Shamini Flint - Inspector Singh Investigates: A Frightfully English Execution - Little, Brown Book Group

Inspector Singh Investigates: A Frightfully English Execution

Number 7 in series

By Shamini Flint

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

The seventh novel in the witty, wily Inspector Singh series

Inspector Singh is irate. He's been instructed to attend a Commonwealth conference on policing in London: a job for paper pushers, not real cops, as far as he is concerned.

And as if that isn't bad enough, his wife is determined to come along to shop for souvenirs and visit previously unknown relatives.

But it isn't long before the cold case that lands on Singh's ample lap turns into a hot potato and he has to outwit Scotland Yard, his wife and London's finest criminals to prevent more frightful executions from occurring on his watch - or indeed, from being added to their number.

Biographical Notes

Shamini Flint is a Cambridge graduate and was a lawyer with the UK firm Linklaters for ten years, travelling extensively in Asia during that period, before giving up her practice to concentrate on writing. She is the author of several children's books. Visit her at www.shaminiflint.com

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349402727
  • Publication date: 07 Apr 2016
  • Page count: 368
  • Imprint: Piatkus
It's impossible not to warm to the portly, sweating, dishevelled, wheezing Inspector Singh. — Guardian
Flint adroitly explores both the comic and tragic aspects of life in the city. — Telegraph
It is impossible not to warm to Inspector Singh. We should cherish him. — Daily Mail
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Jeffrey Cranor

Jeffrey Cranor co-writes the hit podcast, novel and touring live show Welcome to Night Vale. He has also written more than one hundred short plays with the New York Neo-Futurists, co-wrote and co-performed a two-man show about time travel with Joseph, and collaborated with choreographer (also wife) Jillian Sweeney to create three full-length dance pieces. Jeffrey lives in New York State.

Jenny Ashcroft

Jenny Ashcroft lives in Brighton with her husband and two children. Before that, she spent many years living and working in Australia and Asia - a time which gave her an enduring passion for stories set in exotic places. She has a degree in history, and has always been fascinated by the past - in particular the way that extraordinary events can transform the lives of normal people. Her first book, Beneath a Burning Sky, was an instant hit with readers who fell in love with Jenny's wonderful, evocative storytelling. Island in the East is her second novel, and her third novel Last Letter to Bombay will publish in November 2018. Keep in touch with Jenny by following her on Twitter (@Jenny_Ashcroft).

John Fairfax

John Fairfax is the pen name of William Brodrick, who practised as a barrister before becoming a full-time novelist. Under his own name he is a previous winner of the Crime Writers Association Gold Dagger Award.

Joseph Fink

Joseph Fink created and co-writes the Welcome to Night Vale podcast, novel and touring live show. In his mid-twenties he started Commonplace Books, producing two collections of short works which he edited at his office job when his boss wasn't looking. He is from California but doesn't live there anymore.