Roland Perry - The Changi Brownlow - Little, Brown Book Group

The Changi Brownlow

An inspirational story of the Aussie spirit

By Roland Perry

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

This is the moving, powerful and compelling story of a group of Australian POWs who organise an Australian Rules Football competition under the worst conditions imaginable - inside Changi prison. Now part of the HACHETTE MILITARY COLLECTION.

'This book is a must'
COURIER-MAIL

After Singapore falls to the Japanese early in 1942, 70,000 prisoners including 15,000 Australians, are held as POWs at the notorious Changi prison, Singapore. To amuse themselves and fellow inmates, a group of sportsmen led by the indefatigable and popular 'Chicken' Smallhorn, created an Australian Football League, complete with tribunal, selection panel, umpires and coaches. The final game of the one and only season attracted 10,000 spectators, and a unique Brownlow Medal was awarded.

Meet the main characters behind this spectacle: Peter Chitty, the farm hand from Snowy River country with unfathomable physical and mental fortitude, and one of eight in his immediate family who volunteered to fight and serve in WW2; 'Chicken' Smallhorn, the Brownlow Medal-winning little man with the huge heart; and 'Weary' Dunlop, the courageous doctor, who cares for the POWs as they endure malnutrition, disease and often inhuman treatment.

This is a story of courage and the invincibility of the human spirit, and the Australian love of sport. Now part of the HACHETTE MILITARY COLLECTION.

Biographical Notes

Roland Perry is an award-winning author, journalist and documentary-maker, best known for his writing on Australian military and sporting history. His books include BRADMAN'S INVINCIBLES, THE FIGHT FOR AUSTRALIA, MONASH: THE OUTSIDER WHO WON THE WAR, THE AUSTRALIAN LIGHT HORSE, THE CHANGI BROWNLOW, biographies of cricketers Keith Miller and Shane Warne, his highly praised life of DON BRADMAN, as well as the recent bestsellers BILL THE BASTARD and HORRIE THE WAR DOG. Roland Perry was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia, for services to literature, in 2011. For more information visit rolandperryauthor.com

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780733634581
  • Publication date: 24 Nov 2016
  • Page count: 400
  • Imprint: Hachette Australia
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