Duncan McNab - Roger Rogerson - Little, Brown Book Group

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  • Paperback £14.99
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    • ISBN:9780733634505
    • Publication date:23 Feb 2017

Roger Rogerson

By Duncan McNab

  • Paperback
  • £12.99

From decorated policeman to convicted criminal - the inside story of Roger Rogerson.

The verdict is guilty.

On 20 May 2014, former New South Wales police officers Roger Rogerson and Glen McNamara murdered student Jamie Gao in cold blood. Both have been found guilty of murder and possession of 2.78 kilograms of methamphetamine, and sentenced to life imprisonment.

But this wasn't Rogerson's first trial or conviction. Once one of the most highly decorated police officers in New South Wales, he was dismissed from the police force in 1986, and jailed twice.

That was just the tip of the iceberg.

This is the eye-opening account of Rogerson's life of crime - policing it and committing it - and reveals the full story of one of the most corrupt and evil men in Australia, and the events that led inexorably to the chilling murder of Jamie Gao in storage unit 803.

Biographical Notes

Duncan McNab is a former police detective, private investigator, investigative journalist and media adviser to government and the private sector. He is the author of over seven books, including the phenomenally bestselling OUTLAW BIKERS IN AUSTRALIA. In 2015 he wrote WATERFRONT, lifting the lid on the crime, politics, violence and corruption that has always been present on Australia's waterfront. For ROGER ROGERSON, he sat in the Gao murder trial courtroom for eighteen weeks and has been following Rogerson's career - on both sides of the law - for over 30 years.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780733639357
  • Publication date: 28 Dec 2017
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: Hachette Australia
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