Robyn Kienzle - The Architect of Kokoda - Little, Brown Book Group

The Architect of Kokoda

Bert Kienzle - The Man Who Made the Kokoda Trail

By Robyn Kienzle

  • Paperback
  • £15.99

The legendary story of Kokoda has a special significance for all Australians, and this book tells a unique part of it for the very first time. Until now, no one has told the story of Bert Kienzle, and the utterly vital role he played in the campaign.

If one person 'made' the Kokoda Track - that man was Bert Kienzle. Part Samoan and German/English, born in Fiji and raised in Germany and Australia, he was managing a rubber plantation and gold mine in Papua New Guinea at the outbreak of World War II. He
surveyed and established the Track, and spent more time on it than anyone else throughout the campaign - managing and organising the delivery of supplies and men along it.
A unique story of a very special part of Australian history, told by his daughter-in-law with unique access to the central character, and access to all his records and photos. This is the untold story of a true Australian war hero.

Biographical Notes

Robyn Kienzle is Bert Kienzle's daughter-in-law. She is a teacher and she and her husband also run a trekking company which takes people along the Kokoda Track.
Her husband works closely with the Australian War Memorial on the history of the Track and Papua New Guinea.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780733630262
  • Publication date: 27 Feb 2014
  • Page count: 368
  • Imprint: Hachette Australia
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