waves . . . Harper's crisp, evocative writing expertly reveals the secrets that have been festering too long in the scorching Australian sun — Metro
Having read Jane's other books I was expecting great things from this - nice to be proved right...Jane writes so convincingly about the oppressive heat of the outback that you feel you're there — Woman's Way
Nothing about this novel is predictable. The characters are compelling, the plot is thrilling and the ending is so very satisfying. There's something special about getting to the end of a book and figuring out the mystery. You'll be left feeling content, a little shocked and desperate for more — Marie Claire (Australia)
Jane Harper's third novel seals her spot as one of the best...Like the country it describes, this is a "big" book, and one likely to cement Harper's place as one of the most interesting Australian crime writers to emerge in the past decade. Her sense of place is acute, but it is her attention to the relationships that are shaped by this unforgiving, magnificent landscape that will linger long after the mystery of stockman's grave is finally revealed — Sydney Morning Herald
"f you liked The Dry, you'll love it. The Lost Man is an even better book, gripping right to the end. This terrific piece of outback noir opens with the discovery of a body...Harper...paints the menacing landscape brilliantly. The book's title could easily relate to several of the male characters. This engrossing novel will have you thinking long after you've turned the last page — Herald Sun (Aus)
The Lost Man, like The Dry, is a study in isolation and its psychological and physical effects — New York Times
Harper's masterful narrative places readers right in the middle of a desolate landscape that's almost as alien as the moon's surface, where the effects of long-term isolation are always a concern. The mystery of Cam's death is at the dark heart of an unfolding family drama that will leave readers reeling, and the final reveal is a heartbreaker. A twisty slow burner by an author at the top of her game — Kirkus starred review
Jane Harper is at the top of the crime writing genre along with Attica Locke, Megan Abbott, and Tana French...[The Lost Man] slowly builds into one hell of a mystery! I will drop whatever I am doing to read a Jane Harper crime novel — BookRiot
Harper's sinewy prose and flinty characters compel...Jaw-dropping denouement — Publishers Weekly
The atmosphere is so thick you can taste the red-clay dust, and the folklore surrounding the mysterious stockman adds an additional edge to an already dark and intense narrative. The truth is revealed in a surprising ending that reveals how far someone will go to preserve a life worth living in a place at once loathed and loved — Booklist
The fantastic Jane Harper's third novel marks a highly anticipated return to the intense setting of the Australian outback — St Albans Review
A good crime writer creates a great sense of place and bestselling author Jane Harper is no exception. In her atmospheric third novel, the Australian outback is more than just a backdrop to the story, indeed it is the murder weapon itself — Hampshire Living
Against an unforgiving landscape, Harper's story has the qualities of an epic, its plot specific, its themes universal — Belfast Telegraph
In seemingly no time Jane Harper has gone from excellent debut to consistent brilliance — Weekend Sport
The fantastic Jane Harper's third novel marks a highly anticipated return to the intense setting of the Australian outback — Watford Observer
Jane Harper has gone from excellent debut to consistent brilliant — Weekend Sport
The pace is frenetic, the landscape epic and the red herrings so cleverly placed that your prime suspect changes by the chapter — Nottingham Post

English-born but raised in Australia, Jane Harper has used that continent's unique landscape, climate and mood to sterling effect in her series of crime stories. The latest, The Lost Man, is her best yet; it's certainly one of the finest novels of any sort, not only within the genre, that I've read in many moons . . . The vivid
descriptions really transplant the reader to the outback . . . Most of all, you get a sense of the sheer, incomprehensible hugeness - and otherness - of the outback: though by the end, it remains as much of a mystery as any unexplained death

— Darragh McManus, Independent

Harper's debut, The Dry, centred on the horrific murder of a family in a hot, remote Australian town.
Her follow-up, Force of Nature, moved the setting to the bushland, where a woman goes missing on a
corporate retreat. The landscape of The Lost Man is even more hostile, even more alien and beautiful, as Harper deftly manipulates her small but fully realised cast to a conclusion

— The Observer
Nathan is the nearest thing to a detective in the novel, but Harper is much too sophisticated a writer to set up clues and red herrings and have him chasing the truth in the traditional way. Instead, she shows with great skill how he deals with his own failures and hellish loneliness, while at the same time coming to understand what has been going on with the rest of the family in the house where he grew up. Harper's first novel, The Dry, won many awards, but this one is even better. Her depiction of the extraordinary landscape is superb, as is her account of the psychological and emotional burdens it imposes on the people who try to make a living within it — Literary Review
The pace is frenetic, the landscape epic and the red herrings so cleverly placed that your prime suspect changes by the chapter — Woman's Way
Little, Brown

