Patricia Barnes-Svarney - Asteroid - Little, Brown Book Group

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Asteroid

Earth Destroyer Or New Frontier?

By Patricia Barnes-Svarney

  • Paperback
  • £14.99

A look at the creation and composition of asteroids and the frightening eventuality of a collision with the earth.

A look at the creation and composition of asteroids and the frightening eventuality of a collision with the earth.

Biographical Notes

Patricia Barnes-Svarney is the editor/writer of the award-winning New York Public Library Science Desk Reference. She has published more than 350 articles in such magazines as Popular Science, Astronomy, Omni, and Air & Space.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780738208855
  • Publication date: 03 Jul 2003
  • Page count: 304
  • Imprint: Basic Books
Little, Brown

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Basic Books

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Basic Books

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Basic Books

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PublicAffairs

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Authors:
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Basic Books

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