Vera Brittain - Testament Of Youth - Little, Brown Book Group

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  • Paperback
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    • ISBN:9780349005928
    • Publication date:06 Nov 2014
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    • ISBN:9780349010274
    • Publication date:07 Jun 2018
Books in this series

Testament Of Youth

An Autobiographical Study of the Years 1900-1925

By Vera Brittain

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

* A unique record of one woman's experience of twenty-five of the most cataclysmic years in modern history - and a Virago Classic bestseller - with a new introduction by Mark Bostridge

In 1914 Vera Brittain was eighteen and, as war was declared, she was preparing to study at Oxford. Four years later her life - and the life of her whole generation - had changed in a way that was unimaginable in the tranquil pre-war era.

TESTAMENT OF YOUTH, one of the most famous autobiographies of the First World War, is Brittain's account of how she survived the period; how she lost the man she loved; how she nursed the wounded and how she emerged into an altered world. A passionate record of a lost generation, it made Vera Brittain one of the best-loved writers of her time.

Biographical Notes

Vera Brittain (1893-1970) grew up in the north of England. At the end of the war she moved to Oxford where she met Winifred Holtby, author of SOUTH RIDING.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780860680352
  • Publication date: 20 Apr 1978
  • Page count: 640
  • Imprint: Virago
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