Force of Nature

Jane Harper
Authors:
Jane Harper

The gripping new novel from the author of the Sunday Times top ten bestseller, Waterstones Thriller of the Month, Sunday Times Crime Book of the Month, and Simon Mayo Radio 2 Book Club Choice, The Dry. FIVE WENT OUT. FOUR CAME BACK...Is Alice here? Did she make it? Is she safe? In the chaos, in the night, it was impossible to say which of the four had asked after Alice's welfare. Later, when everything got worse, each would insist it had been them.Five women reluctantly pick up their backpacks and start walking along the muddy track. Only four come out the other side.The hike through the rugged landscape is meant to take the office colleagues out of their air-conditioned comfort zone and teach resilience and team building. At least that is what the corporate retreat website advertises.Federal Police Agent Aaron Falk has a particularly keen interest in the whereabouts of the missing bushwalker. Alice Russell is the whistleblower in his latest case - and Alice knew secrets. About the company she worked for and the people she worked with.Far from the hike encouraging teamwork, the women tell Falk a tale of suspicion, violence and disintegrating trust. And as he delves into the disappearance, it seems some dangers may run far deeper than anyone knew

Abacus

The Dry

Jane Harper
Authors:
Jane Harper

Jane Harper's new novel, The Lost Man, is out now.'One of the most stunning debuts I've ever read...Read it!' David BaldacciWINNER OF THE BRITISH BOOK AWARDS CRIME THRILLER BOOK OF THE YEAR 2018WINNER OF THE CWA GOLD DAGGER AWARD 2017Amazon.com's #1 Pick for Best Mystery & Thriller 2017'Packed with sneaky moves and teasing possibilities that keep the reader guessing...The Dry is a breathless page-turner' Janet Maslin, New York TimesWHO REALLY KILLED THE HADLER FAMILY?I just can't understand how someone like him could do something like that.Amid the worst drought to ravage Australia in a century, it hasn't rained in small country town Kiewarra for two years. Tensions in the community become unbearable when three members of the Hadler family are brutally murdered. Everyone thinks Luke Hadler, who committed suicide after slaughtering his wife and six-year-old son, is guilty.Policeman Aaron Falk returns to the town of his youth for the funeral of his childhood best friend, and is unwillingly drawn into the investigation. As questions mount and suspicion spreads through the town, Falk is forced to confront the community that rejected him twenty years earlier. Because Falk and Luke Hadler shared a secret, one which Luke's death threatens to unearth. And as Falk probes deeper into the killings, secrets from his past and why he left home bubble to the surface as he questions the truth of his friend's crime.

Alan Lightman

Alan Lightman - who worked for many years as a theoretical physicist - is the author of six novels, including the international bestseller Einstein's Dreams, as well as The Diagnosis, a finalist for the National Book Award. He is also the author of a memoir, three collections of essays, and several books on science. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, Granta, Harper's Magazine, The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and Nature, among other publications. He has taught at Harvard and at MIT, where he was the first person to receive a dual faculty appointment in science and the humanities. He lives in the Boston area.

Alex Gray

Alex Gray was born and educated in Glasgow. After studying English and Philosophy at the University of Strathclyde, she worked as a visiting officer for the DHSS, a time she looks upon as postgraduate education since it proved a rich source of character studies. She then trained as a secondary school teacher of English. Alex began writing professionally in 1993 and had immediate success with short stories, articles and commissions for BBC radio programmes. She has been awarded the Scottish Association of Writers' Constable and Pitlochry trophies for her crime writing. A regular on the Scottish bestseller lists, her previous novels include Five Ways to Kill a Man, Glasgow Kiss, Pitch Black, The Riverman, Never Somewhere Else, The Swedish Girl and Keep the Midnight Out. She is the co-founder of the international Scottish crime writing festival, Bloody Scotland, which had its inaugural year in 2012.

Ali McNamara

Ali McNamara attributes her over-active and very vivid imagination to one thing - being an only child. Time spent dreaming up adventures when she was young has left her with a head bursting with stories waiting to be told.When stories she wrote for fun on Ronan Keating's website became so popular they were sold as a fundraising project for his cancer awareness charity, Ali realised that not only was writing something she enjoyed doing, but something others enjoyed reading too. Ali lives in Cambridgeshire with her family and two Labradors. When she isn't writing, she likes to travel, read, and people-watch, more often than not accompanied by a good cup of coffee. Her dogs and a love of exercise keep her sane!To find out more about Ali visit her website: www.alimcnamara.co.uk or follow her on Twitter: @AliMcNamara

Antonia White

Antonia White (1899-1980) was educated at the Convent of the Sacred Heart at Roehampton before going to St Paul's School for Girls and training for the stage at RADA. From 1924 until the Second World War she worked as a journalist. Among numerous volumes of short stories, fiction and autobiography, Antonia White published a celebrated quartet of novels linked by their heroine: Frost in May (1922), The Lost Traveller (1950), The Sugar House (1952) and Beyond the Glass (1954).

Colson Whitehead

Colson Whitehead is the Sunday Times bestselling author of The Underground Railroad, The Noble Hustle, Zone One, Sag Harbor, The Intuitionist, John Henry Days, Apex Hides the Hurt, and one collection of essays, The Colossus of New York. A Pulitzer Prize winner and a recipient of MacArthur and Guggenheim fellowships, he lives in New York City.

