Derrick Bell - Faces at the Bottom of the Well - Little, Brown Book Group

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  • Paperback £12.99
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    • ISBN:9781541645530
    • Publication date:29 Nov 2018

Faces at the Bottom of the Well

The Permanence of Racism

By Derrick Bell

  • Paperback
  • £13.99

The noted civil rights activist uses allegory and historical example to present a radical vision of the persistence of racism in America. These essays shed light on some of the most perplexing and vexing issues of our day: affirmative action, the disparity between civil rights law and reality, the racist outbursts" of some black leaders, the temptation toward violent retaliation, and much more.

The noted civil rights activist uses allegory and historical example to present a radical vision of the persistence of racism in America. These essays shed light on some of the most perplexing and vexing issues of our day: affirmative action, the disparity between civil rights law and reality, the racist outbursts" of some black leaders, the temptation toward violent retaliation, and much more.

Biographical Notes

Derrick Bell, a visiting professor at New York University Law School, was dismissed by Harvard University from his position as Weld Professor of Law for refusing to end his two-year leave through which he protested the absence of minority women on the law faculty. He is also the author of Faces at the Bottom of the Well, Confronting Authority, and And We Are Not Saved.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780465068142
  • Publication date: 06 Oct 1993
  • Page count: 240
  • Imprint: Basic Books
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