Ben Miller - The Aliens Are Coming! - Little, Brown Book Group

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    • ISBN:9780748128518
    • Publication date:04 Feb 2016

The Aliens Are Coming!

The Exciting and Extraordinary Science Behind Our Search for Life in the Universe

By Ben Miller

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

Discover the fascinating and cutting-edge science behind the greatest question of all: is there life beyond Earth? The brand-new book from bestselling science writer and comedian Ben Miller

Discover the fascinating and cutting-edge science behind the greatest question of all: is there life beyond Earth?

For millennia, we have looked up at the stars and wondered whether we are alone in the universe. In the last few years, scientists have made huge strides towards answering that question. In The Aliens are Coming!, comedian and bestselling science writer Ben Miller takes us on a fantastic voyage of discovery, from the beginnings of life on earth to the very latest search for alien intelligence.

What soon becomes clear is that the hunt for extra-terrestrials is also an exploration of what we actually mean by life. What do you need to kickstart life? How did the teeming energy of the Big Bang end up as frogs, trees and quantity surveyors? How can evolution provide clues about alien life? What might it look like? (Probably not green and sexy, sadly.)

As our probes and manned missions venture out into the solar system, and our telescopes image Earth-like planets with ever-increasing accuracy, our search for alien life has never been more exciting - or better funded. The Aliens are Coming! is a comprehensive, accessible and hugely entertaining guide to that search, and our quest to understand the very nature of life itself.

Biographical Notes

Ben Miller is, like you, a mutant ape living through an Ice Age on a ball of molten iron, orbiting a supermassive black hole. He is also an actor, comedian and approximately one half of Armstrong & Miller. He's presented a BBC Horizon documentary on temperature and a Radio 4 series about the history of particle physics, and wrote a regular science column in The Times. He is slowly coming to terms with the idea that he may never be an astronaut.

@ActualBenMiller

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780751545043
  • Publication date: 16 Mar 2017
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: Sphere
A lively, thoughtful look at a scientific frontier that captures our imagination while posing a serious moral question about our responsibilities as citizens of the universe — Kirkus
Miller covers a lot of ground with humor and insight . . . Pop science readers will have fun with this energetic look at the hunt for alien life — Publishers Weekly
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