David B. Woolner - The Last 100 Days - Little, Brown Book Group

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The Last 100 Days

FDR at War and at Peace

By David B. Woolner

  • Hardback
  • £25.00

A revealing portrait of the end of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's life and presidency, shedding new light on how he made his momentous final policy decisions

A revealing portrait of the end of Franklin Roosevelt's life and presidency, shedding new light on how he made his momentous final policy decisions

The first hundred days of FDR's presidency are justly famous, a period of political action without equal in American history. Yet as historian David B. Woolner reveals, the last hundred might very well surpass them in drama and consequence.

Drawing on new evidence, Woolner shows how FDR called on every ounce of his diminishing energy to pursue what mattered most to him: the establishment of the United Nations, the reinvigoration of the New Deal, and the possibility of a Jewish homeland in Palestine. We see a president shorn of the usual distractions of office, a man whose sense of personal responsibility for the American people bore heavily upon him. As Woolner argues, even in declining health FDR displayed remarkable political talent and foresight as he focused his energies on shaping the peace to come.

Biographical Notes

David B. Woolner is a senior fellow and the Hyde Park Resident Historian at the Roosevelt Institute and an associate professor of history at Marist College. He lives in Rhinebeck, New York.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780465048717
  • Publication date: 11 Jan 2018
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: Basic Books
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