Charles Allen - Tales From the Dark Continent - Little, Brown Book Group

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Tales From the Dark Continent

Images of British Colonial Africa in the Twentieth Century

By Charles Allen

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

Charles Allen's classic book of Colonial Africa - in ebook for the first time.

Charles Allen captures the vanished world of British Colonial Africa in the recollections of the pioneering men and women who lived and worked there.

Biographical Notes

Charles Allen is the author of a number of bestselling books about India and the colonial experience elsewhere. He is a traveller, historian and master storyteller.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780349142173
  • Publication date: 10 Dec 2015
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Abacus
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