Derek Wilson

DEREK WILSON is a renowned Tudor historian. A graduate of Peterhouse, Cambridge, he has written over 50 critically acclaimed books including A Brief History of the Circumnavigators, and The Uncrowned Kings of England, as well as recent biographies of Charlemagne and Holbein.He is a writer and presenter for radio and television and is also the founder of the Cambridge History festival. He lives in North Devon. Visit his website: www.derekwilson.com

Elizabeth Chadwick

Much of Elizabeth Chadwick's research is carried out as a member of Regia Anglorum, an early mediaeval re-enactment society with emphasis on accurately re-creating the past. She also tutors in the skill of writing historial and romantic fiction. She won a Betty Trask Award for The Wild Hunt and has been shortlisted for the RNA Awards four times.

Emma Blair

Emma Blair was a pen name for Scottish actor and author Iain Blair, who began writing in his spare time and whose first novel, Where No Man Cries, was published in 1982. During a writing career spanning three decades he produced some thirty novels, but his true identity remained a secret until 1998 when his novel Flower of Scotland was nominated for the RNA Romantic Novel of the Year award. He was one of Britain's most popular authors and his books among the most borrowed from libraries. Iain Blair died in July 2011.

Emma Fraser

Emma Fraser emigrated to Africa with her Gaelic-speaking parents when she was nine years old and remembers lying in bed and listening to her father playing the bagpipes. She returned to the Western Isles of Scotland years later and went on to qualify as a nurse, working in Edinburgh and Glasgow before leaving to study English Literature at Aberdeen University. Emma began writing when her daughters started school and she has published three historical novels, two of which were shortlisted for the Romantic Novel of the Year Award. Her third book, The Shipbuilder's Daughter, was inspired by, as always, true events - this time by the Glasgow shipyards where her grandfather once worked.Keep up to date with Emma by following her on Twitter (@EmmaFraserBooks) or becoming her friend on Facebook (www.facebook.com/emmafraserauthor).

Eva Woods

Eva Woods grew up in a small Irish village and now lives in London, where she dodges urban foxes and tuts at tourists on escalators. She runs the UK's first writing course for commercial novels and regularly teaches creative writing.

Gabrielle Zevin

Gabrielle Zevin was raised by parents who took her to the library like it was church. She suspects that is why she became a writer. Her career began at age fourteen when an angry letter to her local newspaper about a Guns 'n' Roses concert resulted in a job as a music critic. Over eight novels for adults and young people, she has written about female soldiers in Iraq, mafia princesses in retro-future New York City, teenage girls in the afterlife, talking dogs, amnesiacs, and the difficulties of loving one person over many years. Her last novel, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry, was a New York Times bestseller.

Gilly Macmillan

Gilly Macmillan is the New York Times bestselling author of What She Knew and The Perfect Girl. She trained as an art historian and worked at The Burlington Magazine and the Hayward Gallery before starting a family. Since then she's worked as a lecturer in photography, and now writes full-time. She resides in Bristol, England.

Hailey Edwards

Hailey Edwards writes about questionable applications of otherwise perfectly good magic, the transformative power of love, the family you choose for yourself, and blowing stuff up. Not necessarily all at once. That could get messy. She lives in Alabama with her husband, their daughter, and a herd of dachshunds.Visit her website at www.haileyedwards.net

Harry Brett

Harry Brett is a pseudonym for Henry Sutton, who is the author of nine previous novels including My Criminal World and Get Me Out Of Here. He also co-authored the DS Jack Frost novel, First Frost, under the pseudonym James Henry. His work has been translated into many languages. His fifth novel, Kids' Stuff, received an Arts Council Writers' Award in 2002, and became a long-running stage play in Riga, Latvia.He has judged numerous literary prizes, including the John Lewellyn Rhys Prize and the Theakstons Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year. He has been the Literary Editor of Esquire magazine and the Books Editor of the Daily Mirror. He teaches Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia, where he is a Senior Lecturer and the director of the new Creative Writing MA Crime Fiction. He lives in Norwich with his family.

J. Courtney Sullivan

J. COURTNEY SULLIVAN is the New York Times best-selling author of the novels The Engagements, Maine, and Commencement. Maine was named a 2011 Time magazine Best Book of the Year and a Washington Post Notable Book. The Engagements was one of People Magazine's Top Ten Books of 2013 and an Irish Times Best Book of the Year, and has been translated into seventeen languages. She has contributed to The New York Times Book Review, the Chicago Tribune, New York magazine, Elle, Glamour, Allure, Real Simple, and O: The Oprah Magazine, among many other publications. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

J.D. Barrett

J.D. Barrett is an Australian television writer and producer with a passion for good food and creating great meals. She has worked on the writing teams for Love My Way, East of Everything, Bed of Roses and Wonderland and worked as a writer/producer on The Story of Australia. She lives between Sydney, Byron Bay and Los Angeles. THE SECRET RECIPE FOR SECOND CHANCESis her debut novel and she is currently working on her next book.

J. R. Ward

After graduating from law school J.R. Ward began working in health care in Boston and spent many years as chief of staff for one of the premier academic medical centres in the US. She lives in Kentucky with her husband.

Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch's first novel, White Oleander, a #1 bestseller and Oprah's Book Club selection, has been translated into 24 languages and was made into a feature film. Her most recent novel, Paint It Black, hit bestseller lists across the country and has also been made into a film. She lives in Los Angeles.